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New Collectible Car Magazine is now out!


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14 minutes ago, 30DodgePanel said:

The Malaise styling era may end up in the dumpster though...

There was no 'style' in that era. 

 

Just ugliness at each end with those ghastly 5-mph battering ram bumpers, and in between, tacky overpadded vinyl tops, peek-a-boo opera windows, and pimp-your-ride velour interiors with acres of plastic 'wood'.

 

Craig

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One man's trash is another man's treasure.

The 1970's era being disparaged is among

my favorite decades of cars.  I wrote an editorial

on the subject a few years ago.  I wouldn't mind

settling into the comfortable seats of a Lincoln

Mark V, or buying one when there was a choice

of perhaps 8 velour colors and 20 varieties of paint.

 

I feel no "malaise" at all.  Surely people don't

object to the equally large bumpers of the 1950's,

nor think 1976 Eldorado convertibles are valueless!

 

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Dave, thank you for your insight. Being in the shipping of publications gives you a whole understanding of a world that most of us here can only guess at.

This insight goes for many applications when it comes down to reality as to how the "real" situation is on an everyday basis. Even teaching school. I had this when I taught art in Elementary school for decades. Great colleagues who didn't understand all teaching situations . I was often told ( in a lofty voice of authority) "you only have the class for 45 minutes once a week , I have to have them all day" I would reply and yes you have perhaps 23 kids, and can know what is/isn't right with them emotionally and physically - I have 150 kids per day and have to sort that out with no clue from you what is or isn't going on 7 times a day for each new class.  That usually didn't sit to well.

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43 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

One man's trash is another man's treasure.

The 1970's era being disparaged is among

my favorite decades of cars.  I wrote an editorial

on the subject a few years ago.  I wouldn't mind

settling into the comfortable seats of a Lincoln

Mark V, or buying one when there was a choice

of perhaps 8 velour colors and 20 varieties of paint.

 

I feel no "malaise" at all.  Surely people don't

object to the equally large bumpers of the 1950's,

nor think 1976 Eldorado convertibles are valueless!

 

The 'good' is you can find them for dirt cheap; less than the cost of a decent repaint of one.

 

Craig

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Walt G:  These lyrics might have been useful to give your colleagues perspective.

 

"Walk a mile in my shoes
Walk a mile in my shoes
Hey, before you abuse, criticize and accuse
Walk a mile in my shoes"

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I miss going to pubs. That said anymore I prefer to receive publications in .pdf form, much easier to read and store.

 

Back in the day we developed some cryptographic/compression mechanisms to control distribution. No one in this country was interested.

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Padgett. This pub may go digital at sometime. That allows you access to back copies as well as current subs IF you subscribe. The publisher can easily control access thru an active email sub list. Most publications today offer a subscription that can be print, digital or both. Some have same price, others discount the digital by a portion of the mailing cost. It does cost to digitize the copy so it still cost the publisher to produce. Maybe this pub will offer that service once it reaches a subscriber base to support both print and digital. 
As far as being easier to read, that becomes a personal choice. Surveys have proven that not to be the preferred case. I will agree on easy storage with a pdf. In my experience technical magazines have a small edge over consumer (enjoyment type magazines) for digital readership. On average tech mags have about a 28% readership as opposed to 20-22% consumer readership.  The reason given is searching for specific information is required more often in tech mags. 
dave s 

Edited by SC38DLS (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

One man's trash is another man's treasure.

The 1970's era being disparaged is among

my favorite decades of cars.  I wrote an editorial

on the subject a few years ago.  I wouldn't mind

settling into the comfortable seats of a Lincoln

Mark V, or buying one when there was a choice

of perhaps 8 velour colors and 20 varieties of paint.

 

I feel no "malaise" at all.  Surely people don't

object to the equally large bumpers of the 1950's,

nor think 1976 Eldorado convertibles are valueless!

 

Past the middle of the 70's you see American and Japanese cars turn to European three box styling and some receive upgraded suspensions for a European taut feel, remove lead from fuel, a emphasis on safety and mileage, and a reduction of 75% or more in exhaust emissions, and make drivability from the 1973-4 era much better. 

I'm with you John, I like them.

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Im old fashioned. I prefer paper in my hand. I dont even like looking at parts catalogs on the web. Although I think I need a new set of spec's.  I was trying to read my latest Smoke Signals last night and was having a hard time with the print size. Not to mention when the background colour changes. Dark print on a dark background is completely lost on me!  Hemmings big book, I dont even get that anymore, I cant read the classifieds if I had to!

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2 hours ago, padgett said:

Have books on four walls to ceiling mostly two deep and two more rows above computer. Have plenty of paper, just prefer searchable .pdfs for manuals.

I have 2 older brothers that are both highly educated and very intelligent. Both are avid readers. They literally have rooms full of books. Me on the other, I barely have enough patience to get through a Mad magazine.

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And the winner is:  Crankshaft, on my front porch this afternoon! Nice heavy mailing package, delivered to my doorstep, not in my mailbox. First rate so far, cant wait to tear into it!

 

Still waiting on Hemmings and AACA.

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2 minutes ago, TAKerry said:

And the winner is:  Crankshaft, on my front porch this afternoon! Nice heavy mailing package...

 

T. A. K., is the mailing package something rigid 

so that a mailman cannot bend it?  As I wrote earlier

on this thread, my mailman, in sorting, folds over

all magazines and large envelopes, even Collectible

Automobile that says "Do Not Bend."  The

high-quality thick cover of Collectible Automobile

has frequently been creased.

 

If Crankshaft's package is rigid and unfoldable,

I can get it undamaged.  I want a good magazine and

would be happy to help Richard's new enterprise.

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John. This package is based on mailing single issues out I’m sure as label is hand written. A mass issue mailing going at periodical rate will not be mailed in individual media mail with tracking if it is like most magazines. I would write the publisher to see if this is the case if you are that concerned. 
A complaint to your postmaster regarding the condition of your mail will go further than anything else to solve the problem. 
Good luck. 
dave s 

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7 hours ago, TAKerry said:

Is that $21. shipping?   WoW, mine was $3.25 

No, it works out to $27.06  when you factor the US <--->     CDN dollar exchange.  🤬

 

As for parts, many who live close to the US border have bigger parts shipped to border towns which worked great until the Covid thing hit.

 

Craig

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Yes, that has been my method for many years. I simply could not do it any other way. Since covid my old car activities have been at a standstill. The exchange is bad enough , shipping to Canada makes the entire proposition a no go for me. Strangely enough I have sold a few parts to US buyers and postage from Canada to the U.S. is really not all that bad. Often no more than from Western Canada to Eastern Canada. U.S. to Canada is a whole different story. I can often get things mailed from the U.K. cheaper than right next door in the U.S. , Washington State is  3 miles Due South of my front door.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Another reason I prefer electronic media. Instant and essentially free.

CD has been sitting in Towson, Md. PO since 22nd. Not going to receive this month, maybe next.

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It cost a magazine a good amount to convert the print version to digital. Then it cost them to upload that to subscribers plus the cost of maintaining that subscriber list. It is not cheap, I know because that is how I made my living owning a company that provided that service. It also gave 49 employees a good living. So don’t believe it is essentially “FREE”, nothing in life worth anything is free! 
dave s 

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I received my copy in the mail last night, (over a week to make it 80miles, from one Massachusetts town to another Massachusetts town) though i have only had a chance to thumb through it, it definitely seems worthwhile. i originally just bought the single copy, but i will probably be signing up for the quarterly subscription. Well put together, quality feel and beautiful pictures. Im always interested in anything related to Harry Miller, so i am especially looking forward to reading that feature. 

 

20210301_190303.thumb.jpg.6809deabf3566dcf7a44c7579ac87ad2.jpg

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On 2/24/2021 at 4:55 AM, 8E45E said:

There was no 'style' in that era. 

 

Just ugliness at each end with those ghastly 5-mph battering ram bumpers, and in between, tacky overpadded vinyl tops, peek-a-boo opera windows, and pimp-your-ride velour interiors with acres of plastic 'wood'.

 

Craig

Really Craig! This doesn't happen to be my car, but mine is identical to it. I can find cars from every era that I like. I don't know if it's a bane or a blessing, but I know that I feel sorry for those folks unable to get some enjoyment out of any era and all continents.

1976 Jaguar XJ12C | K8 | Kissimmee 2016

Edited by Buffalowed Bill (see edit history)
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On 2/24/2021 at 5:55 AM, 8E45E said:

There was no 'style' in that era. 

 

Just ugliness at each end with those ghastly 5-mph battering ram bumpers, and in between, tacky overpadded vinyl tops, peek-a-boo opera windows, and pimp-your-ride velour interiors with acres of plastic 'wood'.

 

Craig

image.jpeg.a4d9f02753e4eee64e2f5baa7998f329.jpegimage.jpeg.d19cfff7d4e1f1472801a4b1cd427675.jpeg

 

 

image.jpeg.9e8240d6aab82d4dd14e98a71af6c591.jpegimage.jpeg.160190ed2f6317405451b920bdb9c041.jpeg

 

Ghastly?

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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A man who can read and does not, is no better than a man who can not. 
 

I just can’t live without books.

 

Both of the above by Thomas Jefferson. Founder of the University of Virginia, the writer of the Declaration of Independence, and...........President of the United States of America. He wished history to forget the last one.

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2 hours ago, Buffalowed Bill said:

Really Craig! This doesn't happen to be my car, but mine is identical to it. I can find cars from every era that I like. I don't know if it's a bane or a blessing, but I know that I feel sorry for those folks unable to get some enjoyment out of any era and all continents.

1976 Jaguar XJ12C | K8 | Kissimmee 2016

I see a home-market XJC with the chrome bumpers that were designed for in the first place, and a true two door HARDTOP with four fully lowering windows, and NO overdone padded vinyl top.

 

Craig

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Apart from a fair heft and ample + overall size I rather like XJ -6 C's . Similar sort of car to an Interceptor although If price were equal I would probably give a slight preference to the Jensen. Both are far too thirsty to be have a place on my want list but I always appreciate seeing them . How is it that England was doing luxury /sports cars so well when at the same time the American makers got it all so wrong in the early 1970's ? I know the English cars were a bit more expensive than the domestic products in this type of car but that does not account for all of it . Most of the North American Jag's and Jensen's were spoiled by the fitment of automatic transmission's as well as the previously mentioned " Federal " bumpers.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, 1912Staver said:

 How is it that England was doing luxury /sports cars so well when at the same time the American makers got it all so wrong in the early 1970's ? I know the English cars were a bit more expensive than the domestic products in this type of car but that does not account for all of it . Most of the North American Jag's and Jensen's were spoiled by the fitment of automatic transmission's as well as the previously mentioned " Federal " bumpers.

On the INSIDE, the English and the Germans kept their REAL wood and genuine leather, along with their cabin ambience.

 

The (once) Big Three luxury cars resorted to plastic make to look like wood in the 1970's.  In the 1960's, the wood and leather in Cadillac Fleetwood, Lincoln Continental and the Imperial Le Baron was actually real.

 

Craig

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For me at least it's not the wood and leather that make the difference, although it is a nice touch . The main difference is the road manners of the British cars. Particularly the Jensen, but also present in the SWB Jag XJ's . That handling feel that is only slightly softer than an all out sports car. Aston Martin is the gold standard but in another league price wise; the V8's were reasonable for a couple of decades but no more, but the Jensen would be a close second, especially when that 440 punch is experienced. And even the Jag is a very capable road car compared to almost any of the American built competition. Real vs fake wood is something you get over almost at once, but road manners are something you live with every time you turn a wheel.

 I am only in my 60's so no real desire for anything more luxurious than my TVR or MGA. But in another decade or so I might desire something that has a few more creature comfort's without going "whole hog " like a mid  1970's and up , Thunderbird or Grand Prix.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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