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Rear Lens


Retired w/Reatta
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One of my projects this winter/Covid-19 isolation was to put together a good replacement rear lens from the half dozen or so I've accumulated over the years for the one on my '90 blue coupe which has gotten quite cloudy and has sprung a leak.

I've noticed some interesting parts of this system:  The wiring harness is home to no less than 18 bulbs.  For this discussion I'll only deal with the 12, 2057s as the main illumination.  Three observations: 1)  The end 3 bulbs on each harness have burn marks on the sockets and the bulbs are toast;  2)  The sockets have an abundance of brown goo that I imagine is some kind of dielectric grease; and 3)  The outside of the sockets are covered in a black goo.

I won't even go into the red reflectors that are fastened to the rear unit by plastic screws and metal nuts.

I had a professor who once said, " Fifty percent of all engineers (insert any profession you want) graduated in the lower half of their class".

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On the red reflectors.

Years ago I used to break lots of the studs holding the red reflectors. I then came on a way to not break them and have successfully removed MANY since then.

Using a propane torch or a heat gun will work, I heat the plastic stud for about 2 seconds with the torch, maybe a little longer with a heat gun, and then remove the nut. Comes right off easy. After doing this, the stamped steel nut, coming off, makes better grooves in the stud so when putting it back on the nut is not so tight and goes back on easy without the chance of breaking the stud.

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1 hour ago, Jim said:

On the red reflectors.

Years ago I used to break lots of the studs holding the red reflectors. I then came on a way to not break them and have successfully removed MANY since then.

Using a propane torch or a heat gun will work, I heat the plastic stud for about 2 seconds with the torch, maybe a little longer with a heat gun, and then remove the nut. Comes right off easy. After doing this, the stamped steel nut, coming off, makes better grooves in the stud so when putting it back on the nut is not so tight and goes back on easy without the chance of breaking the stud.

 

Jim, I would like to add this to the How-to Guides on ROJ if it's OK with you?

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