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1910 era raceabout


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A photo posted on a facebook page.  Note the distinctive front end - tubular axle and full elliptic front springs, and 14 spoke wheels.

 

I suspect what looks like a name plate across the front of the radiator top tank may be later addition.

 

 

20s autos Larry Hewitt raceabout.jpg

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Might the ACE on the seat side suggest something (other than the owner/driver's nickname)? It was a common practice to sell stripped down versions of family cars as sport versions and give them a catchy model name. Springs could be 3/4 elliptic. OOPs, thanks for clearing up the JCB monogram.

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Gunsmoke said:

Might the ACE on the seat side suggest something (other than the owner/driver's nickname)? It was a common practice to sell stripped down versions of family cars as sport versions and give them a catchy model name. Springs could be 3/4 elliptic.

 

That ACE actually says J.C.B

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The heavy crossmember appears to be the anchor point for the quarter elliptic part of the front springs.  How many cars had three quarter elliptic springs at the front?  I don't think they are very common at the rear of a car, are they?

The top tank on the radiator seems to be very large and a tall filler neck.  High placed handle on the engine hood.  Is the headlight a later addition?

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A few enlargements to assist those with failing eyesight, like me! (1)Front picture, frame is straight end to end, (no kickups, drops or horns). Note front springs appear 3/4 elliptic with a longish shackle at rear of lower spring. Large bar at front of frame is clearly a substantial cross member as none other likely exist until rear of powerplant. Radiator has very purposeful large top tank, smallish air inlet area. Longish drum style hood suggest might be more than 4 cylinders, interesting ribbing and simple handle. Car is RHD and only has a headlight on RH Side. (2)Second pic shows the simple trussed frame side rails, nicely cast steel running board brackets including what appears to be an RB cross support bar, quality fittings of lower cowl and seat base and quality tufted seating. (3)Rear photo appears to show a cast steel "horn" secured to frame rail, likely to connect to a semi- elliptic spring. Oval gas tank likely fits behind the young fellow.(4)Finally the 4 spoke steering wheel appears to be aluminum and note the rod extending down column with a lever on underside of wheel. I sense this is a pretty high quality build, and its low profile generally and sparseness of amenities suggests designed specifically for speed. Early Mercers of 1913/14 (this is not one) echoed this same general look.   

1914 era speedster (2).jpg

1914 era speedster (3).jpg

1914 era speedster (4).jpg

1914 era speedster (5).jpg

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1 hour ago, Gunsmoke said:

A few enlargements to assist those with failing eyesight, like me! (1)Front picture, frame is straight end to end, (no kickups, drops or horns). Note front springs appear 3/4 elliptic with a longish shackle at rear of lower spring. Large bar at front of frame is clearly a substantial cross member as none other likely exist until rear of powerplant. Radiator has very purposeful large top tank, smallish air inlet area. Longish drum style hood suggest might be more than 4 cylinders, interesting ribbing and simple handle. Car is RHD and only has a headlight on RH Side. (2)Second pic shows the simple trussed frame side rails, nicely cast steel running board brackets including what appears to be an RB cross support bar, quality fittings of lower cowl and seat base and quality tufted seating. (3)Rear photo appears to show a cast steel "horn" secured to frame rail, likely to connect to a semi- elliptic spring. Oval gas tank likely fits behind the young fellow.(4)Finally the 4 spoke steering wheel appears to be aluminum and note the rod extending down column with a lever on underside of wheel. I sense this is a pretty high quality build, and its low profile generally and sparseness of amenities suggests designed specifically for speed. Early Mercers of 1913/14 (this is not one) echoed this same general look.   

1914 era speedster (2).jpg

1914 era speedster (3).jpg

1914 era speedster (4).jpg

1914 era speedster (5).jpg

 

 

I suspect that head lamp, being electric, may be a later addition.

 

Does anyone recognise anything familiar about the architecture of the buildings in the background?

 

The young people on the car don't look to be western European. I wondered if the location might be eastern Europe somewhere?

 

 

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The building is a temporary canvas one like what was used by military and government medics.

My first impression was a family photo from Spain around 1920.

The boy had to have been working  looking at his hands.

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