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1910 Maytag Mason project car


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Hi, I have the partial remains of 3 1910 Maytag Mason cars, as well as one restored 1910 Maytag Model C.  I can't really start on the projects yet because  I don't have an engine and transmission. So if anyone has any suggestions as to what I should do, I'd like to hear them.

 

Thanks, 

Joel

right front maytag project.jpg

left front maytag project.jpg

783.jpg

Edited by Hemi Joel (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, dalef62 said:

Electrify it...   Lol

 

To be honest, with the remains of one of the chassis he has, that may not be a bad idea.  I'm not endorsing that plan, but just saying its not the worst idea I've heard today.  And I watched a video with a Dodge Hellcat sporting Amish buggy wheels today.  

 

My suggestion is just to start with an inventory, decide if there will be multiple cars built out of the parts, or combine them.  Then restore what you have and try to add parts as you go along.  Make sure you have a firm plan first though, I haven't in the past and its cost me dearly.  

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My opinion is you should restore the chassis find a period correct engine and then instead of making a body just make a truck out of it. If miraculously you find a original engine or a original body then switch it over if not then you have a really cool vintage truck. In the depression era they would make trucks out of anything they could find so it would seem authentic. It would be great if someone somewhere has parts for these cars then it would be great to restore them to original. 

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Joel,

 

That's a neat and worthy project! I went and did a little research - With the Duesenberg brothers involved as well as Maytag of appliance fame - its has a neat history.

 

I am assuming with the brothers involved the engine was unique and not proprietary? Photos? I am sure there is something out there that 

while not correct to the car would be correct for the period. Please keep us posted!

 

Best regards,

Terry

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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You guys have some great ideas, thanks! Building a truck body from scratch out of wood would be a lot simpler than building a car body, and it would be pretty cool. Maytag did build c-cab trucks. The Mason / Maytag two-cylinder engine is unique. It was not used in any other car. It was a two-cylinder, horizontally opposed, 5-in bore x 5-in stroke with push rod operated overhead valves. Chances are there's one out there somewhere. But finding one would be a miracle. If anybody has any leads, I would definitely follow up on them.

What other two cylinder horizontally opposed engines were out there during that era that might be more common? Finding a similar, era correct engine and adapting it in there might be the only option. And if anything would spur a miraculous find of an original engine, it would be to adapt a different engine into the chassis! just about the time I tightened the last bolt and got it started, the real engine would show up. (:

Maytag-1911-2.jpg

Maytag-1911.jpg

Edited by Hemi Joel (see edit history)
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On 1/31/2021 at 12:29 PM, Hemi Joel said:

You guys have some great ideas, thanks! Building a truck body from scratch out of wood would be a lot simpler than building a car body, and it would be pretty cool. Maytag did build c-cab trucks. The Mason / Maytag two-cylinder engine is unique. It was not used in any other car. It was a two-cylinder, horizontally opposed, 5-in bore x 5-in stroke with push rod operated overhead valves. Chances are there's one out there somewhere. But finding one would be a miracle. If anybody has any leads, I would definitely follow up on them.

What other two cylinder horizontally opposed engines were out there during that era that might be more common? Finding a similar, era correct engine and adapting it in there might be the only option. And if anything would spur a miraculous find of an original engine, it would be to adapt a different engine into the chassis! just about the time I tightened the last bolt and got it started, the real engine would show up. 🙂

Maytag-1911-2.jpg

Maytag-1911.jpg


I think that would be an awesome project!  I wish there were more trucks out there of this era. 

Edited by AURktman (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Laverne Burt of Gorham Maine has been gone for probably 15 years now.  He had at one time 1 1/2 Mason chassis and I'm presuming that you have his projects.  He had a replacement 2 cylinder and a line on a transmission, I presume that too might have been a replacement.  When the projects sold I was quite surprised to see the new owners advertise and sell the engine.  Laverne looked long and hard for a Mason engine and never found one.  I hope that minimum you find a great replacement engine and continue with the project.   With an original automobile, you have more opportunity for duplicating accurate parts than most people would.  Thank you for sharing your project with us.

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Hello Joel,

 

Plugged in Maytag into my old computer email and I have the name of the guy who bought Laverne's stuff.  I bought a spring off the guy and inquired about the axles in the photo he sent me evidently on the spring.  That was back in 2011.  So drop me a line in the private messages.  A gentleman with the same name was still listed in a couple year old HCCA roster and he was out of California.  Worth a try if he's not the guy you got your stuff from.

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You have a huge advantage in having an intact car to work from. It might not be cost feasible however you could use your existing engine as a pattern to build a new engine.

It's been done before . And your Mason is a reasonably simple engine  { as these things go }. If you make the investment in casting patterns it might make the restoration of other engineless Mason's possible as well. Factory original parts are wonderful, but on such a rare car modern replacements might be the only option.

 

Greg

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  • 3 weeks later...

I believe it was Beaver that made a two cylinder, horizontally opposed, motor that was used up into the 20s on railroad inspection cars. I see them regularly at hit n miss engine shows and some have been adapted to early two cylinder cars that were missing motors, so yours would not be the first. Whether it has the correct motor or not is not as important, in my view, as having a car representing a unique obscure company. Once the car is restored, or at least put back together in some form of originality, correct parts may be found or fabricated to replace incorrect.

 

You could keep an eye out on the HAMB website for one of these two cylinder inspection car motors.

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