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What the heck is this thing?


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54 minutes ago, Morgan Wright said:

I wonder if it will keep the glass window from riding on the spare tire

 

No, it only supports the folded side supports of the roof bows, latched in place on the two sides adjacent to a rear seat

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The glass shouldn't touch the spare if everything is as the factory finished it. The glass also would be protected by one fold of the top material. The saddle should hold the irons high enough to keep everything where they should be.

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)
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13 minutes ago, JFranklin said:

I think those brackets had some type of cushioning material, rubber, leather, or canvas, to keep the irons from damage. I have some with reminants of rubber.

 

Yeah the parts book pictures a rubber lining. It also says that for 1918, the model 44, 45, and 49 had these and they were different for all 3. Mine is the right one for the 49.

 

I adjusted the board that I use to protect the glass window from banging on the spare tire, so the top comes lower and the whole thing fits now. I need one for the other side now!!

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Morgan, 

    The Convertible top boot is used to keep the glass off the back tire.  The clamps were not normally left installed outside the car.  To fold the top you needed to install the clamps and then use the top boot.  I think that is why these are usually missing.  Loose parts.      Hugh    

 

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8 minutes ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

Morgan, 

      The clamps were not normally left installed outside the car. 

     Hugh    

 

Were they removed to lower wind resistance drag?

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7 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

 The clamps were not normally left installed outside the car.  To fold the top you needed to install the clamps and then use the top boot.  I think that is why these are usually missing.  Loose parts.      Hugh    

 

Whaaaat are you talking about? On a teens car? Really?

They’re fixed on mine. They were assembled and affixed to the car at one time yes, but that was on the assembly line....

*humorously playing that up a bit, but am reasonably certain they were permanently affixed on ‘teens open Buicks*

B3F8D8DB-3A9D-407E-B422-25FE526F28BC.jpeg

Edited by Ben P.
Clarity (see edit history)
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The E-series cars and earlier did not have a skirt of top material extending along the top side of the car body following the angle of the rearmost top iron. The back top material (where the rear window is) terminated at the seat back before the curve in the body extending towards the passenger doors. (Sorry that’s the best I can put it into English.)

There wouldn’t be any material in the vicinity of the clamps when folded. At all. Not going over them anyway.

That said, I have seen a few 1920’s photos of E and even D series Buicks where that ‘skirt’ was present and I presume that would’ve been a replacement top done in the ‘side skirted’ style of the 20’s. I’ve also seen at least 1 restored E series where someone had taken the liberty of installing a 20’s style top - but it wouldn’t’ve been there in 1918 and before.

(Not a detail that ever occurred to me to photograph, but the cropped factory brochure illustration shows well the location of the clamp on the folded top and it’s well clear of any collapsed material. The illustrator made it and the top boot appear a little trimmer and straighter than it really was but the location is correct.)

1E91AAED-2E6E-44CC-97A4-346F1BDB3FC4.jpeg

63A32391-7331-4037-98BF-85663753094B.jpeg

Edited by Ben P.
Clarity (see edit history)
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It varies by year.  Some car companies and models made the top clamps permanent to stay outside the body, others had them removable for stowing.   Agreed that it was more likely for a teens car to have them permanently affixed, but in the later years you do not see them as frequently on the cars in photos with the tops up.     

Attached are factory photos and a photo of Leif Holmbergs original top on his 1925 Buick.  Now you have gypsy curtains (the term used for the side pieces of the top).  Notice how if you do not unscrew these when the top is up, it really stretches the top fabric and can create a place for water to enter the car.   On Leif's car I can see the wood behind the canvas and the canvas is fatigued here.  Hugh

 

1344558834_1a1925-25sales.thumb.JPG.75cd5bcb0fc25b26c1767f2647dff6bd.JPG1262922265_1aa1922thru1924sidequarterandgypsycurtain(19236cylindershown).JPG.e5aea50c16e1eac9dd30afbf5423c2b5.JPG647773301_Buicksufflett003.thumb.jpg.012c92cd2d2abe4735fb029610e16c72.jpg

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

Now you have gypsy curtains (the term used for the side pieces of the top). 

LOL

That term was on the tip of my tongue for hours and it took me 77 words to describe them.... 

I think you may have nailed the reason the top camps are missing on many 20’s cars. I didn’t know they were removable - recall many discussions on this forum where the mounting holes were filled with a plug. Assumed that was for tops that were either ‘fixed’ (non-collapsible) or ‘California tops’.

This turned into an interesting thread....

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DSCF5684.thumb.JPG.be3c85c58b5022550705cb0dc18b8ad6.JPG  My 1925-45 with clamps and the boot I had made for my Standard.     

1140579663_1925-55(1024x797).jpg.834e8c59fe0b9a6d0ec9f04e12df804d.jpg Period photo of 1925-55 with clamps and boot.

When we were at the AACA fall meetat Gettysburg, we watched some fellows putting down the top of their Cole V8. DSCF8428.thumb.JPG.08380419ba2d70da8bcfd825f88059e4.JPG

I had to stop them because they were attempting to place the folded top in the clamps without undoing the snaps of the gypsy sides and folding them in.

 

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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Morgan, 

    That looks great folded.  Hopefully you can find another clamp on Ebay.  There are many varieties with subtle differences.  They do have rubber or leather in them to protect the paint.  These are the instructions for folding the top.  The gypsy curtains are supposed to be folded in and tucked behind the tension straps prior to folding the top.  It is also important to pull the top back and then tuck it in.  The top pads need to be kept out of the top sockets as much as possible so that the stack can be latched.  This is from the 1926 Buick export manual.  Interesting that I have not seen these instruction in any US document, and it is not in the 1925 export manual.   The one man operation folding it while walking over the front seat is also a neat trick and has to be done very carefully.  I also put pads over the rear doors because it would be easy to drop the rear of the top onto the tops of the doors during the folding process. Notice all the snaps and the 2 straps in the top boot to hold the rear glass.

 

Hugh

1488006715_1a11926touringtoplowering(1).thumb.jpg.63ecc8272199901722f4846d59c96367.jpg801574403_1a11926touringtoplowering(2).thumb.jpg.3ca9d89792d11e76d6bfaa81e3923d1a.jpg755827064_1a11926touringtoplowering(3).thumb.jpg.c78f243455301b47e855abef6fdb76bf.jpg521080475_1a11926touringtoplowering(4).thumb.jpg.1c89a90e1f9a053a46784784575002d9.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, Rod Wise said:

Larry,   I,m surprised you have the large clamps on your 25-45.  I thought the small rests were used by 1925.

Rod:

The 1924 Master Book of Parts I have call out the clamps #183824 R and #183825 L"Top Holders" for both the 1925 Master and Standard touring.

TOP REST

#18294 rest for Burbank Cloth tops.... Req 2.

 I have had to make new "reat seat iron studs" for both cars. As they were missing. I had to shorten the Hidem on the Standard since when they put the incorrect style top on in the 1960s tacked over the stud location.

 When I first got Remley he had 7/16" all thread and a piece of rubber hose as rests.

DSCF5633.thumb.JPG.7c2e3e9ae371f230e014a976c375676c.JPG

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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