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Starting Restoration on a 1926 EP Studebaker Sport Roadster


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Have lots of data on the EP roadsters. Owned one for many years. Have no parts but just about every piece of literature ever issued. Let me know what you need.

my 26 big 6 email.jpg

26 big 6 rdstr girls.jpg

25-26 EP engine water header info.jpg

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Incidentally the casting number E-12-9 would indicate your car's engine ENGINE block was cast on December 9, 1925. So your car was probably assembled within 30 days after that. Serial number range was 2060001 to 2102300; engine number range EP-1 TO EP-48050. 

Edited by studeq (see edit history)
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4 minutes ago, Brian Brewer said:

So, It is a 25?

Not necessarily, my Studebaker is titled as a 1938 and the build sheet says it was created August 27, 1937. If you have the title go by that not when a part was produced. 
dave s 

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Great car worthy of any work that needs to be done.

My advise is get a few big note binders and make up all major catagories with sub catagories like"chassis"broken down to axles and wheels,brakes etc..Motor / transmission..get it.

Start reviewing the car on what it needs in work,whats missing and make notations..in detail.

Begin searching out suppliers for various parts and sundries and write them down .and note what you may need from that company.

Make a seperated parts wanted list..

Have a section for specialized contacts as you find them for rebuilding things you may need to send out.

List speciality tools you made need as you go.

Be diligent about keeping notes on specifactions as you find them.

I think by now you get the picture.

 

Also start taking tons of photos before and during work and get prints made of important areas. 

 

When taking anything apart get use to labling and organizing everything as you go and make simple diagrams of how things go together if not super obvious to even an idiot.

 

Keep a good diary of all expenses. Right down to a cheap 60 cent paint brush ,50 cent sheet of sandpaper and the 2.bucks for stupid 1/4-20 machine screws.

 

Don't throw out anything but the old rotten tires for now.. A scrap of top material or running board cover you may need for matching.Lol.

 

Good luck

 

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May be a good thing to retitle this thread/post as to the make of car?? not all of us are familiar with what specific model designations are for all makes of cars.  If more people start to list cars as a : Speedway, series 16-b, Aero type 4, monastella, Larchmont, etc. it may start to have some viewers not bother to look at what is on the post??

Not a complaint, just a suggestion to be a bit more specific and mention the make.🥴

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5 minutes ago, Walt G said:

May be a good thing to retitle this thread/post as to the make of car?? not all of us are familiar with what specific model designations are for all makes of cars.  If more people start to list cars as a : Speedway, series 16-b, Aero type 4, monastella, Larchmont, etc. it may start to have some viewers not bother to look at what is on the post??

Not a complaint, just a suggestion to be a bit more specific and mention the make.🥴

Right on Walt. I only looked because I wondered what kind of electric vehicle it might be. 

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As for model year, likely a 1926 based on engine date. Manufacturers typically set up their plants for the production of next years models in about August/September of preceding year. So an Engine manufactured in Dec 1925 would normally be for a 1926 Model. Looks like a greast project, pretty complete and good sheet metal. Good Luck. 

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Congratulations!  You have one of the most capable mid-1920's cars, the first time you drive it you will be amazed.  Just the spec's tells us this was exceptional for a middle-priced car: 3 7/8" X 5" 354 ci. Big Six, 75 hp in a 3,500 lbs roadster.  In that era, torque @ rpm was a more valid method to judge performance capability.  Others can give you driver seat perspectives, though it should be quite satisfying.  A member in The Antique Studebaker Club is recommend. 

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  • Brian Brewer changed the title to Starting Restoration on a 1926 EP Studebaker Sport Roadster

Hi Brian, great acquisition. I am also involved in this type of journey. I own a 1926 Big Six, roadster, similar to yours. My car needs complete restauration, it has true disc wheels and hydraulic brakes. It will be great to exchange our learnings. I am still searching for some missing parts. Regards, Julio 

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Sending a PM to @studeq would be the best place to start with your questions regarding number of cars remaining.

Also, join the Studebaker club, tons of helpful people and information there.

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I like flivrkings suggestions. I will add, when bagging small parts write the label on a piece of paper and put it in the bag. At one time I put the stuff in ziplock bags, wrote the contents with a sharpie on the bag. After laying in a box full of these for several years it go to point that the writing had worn off the bags making identification somewhat tricky. Also, a brother p touch for creating instant labels is ideal. Unplug a wire, print a label where it went. Same for brake line, fuel line, etc. etc.

 

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This is our 1926 Studebaker EP Big Six Roadster. My father spent 27 years putting it back together and my wife and I are the current caretakers.
Don't have much in the way of parts to spare and am still learning more all the time about it.
Here's a few photos showing some of it's history and where it's at now.
Thanks to Chris Bamford for sharing his photo of our car.

01 - January - 2018 Studebaker Calendar (name blurred).jpg

02 - February - 2018 Studebaker Calendar.jpg

05 - May - IMGP0383 - Dad with Studebaker - June-2013.jpg

 

Brian Z_1926 Studebaker-107 (8.jpg

Edited by Brian Z (see edit history)
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On 1/26/2021 at 4:16 PM, Flivverking said:

Great car worthy of any work that needs to be done.

My advise is get a few big note binders and make up all major catagories with sub catagories like"chassis"broken down to axles and wheels,brakes etc..Motor / transmission..get it.

Start reviewing the car on what it needs in work,whats missing and make notations..in detail.

Begin searching out suppliers for various parts and sundries and write them down .and note what you may need from that company.

Make a seperated parts wanted list..

Have a section for specialized contacts as you find them for rebuilding things you may need to send out.

List speciality tools you made need as you go.

Be diligent about keeping notes on specifactions as you find them.

I think by now you get the picture.

 

Also start taking tons of photos before and during work and get prints made of important areas. 

 

When taking anything apart get use to labling and organizing everything as you go and make simple diagrams of how things go together if not super obvious to even an idiot.

 

Keep a good diary of all expenses. Right down to a cheap 60 cent paint brush ,50 cent sheet of sandpaper and the 2.bucks for stupid 1/4-20 machine screws.

 

Don't throw out anything but the old rotten tires for now.. A scrap of top material or running board cover you may need for matching.Lol.

 

Good luck

 

I agree with everything in this post. I would add that if you are familiar with Excel, make a spreadsheet with a number of pages for each section of the car and list parts needed and when. I also list the cost of each item and a budget for each section. I didn't start doing this until I was eight years into the project and I regret not doing this from the beginning. At the end of the project I made a punch list of the small stuff for completion of the project. 

 

Best of luck,

Mike 

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Try not to get too caught up in the model year. It's the model type and what the title indicates. Studebaker was not building year specific models during those years. They were making running changes throughout the year, and even making significant facelifts in the middle of some years. 

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29 minutes ago, JRA said:

Where is located that “577” tag in your car, Brian?
Does someone know the meaning of this tag?

My car has a similar tag, different number.

tks

 

I suspect that is the body number. The font of the letters looks like my tag.  Probably not much help except that it means they built at least that many of the same body style.

 

The later ones have the body type on the same tag.

 

 

 

 

1279368316 (2).jpg

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What a nice surprise to see another 26 Studebaker roadster under restoration! 

I rescued one several years ago which was one step away from the crusher and bought it for scrap metal price. 

No one wanted it, as its body was missing. My restoration is nearly completed so I have some experience, if you need help.

 

Unfortunately, I have few spare parts. 

I do need 2 front wheels, if anyone has these PLEASE let me know. 

 

I will try to stay with this thread, but feel free to call me. 

 

Scott Deno

cell 814 571-9790

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