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My old car does not like this cold weather


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27° at the moment, was 5° earlier this week. Haven't seen the negatives yet like so many have. Coldest I've ever seen was -14° two or three years ago.

 

I prefer cold weather so I was fine with that and am comfortable now. Mid 40s is my preferred temperature range 

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Really bad here in central Florida. About 60F but will warm up to the mid 70's later.

 

Since this forum is viewed all over the world, it would be great if you would tell the area you live. The temp would have a lot more meaning if the general area was known.

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6° below F according to my window thermometer this early AM.  Though by the end of this week, its supposed to be in the mid-thirties.  (Calgary, AB)

 

Craig

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to My old car does not like this cold weather
1 hour ago, MikeC5 said:

Consider the non-multi viscosity lubricants they had back then also...  

I worked in a gas station in Dearborn when I was a teenager, it was really a garage, gas was secondary. A lot of old timers would come hang around in the morning and drink coffee with us. By the front door we always kept a galvanized pitcher with a spout full of water, for a car that might come in overheating etc.

 

One of the old guys that cut teeth on the model T told us they used one of those for their oil. In cold weather they'd drain their oil in it and take it in the house, at work the same thing. They said if they didn't, it would never start.

 

They used to give us little trinkets they had laying around the house, old ''Ford'' oil cans which I still have. Another model T thing was the little magneto wrench set. They are made like a hinged feeler gage set, although one of the tools is a small open end wrench, then one leaf to set the mag and another to set the plugs, I've always assumed that is what each is for. They've been rolling around my machinists box for 40 years.

 

One of them had a like new 1910? Ford Torpedo roadster. He would drive it up occasionally.

 

Every morning there was a revolving group of them there, learned a lot from them.

 

I'm rambling😁

 

Ron

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There were under hood heaters too that were what we called smudge pots, kerosene heaters that ran at low levels and made quite a bit of smoke along with heat.  They used to show up at flea markets quite often, not sure if they still do. Cardboard in front of the radiator was another common occurrence, don’t see much of that anymore.  An old green wool Army blanket was part of my winter outfitting along with chains and a folding shovel and jumper cables that were a year round accessory. Of course this was all before the age of cellphones and being able to call for help if needed.

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5 minutes ago, TerryB said:

There were under hood heaters too that were what we called smudge pots, kerosene heaters that ran at low levels and made quite a bit of smoke along with heat.  They used to show up at flea markets quite often, not sure if they still do. Cardboard in front of the radiator was another common occurrence, don’t see much of that anymore.  An old green wool Army blanket was part of my winter outfitting along with chains and a folding shovel and jumper cables that were a year round accessory. Of course this was all before the age of cellphones and being able to call for help if needed.

The steamers would leave the pilot light going and a horse blanket draped over - how many of them burned. I read somewhere that insurance companies would not cover a garage that housed a steamer running on gasoline, kerosene only.

 

Ron

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My father believed in dumping dry gas in the gas tank and would usually have a half dozen bottles of it on hand at any given time.  We did not have a garage so winter prep for the car was a big deal to get done in October so you could hopefully make it through the winter.  This was in north central PA where it did get cold and snowy.

Edited by TerryB (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, 28 Chrysler said:

High only 63° today with lows in the lower 40s. Low taxes was not the only reason I left the upper Midwest.

 

I'd miss the joy of winter if I moved to a sweltering climate.

Every part of the country has its good points.

Breathing cold air is refreshing!  If the air is 10-below or less,

it's like breathing in a cool refreshing mint.

 

And nothing can match the comfort of relaxing by a warm

fireplace, or snuggling warmly under layers of blankets.

Spring comes, and the landscape comes alive, and we

have a whole new time to appreciate.

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-14 C here in S-W Ontario. Had to heat up the carb & intake to get this Stovebolt equipped 1966 Pontiac Laurentian to start. Before anyone starts into me about the a Chevy inline 6 transplant, rest assured it's a Oshawa Ontario Canada built original engined car. Just doesn't like the cold and has been sitting for a few years.

 

minvet 005.jpg

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Here's just a side note. I live in a part of southern California that can get sub freezing temps. The first year I had the car, I decided to put antifreeze in it just in case. But that got me wondering what they did originally to prevent engine freeze-up. Upon reading the owners manual for the car, it says to add a mixture of water and ethyl (grain) alcohol and water.  Hmmmm. I can imagine the conversation now: "Honest officer, I wasn't runnin' 'shine (moonshine), I was transportin' antifreeze for them Northeners!"

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1 hour ago, Max4Me said:

it says to add a mixture of water and ethyl (grain) alcohol

Then you had to check every week to see if the mixture was still strong enough as the alcohol tended to boil off far faster than the water. I think there used to be a lot more frozen block in those days. 

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20 minutes ago, Fossil said:

Then you had to check every week to see if the mixture was still strong enough as the alcohol tended to boil off far faster than the water. I think there used to be a lot more frozen block in those days. 

The service manual for my Rambler says to use a 160 degree thermostat if using alcohol antifreeze, 195 for the green stuff. I guess the idea was the alcohol would boil away slower at the lower temp. I'm just surprised that people were still using the alcohol into the 1960s. Must have been cheaper?

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10 hours ago, GARY F said:

Where is this temp??

I am just out side of Omaha Nebraska .. I worked in the Garage tonight.. I took a beer to drink. It was frozen in 10 mins..

 

It is only 11 degree in side.. We may be -35 tonight..

 

I was told to watch the storm of 1949 on the internet.. It has a lot of old cars in it.. 

 

 

 

 

 

temp.jpg

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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The local electric company may turn off our service for 30 mins to 2 hours over the next 3 days..

 

6000 homes got hit today... They just turn off it off..

 

Just do not know how the Dragon will turn out.. Just got it home 3 months ago..

 

I had a lot of things that are frozen.. Windex, simple green  and dish soap..  We had milk in the garage refrigerator it did  not make it..  It just made a mess..

thumbnail_thumbnail_IMG_7457.jpg

thumbnail_thumbnail_IMG_7462.jpg

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, Mark I said:

-16. St. Paul, MN. Below zero or near zero since 2/6. Coldest was -18 Sat night. Nothing too unusual for us.

 

Mark

Mark is right, it's sort of business as usual in the Twin Cities. Despite the cold, it's been pretty calm and uneventful. I love the crystal clear skies that accompany a cold stretch.

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The Armistice Day Blizzard, Nov11, 1940, Minnesota:

 

 

#2 Nov 11, 1940 Armistice Day Blizzard

armistice.jpg

Excelsior Boulevard, west of Minneapolis after the Armistice Day Storm
Courtesy: Minnesota Historical Society

The Armistice Day Blizzard Ranks #2 on the Minnesota State Climatology Office Top five weather events of the 20th century. Ask any Minnesotan born before 1940 and they can tell you where they were during the Armistice Day Blizzard. The weather was relatively benign the morning of the November 11, 1940. Many people were outdoors, taking advantage of the mild holiday weather. The weather forecast that morning was for colder temperatures and a few flurries. Few people were prepared for what was to come. The storm started with rain, however the rain quickly turned to snow. By the time the blizzard tapered off on the 12th, the Twin Cities had received 16.7 inches of snow, Collegeville 26.6 inches, and 20-foot drifts were reported near Willmar. In all 49 Minnesotans lost their lives in this storm, many of them hunters trapped by the sudden turn of events.

 

Armistice Day blizzard

 

4.bp_.blogspot.comarmistice-day-blizzard-1-7088e89a2c42fb15a7c0b1c1e943535e393853e2-640x381.jpg

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The U.P. in MI has a telephone pole outside Copper Harbor that they mark the annual snow fall on. If I remember correctly (I’m old and haven’t been there in years) the high mark was something like 222 inches!  Now that is a lot of snow. 
dave s 

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16 hours ago, Ed Luddy said:

this Stovebolt equipped 1966 Pontiac Laurentian to start.

 

Not a Stove Bolt, but the new designed lightweight six cylinder block. Stove Bolts are the ones with the "Stove Bolts" holding various covers onto the block and head. Last of that linage* was the 1962 235 cubic inch, however that was so far improved many do not think the Stovebolt term should even apply to them (with their pressure lubricated rod bearings!).😁

 

* Unless you also want to count the Toyota copy, the F engine.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_F_engine, that continued until 1990 or so....

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15 hours ago, nick8086 said:

I am just out side of Omaha Nebraska .. I worked in the Garage tonight.. I took a beer to drink. It was frozen in 10 mins..

 

It is only 11 degree in side.. We may be -35 tonight..

 

I was told to watch the storm of 1949 on the internet.. It has a lot of old cars in it.. 

 

 

 

 

 

temp.jpg

What a great video of 49. I was 10 yrs old and didn't know anything about it then.

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The 67 snow was the year McCormick place in Chicago burned!  The snow was so bad the fire trucks couldn’t get to it before it was too late. It was so intense the steel beams were bent like pretzels. 
 

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Had to move June bug this evening and it was about zero outside and a little warmer in that garage. Started OK but from the sounds until the oil pressure came up it didn't like it . Probably won't be doing that again. At least it's in a heated shop now. 

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I always made it a point to fire up my cars in the coldest weather and drive.

From 1923 to 53 they all were in good enough shape to crank over well and fire in the single digits if not a bit below zero .

Whether a Model T,Essex..Nash , 1930 Hupmobile or 48 Chrysler,the motors all thrived in cold weather.

 

Only once did a Model A give me trouble, when conditions where just right at 11 degrees,at night on the highway. The carb started icing up and started killing the motor at 50 MPH.

Pulled over to look for trouble and saw frosty the snow carburetor...

It thawed quickly, sitting for a few minutes on the side of the highway with engine heat..

Started up fine once the white was gone and we were good as long as we didn't go over 45.mph.

 

Accolades to the Model T gang.

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9 hours ago, Flivverking said:

The carb started icing up and started killing the motor

I had that happen on a plane once. Thankfully I was at a 1000ft AGL so had plenty of time so I used the nearest stubble field. Sat there idling until the carb thawed. Then went straight home. 

When I worked for Texaco they told us anytime the ambient temp. was 70 degrees or lower ice could form in a carb. Particularly at lower throttle settings. 

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Just for the record, my older vehicles like the cold a LOT better than the new electronic marvels like it.

 

The newer cars with all the live sensors drain the battery in this cold in a couple of days if not started.

 

Jon.

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