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1949 Buick Sedanette FS in Sherman, TX


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This is the Sedanet or the jetback model that is very good looking but eventually fell out of favor with buyers back in the day, partly because of limited trunk space.  Also, the 2 door hardtops were just coming out in 1949 and were very attractive also.

They made the same model in 1950 but the production was way less than the 1949 models.   I believe there were no more made in the Roadmaster series after 1950.

My question is what year in this model is more sought after today, the 1949 or the 1950?   I am talking for restored stock models not modified cars.

Joe, BCA 33493

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I saw this car in person at the home of the late gentleman who "restored" it in Indiana in about 1999.  He was an old body man with a yen for chrome, and obviously did the car "his way".  Good quality work, but many things incorrect.  Price was $13,500.  I passed and eventually found my all original car.  I have seen at least three ads for it since then, in different hands each time.  Price in the Sherman ad is at least 3x any of the others.  Different wheels/tires on it seemingly each time too.

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22 hours ago, Joseph P. Indusi said:

This is the Sedanet or the jetback model that is very good looking but eventually fell out of favor with buyers back in the day, partly because of limited trunk space.  Also, the 2 door hardtops were just coming out in 1949 and were very attractive also.

They made the same model in 1950 but the production was way less than the 1949 models.   I believe there were no more made in the Roadmaster series after 1950.

My question is what year in this model is more sought after today, the 1949 or the 1950?   I am talking for restored stock models not modified cars.

Joe, BCA 33493

Joe - I would definitely say the '49 is the more sought after of the two.  It's got the purest design of any of the torpedo-style cars in my opinion. 

 

An interesting thing I found recently is the Hagerty Affordable Classics car index.  They use it to chart car prices using a basket of thirteen cars, one of which is the 1949 Buick 76S.  This put this car in a group of other recognized collector cars that are going to remain popular for awhile.  Nice to see my old beast is well thought of enough to be in the group.

 

https://www.hagerty.com/apps/valuationtools/market-trends/collector-indexes/Affordable_Classics

This Index Includes

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Yes this car was for sale out of Washington State when I inquired about it around March 2009 according to my file jpg's I have on my computer.  The guy was asking I think 20k at the time.  Same wheels but did not have the under dash A/C at the time.  SBRMD seriously there is not anything on the car that is "wrong" it is just not a 400 point back to original car.  It is what would of passed for a ticket ride custom back in the 50's. They had a lot of extra fine touches without having to cut or deck it.  Actually I was seriously thinking about buying it myself just before I found my all original low mileage 1-owner Roadie in L.A. sleeping after some 30+ years in a shed and went for that instead.  But yeah, it is neat that you actually met the guy who did this one ... not too many of them left today.  Most likely leaded as well properly.  Not to be a Debbie Downer yet I got a feeling though the whole car hobby is not going to come out the same on the other end of this Covid tunnel tube we are all in and neither will we.

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8 hours ago, buick man said:

Yes this car was for sale out of Washington State when I inquired about it around March 2009 according to my file jpg's I have on my computer.  The guy was asking I think 20k at the time.  Same wheels but did not have the under dash A/C at the time.  SBRMD seriously there is not anything on the car that is "wrong" it is just not a 400 point back to original car.  It is what would of passed for a ticket ride custom back in the 50's. They had a lot of extra fine touches without having to cut or deck it.  Actually I was seriously thinking about buying it myself just before I found my all original low mileage 1-owner Roadie in L.A. sleeping after some 30+ years in a shed and went for that instead.  But yeah, it is neat that you actually met the guy who did this one ... not too many of them left today.  Most likely leaded as well properly.  Not to be a Debbie Downer yet I got a feeling though the whole car hobby is not going to come out the same on the other end of this Covid tunnel tube we are all in and neither will we.

 

Hey David, I'm on the same page with you.  It's a really nice car, with quality work.  I didn't meet the guy who did the work, he had died and the car was being sold by his son.  Nothing "wrong" but quite a few things not quite "right", just done to that guy's taste.  I really did the same thing you did: thought seriously about it and at a lower price ($13,500! In like 1999.) but decided to pass and hold out for the right "original", which I fortunately found with 38K original miles, sleeping for decades in the garage of the second owner, a 100-year-old man who bought it in 1954!  I'm not sorry I ultimately did what I did, because I wanted to start with just the right car and do it the way I wanted to.  But I have to admit, as I see this one pop back up from time to time (and with ever higher prices) I kick myself a little.  It was ready to use, and I'm still working on mine 20+ years later.  My car is of course costing more than $13,500 to do.    But it's the way I want it.  That's the name of the game, right?

Edited by SBRMD (see edit history)
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Yeah SB, you have the whole nut in a shell with that analysis.  As Siddhartha learned, watching the river as it flowed was the journey in and of it's self.  That is why for many of us the real classic car experience is manifested thru the flow of our workings and all the minor detailed accomplishments of our endeavors .  That old man who did this Buick understood that.

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