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1969 Oldsmobile 442 4-speed *SOLD*


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*SOLD* I'm typically immune to the charms of muscle cars, although I'll admit that a few have tempted me (that all-original triple black 1966 Impala SS427 we found in a shed haunts me frequently, and I have purchased several thousand tickets to win back the 1969 Hurst/Olds I sold a few months ago). This very handsome Olds 442 is on the cusp simply because it's one sweetheart of a car. Matching numbers, 4-speed, decent documents, and an oddball color combination that appeals to my sense of the unusual. Oh, and I was able to sneak out for a quick drive when the roads were dry and largely salt-free on Monday and discovered that it's just a fantastic driver. Shockingly smooth, competent, and comfortable, yet with 3.91 gears also VERY punchy. At idle, it's so smooth and quiet you might be forgiven for trying to start the engine again--yes, it's really that docile. The restoration is probably 10-12 years old at this point, but it was very, very well done and I can find very few nits to pick. The Saffron paint with black GT stripes and vinyl top is how it was delivered new and I'm always a sucker for yellow cars. It's a soft yellow, not in-your-face, which seems right for Oldsmobile's grown-up muscle car. Bodywork is very straight and I can find no evidence of wholesale panel replacement or patchwork, so it was either a really, really clean car or someone did some excellent work (or both). No issues today beyond a few very, very minor signs of having been driven and you should hear how nicely those doors close! I really don't think it has much use on it since it was completed, a few thousand miles at most. Chrome, emblems, glass, lenses, all excellent and it's even carrying a full set of T3 headlights! It's just a really nice car.

 

The weird code 934 Gold bucket seat interior makes this car stand out--that's exactly how it was ordered new (it was 1969, after all). Fully restored, it uses correct materials and patterns to look like new and I'm glad they didn't change it to black like most guys would have. It's light on options, but the important stuff is there: M21 close-ratio 4-speed manual gearbox, console, and U21 Rocket Rally Pac gauges with a tick-tock-tach (the tach works but sadly the tick-tock part doesn't). The 3.91 gears on a limited slip out back suggest this car was built for combat, but the luxurious feel, heavy sound deadening, and really quiet, smooth road manners suggest it's only doing so under protest. Door panels, dash, steering wheel, and carpets all match extremely well, so this must have been an expensive interior to restore. The only non-stock part is the later AM/FM stereo radio in the dash, but it blends in pretty nicely and sounds good through original-style speakers in the stock locations. The trunk is outfitted with a correct mat, full-sized spare on an SSI wheel, and a factory jack assembly, along with various warning labels.

 

The engine is the original, numbers-matching 400 cubic inch V8 that was standard equipment in the 442. Equipped with correct C heads and a 7029253 UC Quadra-Jet carb, someone got the important stuff right. It's wearing a correct red air cleaner and Oldsmobile Bronze engine enamel and little stuff like the hose clamps, decals, and even the fill sticker on the radiator cap make it look authentic. It starts easily, idles so smoothly you can't feel or hear it, and with those short gears you'd better believe it yanks the Holiday Coupe around with vigor. Clutch take-up is easy and light, the numbers-matching 4-speed has a standard Hurst linkage so it racks through the gears like a bolt-action rifle—it's almost impossible to stall this sucker. The undercarriage is super clean, although they undercoated it at some point so it's not quite what you need to win the top trophies, but for most events it's more than adequate. On the other hand, everything is new: exhaust, suspension, bearings, brakes, lines, hoses, and gas tank, so it's ready for anything. Power steering and brakes make it easy to handle and it sits on modern 205/70/14 radials, but the brochure shows the 442 on redlines and I think a set of those would make this car just about perfect.

 

Documentation is pretty good, including reproduction manuals, window sticker, some service books, technical manuals, period advertising, and a show board detailing all the hardware under the skin. I don't know if it's worth anything, but this car won its class at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Concours d'Elegance in 2011.

 

I've scaled back the number of cars that I list on this site for various reasons, but this car hits such a sweet spot between great to drive, strong pedigree, and reasonable price that I figured someone here would be savvy enough to get on board quickly. It's surely able to still collect some big awards short of a Grand National, but on the road is where it really shines. Like I said, this one is a real sweetheart. Price is $42,900 but for my AACA friends, something in the high $30s would own it. That's a WHOLE LOT of car for the money right there. Thanks for looking!

 

PS: Sorry the photos aren't as good as they usually are--I'm acting as photographer, detailer, and head mechanic these days as we have a bunch of guys out sick. I took these photos with my cell phone. LOL!

 

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Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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AJ has money burning a hole in his pocket........I'm gonna order tires fort the SK so he's broke and won't buy this thing. Neat car........

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22 minutes ago, edinmass said:

AJ has money burning a hole in his pocket........I'm gonna order tires fort the SK so he's broke and won't buy this thing. Neat car........

 

Who do you think I contacted the minute this thing rolled off the trailer?

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Matt you do find some wonderful cars. This color looks to be a close match to the 68 GM Safari yellow I painted my Formula "S" Barracuda. Love that color. 

If this car is around in a week from now I'd be really surprised.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Matt Harwood changed the title to 1969 Oldsmobile 442 4-speed *SOLD*

Two guys fighting over it, too. Good stuff priced right never sticks around long. I probably could have squeezed another $5000 out of it if I was willing to work it and wait 5 months. I'd rather sell more cars than hold out for absolute top dollar on most of them. Turning over the inventory is the best way to sell more cars.

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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  • 8 months later...

Hi Matt,

                        I know this is an old thread but I stumbled across it when searching for '69 442 images.

I finally got my T-bird out of paint jail a couple weeks ago and started the reassembly.  Complete brakes and suspension are finished and rebuilt engine is installed but, as you can see, there

is still a long way to go.   A friend contacted me a couple days ago, wants the car and offered to trade his 1969 (real) 442 which is very similar looking to the one you have posted here.  It is also Saffron Yellow but with black interior, same hood stripes, no vinyl roof, automatic trans with buckets and console, correct wheels.  He's owned the car for almost 30 years.  It is partially disassembled (original engine has been rebuilt but not installed, interior, etc.) but it's all there and a clean, rust free southern California car it's whole life.  He's a hands-on kind of guy who can finish the T-bird reassembly and I think he's just lost his motivation on the Olds.

I like this era Cutlass and, like you, I have a thing for the odd ball colors.  I'm totally OD'd on Red, Blue, Black muscle cars and particularly like this Yellow/Black combination.  I'm not married to the T-bird so I think I'll pursue this.  I believe the 442 market is stronger than the early T-bird market today.  Do you agree?

Cheers, Greg

 

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Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
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I think the Olds is a more marketable car and likely a more valuable car than the T-Bird, depending on condition. Automatic transmission will put a pretty hard cap on the 442's values, but if you enjoy it and want the car, then go for it. My feelings on 2-seat 'Birds are pretty well documented (I won't sell them) and I think the Olds/Buick A-bodies are under-rated in terms of performance/comfort and value. They're great drivers. If the Olds is numbers-matching, so much the better. If not, I might hesitate but again, if you like the car then that's the right reason to go for it.

 

If you like the 442 more than the 'Bird and the finish line is the same distance away, then I'd say that's your answer.

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Thanks Matt, I think you've confirmed what I suspected.  I just needed a credible sounding board I suppose.

This may seem odd and I cannot explain why but I'm just not warming up to the T-bird. It's also a clean, rust free SoCal car, original Raven black with hardtop.  I usually enjoy spending as much time as possible in my garage doing this sort of work (when I'm not at my other work) and get excited with the progress but, for some reason, this car is not giving me that same satisfaction.

 

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