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One More Unknown for the Weekend


Ray Garcia
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All do respect, and I know nothing about early cars, but to me the one hanging from the crane looks nothing like the Chryslers pictured. In the 'crane car' the roof line looks to be centred over the back wheel, on the Chrysler its well forward. Also, may just be an illusion but the crane car looks a good bit longer from the A pillar forward, also looks like longer doors.  NOW, it may be a Chrysler with a different roofline, I just dont think the 2 pictured match the op's.

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6 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

All do respect, and I know nothing about early cars, but to me the one hanging from the crane looks nothing like the Chryslers pictured. In the 'crane car' the roof line looks to be centred over the back wheel, on the Chrysler its well forward. Also, may just be an illusion but the crane car looks a good bit longer from the A pillar forward, also looks like longer doors.  NOW, it may be a Chrysler with a different roofline, I just dont think the 2 pictured match the op's.

Oh. I got confused. I thought we were talking about the green coupe.

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The body is by an English or European coachbuilder who embraced the four passenger convertible victoria style earlier than American body and coachbuilder did here.  American automaker chassis were exported to England and all European countries in significant numbers to be bodied by their domestic coachbuilders to get around tariffs on importation complete cars and to tailor the body styles to local taste and preferences.   The pennant hood vents, although difficult to see, make it a 1930 Chrysler 77.   

Ship loading a American convertible victoria - cropped.jpg

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Firstly, the "pennants" on the OP car don't look similar in shape as those on 1930 Chrysler, specifically note the OP car pennant has concave curve on back side, while Chrysler had slight curve on front of pennant. Running board and wheelbase in general look much longer than 30 Chrysler, and tire sizes larger. Also note large hubcaps. Biggest issue for me is hood/cowl/rad. The OP shows perhaps a 3" wide rad shell while Chrysler was only an inch or so. Hood top leaves have a much more squarish look on outer edge (see also cowl band) versus the very rounded Chrysler hood top leaves, suggesting the rad shell would have similar more squarish top corners. While the fenders match Chryslers of the era, they were used on many models, both American and European. The "clean, smooth slab sided" design idiom was popular  with many European coachbuilders (and discerning buyers). 2 bar bumpers suggest 1932 or earlier, and rear spare may suggest something. The longish door suggests likely a 5 seat Victoria, and I know Chrysler made a few of those in late 1931 Model year on the 124" CD8 chassis. Proportionally based on an estimated tire diameter of 30-31 inches, wheelbase for vehicle comes to about 132"-140", longer than any Chrysler except the 1931 Imperials at 145". I'm guessing possibly a Kellner bodied 5 seat coupe, and that 3 piece luggage rack suggests some rich dude going on a long holiday! (note Franklins of that year had a high squarish hood line (here's a '28).

1928 Franklin.jpg

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