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2 hours ago, George Smolinski said:

or what shipping would be.

I think airplanes would 'self ship'.

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Very, VERY different times,  back then. Equivalency is not exact, and the exchange rate was different, but those four thousand pounds might be something like what $100,000+ would be today. And don’t forget, billionaires hadn’t popped up like mushrooms after a Fall rain just yet. A net worth of $10 million was unusual and impressive in those days. Only a very few families of the kids I went to school with had loot like that. Now , some of those kids are billionaires, and do have impressive collections of aircraft. One of the kids from that school is the late Paul Allen. He does not come from great wealth, but his flying toys are noteworthy around these parts. Floating toys, too. I used to do a lot of drooling and daydreaming over the desirable cars listed for just a very few hundreds of pounds sterling for sale in “The Exchange and Mart” back in the mid ‘60s. Anyone remember that “ad rag” ? Best of Britain for a pittance.   Oh , if , if , if only...................       -   Carl 

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Bottom line is that I had no ability to gather up some coin at age 3 in 1965 to purchase an iconic piece of history.  Alas: If I could only go back in time and buy some Bitcoin in 2010, sell it now, and then take a trip in an Elon Musk "Time Machine" to 1965 I would have purchased more than that Spitfire. 

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I was fortunate enough to see a variety of WWII planes at a fly in.  It's surprising how much smaller the 1940 planes like Spitfires and 109's are compared to the late war Mustangs and Furies.  I understand why, but it's sports cars vs GT's.

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Somewhere along the line the costs of flying took a big jump upward. At one time my grandfather and father were both pilots, my grandfather was an AME and my father was a recreational flyer. I flew quite a bit with a friend up until the mid 1980's recession wiped out all of our jobs. Incomes never seemed to keep pace after that. Prices of planes seemed to steadily march upwards along with all the other costs of flying. 

 Wages took a decade or more to recover if at all. Flying became priced out of reach for all but a few. Sort of like what is happening with the car hobby.

 

Greg

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The poor man's warbird in the 1960's when I was a kid was the P 40 Warhawk. I used to look through my grandfathers copy's of Trade a Plane; sort of the Hemmings of second hand aircraft, and see the occasional P40 at about $10,000.00 . Quite a bit of money, but conceivably within reach. Surplus Allison's were cheap and quite plentiful.  P 51's were at least $25,000.00 and a lot more expensive to keep in the air.

 Try pricing any of them these days. There is a admittedly much better condition than you would typically find in the 1960's, P 40 currently for sale very near me, " just " 1.5 million U.S.D.. Not much different than Model J Duesenberg's I guess. But unfortunately I don't own one of those either.

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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