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electric clock repair


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4 hours ago, Buick35 said:

Where is a good source to repair a 6 volt electric car clock? Its from my 35 buick.Thanks

I'd be interested in same, although not from a Buick and not necessarily limited to 6 Volt clock.

Most automotive instrument service/restoration providers seem to shun away from clock repairs and usually offer only Quartz conversions instead.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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I had my clock repaired for my 1941 Buick by someone recommended in this forum.  It was guaranteed for one year. guess what? It lasted only 14 months.

I guess I will need to rely on my phone instead.. Good luck. 

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I use Clockworks for all my electric clocks. They do not service spring wind clocks.

Never been disappointed and usually pretty quick.

I just spoke to them and they are currently about 3-4 weeks.

Dennis

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7 hours ago, dl456 said:

I use Clockworks for all my electric clocks. They do not service spring wind clocks.

 

Confusing statement, as most electric car clocks up to the 80s were spring wound! The solenoid winds the spring.

 

You mean Clockworks does not work on fully mechanical spring wound clocks?

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A watchmaker or clocksmith can repair a mechanical clock. Not that those are on every Main Street as they once were.

 

Finding 6v winding solenoids or quartz movements may be tough. 

 

I've kept several electric-wind clocks going for 20+ years by putting a couple drops of Hammond organ tonewheel oil in the works every few years. It doesn't gum up or attract dust like most lightweight household oils. When they finally quit it was because the solenoid had failed or burnt up.

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10 hours ago, rocketraider said:

A watchmaker or clocksmith can repair a mechanical clock. Not that those are on every Main Street as they once were.

 

Finding 6v winding solenoids or quartz movements may be tough. 

 

I've kept several electric-wind clocks going for 20+ years by putting a couple drops of Hammond organ tonewheel oil in the works every few years. It doesn't gum up or attract dust like most lightweight household oils. When they finally quit it was because the solenoid had failed or burnt up.

Can you show the points to oil?

Thanks, Mike 

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I don't have a clock handy, but you want a tiny drop of oil on each gear's shaft bushings, and the same anywhere the gears mesh. I use a round toothpick dipped in the oil to apply the oil to the lubrication points.

 

Key is tiny drops, applied precisely and sparingly.

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