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Is this 1934 Packard correct?


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11 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

 

There are few more like that.   Somebody painted a Model J that combo in the late 80s and lots of guys copied it.  One of them was an older collector I knew and he couldn't be talked out of it.  Guy had some great stuff but wow did he ruin his Duesenberg.  Good thing he had 2 others.

 

 Of course the colour that shows up in a photo can depend I think on the camera, the prevailing lights and maybe the translation to the computer. 

 

These two are the same car I think - two different photographers, both photos from 2018 - 

 

 

34 ADUESY Napier Flkr.jpg

34 Duesenberg Napier 2018 Drivennz.jpg

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And speaking of bizarre colours does anyone know the background to this car? 

 

It is now in New Zealand and as far as I know is owned by the same guy who owns one of the two Duesenbergs I posted. I have an idea he also owns a red Cadillac V-16 phaeton.

 

 

30 CORD L29 Napier 0220 John van den Broek photo.jpg

30 V16CAD not on cj 1220 Art Deco 20.jpg

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Another colour that, to me, doesn't work. I would call that snot green. I have recently been researching Studebaker engine colours and this reminded me, although it is not exact, of the colour used on early Studebaker engines.

 

Apparently a genuine car though, recently imported by a local car dealer who has a small collection of, mostly later, cars. Photo taken April 2020.

 

 

35 c Auburn Paul Kelly Chch fb Leon Sutherland photo fb 0420.jpg

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1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 Pink? - this photo was taken at the February 2020 Art Deco festival in Napier, New Zealand. I presume is a recent import - 

 

 

1DUES Duesenberg Napier 20 Kevin Heyward photo.jpg

I wonder if he also owned the '56 DeSoto in Post #15 here:  

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/general-studebaker-specific-discussion/88642-new-tw-don-t-read-unless-you-have-feb-s-already

 

Craig

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Thanks for copying & pasting the DeSoto photo.  My work computer does not allow downloading, copying images from public forums, and we are blocked from social networking sites.  (Despite the fact our company has Fecesbook page.)

 

In 1963, AMC did offer a two-tone color combination similar.

 

And Studebaker did offer Rose Mist metallic, and GM also offered a similar shade of metallic rose pink:  

 

https://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/forum/your-studebaker-forum/stove-huggers-the-non-studebaker-forum/65073-orphan-of-the-day-07-17-1963-oldsmobile-starfire#post964902

 

Craig

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6 hours ago, Walt G said:

Craig, they want to be noticed, feel important, have people say "who owns that"? , and get recognition any way they can. It is their way to get attention. I would rather be anonymous . If it is a pre WWII era car and historically correct/accurate then just be proud of the fact that you managed to get that car to the way it was new 80-100 years ago.

Would the same people who choose really bright colors for cars like this also own an English Tudor Style house and paint the stucco orange, and the wood trim baby blue and any brick or stonework yellow?

Yes they probably would.🤗

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1 hour ago, nzcarnerd said:

 Pink? - this photo was taken at the February 2020 Art Deco festival in Napier, New Zealand. I presume is a recent import - 

 

 

1DUES Duesenberg Napier 20 Kevin Heyward photo.jpg

 

Good God! 

This poor car just screams "Leopard print fedora, purple fur coat and 4 inch platform boots with 6 of Leroy's painted ho's crammed in the back snorting coke off their 3 inch long fingernails while Rick James belts out Super Freak on the 8 track stereo".

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Back when these prewar cars were new there were individualist who did not conform to societal norms.  However rare these folks were they were around and occasionally bought a car and left their mark on it.   Here is a Citroen C6 back when it was a current model car after is was given a unique paint job by Sonia Delaunay.   I would love to see a color picture of this Citroen.  I am sure if this car showed up at a major car show today it would create an uproar.  

43787DDF-5A7C-4EC8-A913-B2A7CB666BA2.jpeg

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Hopefully not getting too far off topic; - As far as I know this one's (with the plate HN1931) colours are (sort of) correct. It was restored in New Zealand in the 1970s and is still with the same family. I know that in very conservative 1970s New Zealand (remember this was before the technology revolution) the owner was 'not held in high regard' by some. 

 

A google image search for 'plaidside roadster will find a few more in the US.

 

The following was posted on a local facebook page by the son of the 1970s owner - "My father’s 66B Great 6 roadster which he purchased in 1974 from the late Doug Griffin in Ashburton. At the time Ron was working on his 1925 W-K model 65 tourer when he heard of another W-K locally. The tourer has since moved out of the country into Switzerland. The 66B was hand painted in black but still the unique bodylines (by Griswold) stood out. The car was restored by the late Ray Hoskin in Ashburton for $3/hour and finished in time for the 1980 VCC International Rally held at Rotorua. The first photo is from the Griffin family, second pic soon after restoration. The third photo is a car from the US - photo sent over by the WOKR originally showing the outrageous colour scheme that we were led to believe was factory correct during the ‘70s. However now there is dispute over the orange bonnet. We have history of the car dating back to around 1945. Before then is very sketchy but often heard about another roadster potentially being in the Nth Island (never proven however). Fourth pic - period pic of Grace Moore at the wheel of a roadster.  Fifth pic - this beautiful 66B Phaeton resides in the US - 1 of 2 Plaidside phaetons produced. Both still exist."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Steve9 said:

Here’s a couple favorites from JB Nethercutt...

DF12120A-42F9-4FF9-84DB-A654BFEAA2FF.jpeg

6D5E5FEF-D3AC-43FA-827A-CAB58C57F651.jpeg

 

Interesting that you posted the red 1934 LeBaron. I have some Packard literature somewhere that specifically states that "poly" was not available on the LeBarons. Yet, Nethercutts painted theirs with "poly." As for the yellow car, they painted that one to match one of the Packard illustrations. A mistake, in my opinion.

 

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10 minutes ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

This one has been posted here before, it is not horrible but so many other colors would suit it better I think.

20161007_092033.jpg

 

Just my opinion but I think all of those Duesenbergs with later or updated fenders and body styling somehow don't look right. It clashes with the very 1929-30 look of the radiator and head lamps.

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4 minutes ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

Just my opinion but I think all of those Duesenbergs with later or updated fenders and body styling somehow don't look right. It clashes with the very 1929-30 look of the radiator and head lamps.

 

Yup. That was a problem for them definitely. It's what happens when you build all your chassis in one year, then have to fit bodies to them for the next seven years during one of the fastest development periods in automotive history. Some of the custom coachbuilders were quite successful in "streamlining" the old Duesenberg, some... not so much.

 

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I think the subject of what is and what isn't a factory colour can be the subject of some (ongoing?) debate.

 

This is one of several pages extracted from a 1975 issue of the Antique Studebaker Review that attempts to explain the paint schemes available for the 1929-31 era Studebakers. If it was that complicated for what was a middle to upper middle price car imagine what could be had with something more 'high dollar'.

 

I currently have the engine out of mine - to replace the flywheel ring gear and fix the clutch. We painted the engine while it is apart. I am hoping to put it back in this weekend. The fire wall should be brush painted black according to the info but I will leave it as the 1980s restorer did it. One thing I will organise is having the panel insert along the upper door painted in the same ivory colour as the wheels and in the future have the upper mouldings pin striped.

 

 

 

 

143761465_424516895555084_7934059006212906240_o.jpg

IMG_0547 resize.JPG

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This was an interesting case--I remember this car (and I'm sure AJ knows it well) when it passed through the shop where I was working. There it is, in the brochure, in purple, so they painted this one purple during the restoration.


Were any built in that color? Unlikely. But there it is nonetheless. Nobody can claim the factory didn't intend for there to be a purple Reo Royale convertible coupe...

 

https://cdn.dealeraccelerate.com/rkm/1/1898/112927/1920x1440/w/1931-reo-royale

 

1931-reo-royale

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35 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Vegas trip 297.jpg

This Lincoln model L Coaching Brougham by Judkins was restored by Harrah's some years( decades?) ago. It was shown at several of the custom body salons , and I know was shown at the NY Salon. It was done by Judkins to draw attention to their exhibit stand. Colors reflect what a horse drawn "coaching brougham" would look like - the comparison of a horse drawn carriage to a motor car chassis. I have the original rendering/painting  of this car done by Roland Stickney - done in opaque water color ( tempra paint kids use in Elementary school) The rendering is about 2 feet wide and Stickney the artist was so good he even pin striped the car with a very very fine brush! It was his rendering that was used in an advertisement that Judkins took out in the Salon souvenir catalogs. When the car was on display in the salon it was not under the lighting conditions you see here . The original rendering was found in a shop in Connecticut by a close friend of mine about 40+ years ago who called me and said " do you want it". I bought it sight unseen, and it hangs in my library and I see it everyday.

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R Stickney was a great artist. He did more to illustrate and design cars than most people realize. He is one of the forgotten self taught geniuses of the Classic Era.

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In regards to the LeBaron speedster with the painted shell headlight buckets, rad louvers and tail light stanchions, it is not a fake.  The car resides in the Lee collection in Nevada.  At one time Mr Lee had two of the originals.  I must confess that even conservative Packard executives got it wrong when it came to colour!  The grey LeBaron sport Phaeton in the photo beside also resides in the Lee collection.  The four originals were on display at Pebble many years ago.    The darker green speedster with the wheel discs is a Fran Roxas rebody.

DSCF1875s.jpg

Screen Shot 2014-04-16 at 9.14.10 AM.png

DSCF1872s.jpg

Edited by packard12man (see edit history)
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(Clarification, The purple Reo Royale Matt refers to.) 

 

If they actually wanted the car in the artist's rendition, they would have had to chop the thing up into little pieces and put it together about three inches lower and at least two feet longer!

 

It has been asked if anyone has seen an original early 1930s classic in original paint such a bad color choice? It was so long ago, I don't recall a lot of details, but I did see such a car. At a show, very original, probably 1930 to '32. I am not sure, but it may have been a Packard, and it was probably a touring car. A lousy sort-of lime green. Definitely not common, but it was done. I also remember reading an article almost fifty years ago. It was in an early issue of the "Car Classics" magazine. The article was about the restoration of the surviving one of a short run of custom built sportscars. The fellow restoring the car had documented proof that the car had been painted pink originally. A chunk of the article was devoted to his difficult choice to paint it in the original color. 

However, just because a few odd people did something a bit crazy (borderline stupid?), doesn't mean that a hundred people today should follow each one of those crazy people's ideas.

Historic preservation and restoration is and should be about keeping things the way they really were. Not about a today individual's demented idea of something that 'could have been' done.

I see these ridiculous (Sheldon! Why don't you tell us how you really feel?) color choices along the same lines as people putting wire wheels on their brass era model T Fords. Were wire wheels available for the model T during the brass era? Yes, there were several companies that offered to make and fit wire wheels onto any car in that era. Were wire wheels actually installed on model T Fords in the T's brass era? Again, yes, some. But how many?

Nobody kept such records for what is in fact a minor detail (it is a minor detail because it was done so rarely). Especially since the small companies that offered them probably didn't keep accurate records themselves, and most of any records those companies did keep were likely lost nearly a century ago.

But I have closely examined era photographs for more than fifty years now. I wish I could say I kept full and accurate records of everything I have seen. But I didn't, for a lot of reasons. I would estimate that of the literally thousands of era (when the car was new or only a couple years old) photographs I have looked at closely over the years? I may have seen after-market wire wheels (that excludes the welded wire wheels Ford offered in 1926/'27) on different model T fords of any year for maybe as many as about thirty cars. For actual model Ts in the brass era? I think I have seen photos of about maybe ten different cars. One of those cars was Edsel Ford's 1915 customized touring car. They (he and his friends in two other cars) left Michigan with five wire wheels on on his model T. By the time they arrived at the world's fair in San Francisco, the model T had four wooden spoke wheels on it. I guess the wire wheels looked better than they worked on the bad roads of the day. There many photos taken of that one model T, and nearly a dozen different photos of it show up all over the internet and in hobby magazines from before I was born! But it is only ONE model T Ford.

Probably at least two thirds of the remaining brass era model T photos showing wire wheels on the cars? Are European, English, or British colonial model Ts. Their world was a bit different than it was on our American continent. They didn't have the special wood resources to make millions of wooden spoke wheels, so they adopted steel disc and steel wire spoke wheels well before America did. Model T Fords were manufactured in England and Europe even during the brass era, and their cars were a bit different. The bodies were much nicer, more fancy by standards then and now. A lot of those did have wire wheels. Australian and New Zealand model Ts were mostly exported out of Canada, with wooden spoke wheels. However, the British colonial culture favored wire wheels to some extent. Given the higher cost of the car due to shipping, adding local wire wheels was common. THERE.

I suspect that there are more 'brass era' model Ts together and drivable (or nearly so?) today than there were during the brass era.

 

I should add as an additional clarification, that my diatribe also was not intended to include speedsters or racing cars. Wire wheels were often used on those. But they were not often used on the family car. Not in the USA.

 

I guess the mindset for the color choices is the same. If five people did it originally when there were thousands of cars? Justifies a hundred people doing so today with the few that are left? (Okay, numerical non sequitur, but I think you get the idea?)

Edited by wayne sheldon
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I’ve worked in the restoration business with some very talented guys and gals.

 

Guess it’s an old saying, but one of them, looking at a newly restored car, stated “well, paint is only temporary”....

 

So, who cares, an odd paint job will either wow a new owner, or, with new owners of high end cars, just be a temporary thing....but if there weren’t these odd jobs, we’d have no fun criticizing them!

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9 hours ago, Walt G said:

Craig, they want to be noticed, feel important, have people say "who owns that"? , and get recognition any way they can. It is their way to get attention. I would rather be anonymous . If it is a pre WWII era car and historically correct/accurate then just be proud of the fact that you managed to get that car to the way it was new 80-100 years ago.

Would the same people who choose really bright colors for cars like this also own an English Tudor Style house and paint the stucco orange, and the wood trim baby blue and any brick or stonework yellow?

That craving attention is as unattractive as the paint on some of these cars. Not sure why people do it. Reminds me of the celebrations in football games today for just about anything. I like the old school approach that is more subdued. Thinking about those dramatic football celebrations reminds me of a John Madden quote from years ago doing color commentary for an nfl game. I think Pat Summerall was with him. Barry Sanders had just done some crazy long touchdown run where virtually every player on the other team couldn’t bring him down. It was a feat that would have been the greatest run of your career for most other running backs. After getting into the end zone, he nonchalantly jogged over with the ball, handed it to the official with no emotion or celebration, and jogged over towards his sideline. Madden doing the game said “Pat, did you see Barry after he got into the end zone and scored?  He acted like he’s been there before....  and knows he’s coming back”.....

 

relative to showing off and big egos, I always loved that quote. 

 

 

Edited by John Bloom (see edit history)
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31 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

(Clarification, The purple Reo Royale Matt refers to.) 

 

If they actually wanted the car in the artist's rendition, they would have had to chop the thing up into little pieces and put it together about three inches lower and at least two feet longer!

 

It has been asked if anyone has seen an original early 1930s classic in original paint such a bad color choice? It was so long ago, I don't recall a lot of details, but I did see such a car. At a show, very original, probably 1930 to '32. I am not sure, but it may have been a Packard, and it was probably a touring car. A lousy sort-of lime green. Definitely not common, but it was done. I also remember reading an article almost fifty years ago. It was in an early issue of the "Car Classics" magazine. The article was about the restoration of the surviving one of a short run of custom built sportscars. The fellow restoring the car had documented proof that the car had been painted pink originally. A chunk of the article was devoted to his difficult choice to paint it in the original color. 

However, just because a few odd people did something a bit crazy (borderline stupid?), doesn't mean that a hundred people today should follow each one of those crazy people's ideas.

Historic preservation and restoration is and should be about keeping things the way they really were. Not about a today individual's demented idea of something that 'could have been' done.

I see these ridiculous (Sheldon! Why don't you tell us how you really feel?) color choices along the same lines as people putting wire wheels on their brass era model T Fords. Were wire wheels available for the model T during the brass era? Yes, there were several companies that offered to make and fit wire wheels onto any car in that era. Were wire wheels actually installed on model T Fords in the T's brass era? Again, yes, some. But how many?

Nobody kept such records for what is in fact a minor detail (it is a minor detail because it was done so rarely). Especially since the small companies that offered them probably didn't keep accurate records themselves, and most of any records those companies did keep were likely lost nearly a century ago.

But I have closely examined era photographs for more than fifty years now. I wish I could say I kept full and accurate records of everything I have seen. But I didn't, for a lot of reasons. I would estimate that of the literally thousands of era (when the car was new or only a couple years old) photographs I have looked at closely over the years? I may have seen after-market wire wheels (that excludes the welded wire wheels Ford offered in 1926/'27) on different model T fords of any year for maybe as many as about thirty cars. For actual model Ts in the brass era? I think I have seen photos of about maybe ten different cars. One of those cars was Edsel Ford's 1915 customized touring car. They (he and his friends in two other cars) left Michigan with five wire wheels on on his model T. By the time they arrived at the world's fair in San Francisco, the model T had four wooden spoke wheels on it. I guess the wire wheels looked better than they worked on the bad roads of the day. There many photos taken of that one model T, and nearly a dozen different photos of it show up all over the internet and in hobby magazines from before I was born! But it is only ONE model T Ford.

Probably at least two thirds of the remaining brass era model T photos showing wire wheels on the cars? Are European, English, or British colonial model Ts. Their world was a bit different than it was on our American continent. They didn't have the special wood resources to make millions of wooden spoke wheels, so they adopted steel disc and steel wire spoke wheels well before America did. Model T Fords were manufactured in England and Europe even during the brass era, and their cars were a bit different. The bodies were much nicer, more fancy by standards then and now. A lot of those did have wire wheels. Australian and New Zealand model Ts were mostly exported out of Canada, with wooden spoke wheels. However, the British colonial culture favored wire wheels to some extent. Given the higher cost of the car due to shipping, adding local wire wheels was common. THERE.

I suspect that there are more 'brass era' model Ts together and drivable (or nearly so?) today than there were during the brass era.

 

I guess the mindset for the color choices is the same. If five people did it originally when there were thousands of cars? Justifies a hundred people doing so today with the few that are left? (Okay, numerical non sequitur, but I think you get the idea?)

 

I think there is no doubt that the vast majority of American cars were fitted with wood wheels in the pre 1929 era. As you say the wire wheels fitted to Ford were aftermarket. I don't know any details of T in this photo but it was taken at the local agent's premises in about 1914 - 

14 c Model T Ford Henry J Ranger.jpg

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36 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

(Clarification, The purple Reo Royale Matt refers to.) 

 

If they actually wanted the car in the artist's rendition, they would have had to chop the thing up into little pieces and put it together about three inches lower and at least two feet longer!

 

It has been asked if anyone has seen an original early 1930s classic in original paint such a bad color choice? It was so long ago, I don't recall a lot of details, but I did see such a car. At a show, very original, probably 1930 to '32. I am not sure, but it may have been a Packard, and it was probably a touring car. A lousy sort-of lime green. Definitely not common, but it was done. I also remember reading an article almost fifty years ago. It was in an early issue of the "Car Classics" magazine. The article was about the restoration of the surviving one of a short run of custom built sportscars. The fellow restoring the car had documented proof that the car had been painted pink originally. A chunk of the article was devoted to his difficult choice to paint it in the original color. 

However, just because a few odd people did something a bit crazy (borderline stupid?), doesn't mean that a hundred people today should follow each one of those crazy people's ideas.

Historic preservation and restoration is and should be about keeping things the way they really were. Not about a today individual's demented idea of something that 'could have been' done.

I see these ridiculous (Sheldon! Why don't you tell us how you really feel?) color choices along the same lines as people putting wire wheels on their brass era model T Fords. Were wire wheels available for the model T during the brass era? Yes, there were several companies that offered to make and fit wire wheels onto any car in that era. Were wire wheels actually installed on model T Fords in the T's brass era? Again, yes, some. But how many?

Nobody kept such records for what is in fact a minor detail (it is a minor detail because it was done so rarely). Especially since the small companies that offered them probably didn't keep accurate records themselves, and most of any records those companies did keep were likely lost nearly a century ago.

But I have closely examined era photographs for more than fifty years now. I wish I could say I kept full and accurate records of everything I have seen. But I didn't, for a lot of reasons. I would estimate that of the literally thousands of era (when the car was new or only a couple years old) photographs I have looked at closely over the years? I may have seen after-market wire wheels (that excludes the welded wire wheels Ford offered in 1926/'27) on different model T fords of any year for maybe as many as about thirty cars. For actual model Ts in the brass era? I think I have seen photos of about maybe ten different cars. One of those cars was Edsel Ford's 1915 customized touring car. They (he and his friends in two other cars) left Michigan with five wire wheels on on his model T. By the time they arrived at the world's fair in San Francisco, the model T had four wooden spoke wheels on it. I guess the wire wheels looked better than they worked on the bad roads of the day. There many photos taken of that one model T, and nearly a dozen different photos of it show up all over the internet and in hobby magazines from before I was born! But it is only ONE model T Ford.

Probably at least two thirds of the remaining brass era model T photos showing wire wheels on the cars? Are European, English, or British colonial model Ts. Their world was a bit different than it was on our American continent. They didn't have the special wood resources to make millions of wooden spoke wheels, so they adopted steel disc and steel wire spoke wheels well before America did. Model T Fords were manufactured in England and Europe even during the brass era, and their cars were a bit different. The bodies were much nicer, more fancy by standards then and now. A lot of those did have wire wheels. Australian and New Zealand model Ts were mostly exported out of Canada, with wooden spoke wheels. However, the British colonial culture favored wire wheels to some extent. Given the higher cost of the car due to shipping, adding local wire wheels was common. THERE.

I suspect that there are more 'brass era' model Ts together and drivable (or nearly so?) today than there were during the brass era.

 

I guess the mindset for the color choices is the same. If five people did it originally when there were thousands of cars? Justifies a hundred people doing so today with the few that are left? (Okay, numerical non sequitur, but I think you get the idea?)

 

Dodge and Hupmobile were two that offered wire wheels for a few years post WW1. Looks to be some Hupps being prepared for sale here circa 1917 - 

 

In the second photo maybe an Oldsmobile on wires? - 

 

 

17 poss Christchurch, Farmers Co op Garage Hupmobiles.jpg

17 poss Christchurch, Farmers garage prob - with Hupmobiles 1217.jpg

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OK, here is a photo of the original painting by Roland Stickney of the Lincoln model L Coaching Brougham that is in my collection. As mentioned it was this rendering that was used by Judkins in their advertisements in the salon catalogs and I believe Lincoln also used the same artwork in its sales catalog or portfolio in the same year. It is under glass in a frame thus the glare from the glass reflecting in the photo. As Ed Minnie mentions , Roland Stickney is one of the giants at that time that is given little notice or credit for his incredible talent and artwork. This was all done with paint and brush - no photos, computer generated assistance etc etc. Just a down right talented illustrator and artist. I have studied this original art for days ( I was an art teacher and have a Masters degree+ in art) and I am in total amazement as to the accuracy and quality. even the wood wheels are pin striped in the rendering.

Stickneyrendering.jpg

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3 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Green theme, continued..

 

I would love to see this car in the darker shade with only the beltline in the lighter green as an accent.

20181013_105254.jpg

This car looks similar to one I remember a friend of my fathers had. He had a collection of several Packards. He was what we would call a 'good ole boy' that owned a large construction company. Had very little formal education but worked hard and was very successful. I believe he had 5 or 6 cars, the only one that wasnt green was a yellow roadster that he drove on a regular basis. His house was green, his work trucks were green his warehouse was green. He always said green was his favorite colour, 'the colour of money'!

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17 minutes ago, John Bloom said:

That craving attention is as unattractive as the paint on some of these cars. Not sure why people do it. Reminds me of the celebrations in football games today for just about anything. I like the old school approach that is more subdued. Thinking about those dramatic football celebrations reminds me of a John Madden quote from years ago doing color commentary for an nfl game. I think Pat Summerall was with him. Barry Sanders had just done some crazy long touchdown run where virtually every player on the other team couldn’t bring him down. It was a feat that would have been the greatest run of your career for most other running backs. After getting into the end zone, he nonchalantly jogged over with the ball, handed it to the official with no emotion or celebration, and jogged over towards his sideline. Madden doing the game said “Pat, did you see Barry after he got into the end zone and scored?  He acted like he’s been there before....  and knows he’s coming back”.....

 

relative to showing off and big egos, I always loved that quote. 

 

 

Great story.  A job to do, he did it, and handled it well.

 

 My best friend here in Virginia and I were moving some old cars around at his garage.  We looked up, and a squirrel was skittering along a power line.

 

”Amazing how they can do that”, he commented.  Why, I asked?  It’s his job that he’s trained his whole life for....

 

I feel the same way when a professional athlete goes overboard celebrating.  Take your victories quietly, people will notice regardless..

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2 minutes ago, Walt G said:

OK, here is a photo of the original painting by Roland Stickney of the Lincoln model L Coaching Brougham that is in my collection. As mentioned it was this rendering that was used by Judkins in their advertisements in the salon catalogs and I believe Lincoln also used the same artwork in its sales catalog or portfolio in the same year. It is under glass in a frame thus the glare from the glass reflecting in the photo. As Ed Minnie mentions , Roland Stickney is one of the giants at that time that is given little notice or credit for his incredible talent and artwork. This was all done with paint and brush - no photos, computer generated assistance etc etc. Just a down right talented illustrator and artist. I have studied this original art for days ( I was an art teacher and have a Masters degree+ in art) and I am in total amazement as to the accuracy and quality. even the wood wheels are pin striped in the rendering.

Stickneyrendering.jpg

Fabulous piece of artwork, I have always marveled at the people who can see things, either real or in their mind, and transfer that vision to canvas...

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David, I was amazed that the artwork even existed. It's usefulness was to supply a picture for an advertisement and a sales piece. Where it remained from 1927 until I got it is unknown. there is some slight water stain to the upper right corner, must have been in a damp area at some point. Some generations of people admired the illustration as much as we do now and saved it. The 1920s-early 1930s was the Renascence of the age of Illustrators for everything, was the last gasp before the mega use of color photography came to be popular ( and was much faster to have for publication) .

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2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

This was an interesting case--I remember this car (and I'm sure AJ knows it well) when it passed through the shop where I was working. There it is, in the brochure, in purple, so they painted this one purple during the restoration.


Were any built in that color? Unlikely. But there it is nonetheless. Nobody can claim the factory didn't intend for there to be a purple Reo Royale convertible coupe...

 

https://cdn.dealeraccelerate.com/rkm/1/1898/112927/1920x1440/w/1931-reo-royale

 

1931-reo-royale


Matt, I’m friendly with the seller who inherited that car (and others) from his dad.  Nice guy.  That car was almost sale proof.   It ended up in Europe.

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18 minutes ago, alsancle said:


Matt, I’m friendly with the seller who inherited that car (and others) from his dad.  Nice guy.  That car was almost sale proof.   It ended up in Europe.

 

Man, I would have taken that car without a second thought, purple or not. Loved it!

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3 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

 

Just my opinion but I think all of those Duesenbergs with later or updated fenders and body styling somehow don't look right. It clashes with the very 1929-30 look of the radiator and head lamps.

 

This car (J-365) was was originally light colors,  then painted black in period as it did the concours circuit in France.

 

EDIT:  I added a picture of it in its current "rose" colors so you know I'm talking about the same car.

 

Image result for duesenberg J-365

https://s35.wheelsage.org/format/picture/picture-thumb-medium/d/duesenberg/j_365_2385_sunroof_sedan_lwb_by_franay/duesenberg_j_365_2385_sunroof_sedan_lwb_by_franay.jpg

5777_1.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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1 minute ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Man, I would have taken that car without a second thought, purple or not. Loved it!

 

There are 9 known convertible coupes.    This one was for sale for a long time and found a home with another forum member.   It sold for much less than the purple car so that was your chance.


The greens were not great colors but way better than the purple.

 

The Dietrich Royale was actually painted these colors new for the NY Auto show season,  then the fenders were painted body color to sell the car. 

 

IMG_6136.jpg

ReoRoyale-Dietrich-1980s-Web.jpg

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