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Packard Radiator Script on the stone guard


John Bloom
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On the 1930 Packard car ( usually 7 pass touring cars) there was a much smaller script attached at the factory to the area on the shutters that covered the radiator at the very top just under the plated radiator shell. Perhaps this was done on all cars for export?

Regarding the example you show on the stone guard, I will have to look at the factory accessory catalogs I have in my library from 1920 to 1932 to see what was available or listed in the sheets that came with the illustrated catalog of accessories that gave a cost and part number as well. this may take some time to do .

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31 minutes ago, Walt G said:

On the 1930 Packard car ( usually 7 pass touring cars) there was a much smaller script attached at the factory to the area on the shutters that covered the radiator at the very top just under the plated radiator shell. Perhaps this was done on all cars for export?

Regarding the example you show on the stone guard, I will have to look at the factory accessory catalogs I have in my library from 1920 to 1932 to see what was available or listed in the sheets that came with the illustrated catalog of accessories that gave a cost and part number as well. this may take some time to do .

Thanks Walt, I'm specifically interested in 1930 733 Club sedans, but to know what was correct for other models and years is interesting.  I always associate this look with earlier cars, and I like it.

 

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Hi John

I have the accessory catalog Packard issued in 1930 for the 7th series cars, will take a look.

Re the club sedan yo are interested in, new carburetors were once available for sale by someone in Nevada I believe BUT cost was in the $3,000.00 range.

Since I bought my 733 in 2016 I have tried to acquire any and everything paper wise that Packard issued for the car. The fact that the car yo will look at does not have the original carb on it may influence you to think accordingly about $ to pay.

Walt

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Walt and West, thanks for your information.  I like those Radiator scripts and I see them on a few examples of that era.  I guess it is just a nonfactory accessory that some owners want to put on to dress up the front end.  Good to know that it isn't wrong to be without it.  The front end of those cars speaks for itself.  Walt, I have been doing lots of research on those carburetors.  They are pricey, but may be a good investment in the long haul to have a good running car.    West has also spoken to me about the cost of getting the correct carburetor for the car.  I appreciate both of your help.  

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The trend today (thankfully) is that LESS is more better. "Dressing up" a Classic car is NOT needed. As you mention, the front of the car does not need anything extra to "dress it up". Many people used to install extra spot lights, driving lights, stone guards, detachable trunks, HUGE Lalique hood ornaments, etc. Not needed. The novelty is for amateurs to look at and go all googly-eyed over. The car ends up looking gaudy.

 

 

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Walt, (and all other viewers...) while you are perusing your old accessory catalogs, please keep an eye out for the running board trunk. Here are a couple pics of ours.  It is sitting on the running board of our early Third Series sedan.  On both sides are fittings, I assume are for securing the trunk to the running board.

Note that the back door can clear the trunk,, but it would take a gymnast to get in or out of the car with the trunk rigidly fixed, so I am suspecting that there must have been some intriguing hardward to swivel the trunk for ingress and egress, so does the catalog depict the hardware?

 

Thanks for looking...

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