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HOW THE VIRUS CHANGED THE COLLECTOR CAR WORLD: TOSSING OUT THE PERFECTIONISTS


nick8086
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 I don't think it tossed out the 'perfectionists' at all!   

 

It made them remain inside the house which has given them plenty of free time to do research on a particular marque, and if they are restoring one, more time to be meticulous and get it 100% correct.

 

Craig

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Perfectionists make sure things are done right. They do things how they are supposed to be done. They do research. They do not take the easy path. Yes it takes more time. Yes it is harder. Yes it costs more. Without perfectionists in this hobby you might as well start building hot rods. 

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Pay attention to the details not only in old cars but in everything you do and you will eliminate many problems. Perfection is a goal never reached but well worth striving too accomplish. 
dave s 

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“The pursuit of good enough” just doesn’t have the same ring to it as perfection.  It is the hang up of many engineers, Karl Benz as a good example, who view absolute perfection as the only goal.  Striving to do the best you can or as close to perfection as possible is an admirable quality to have.  

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Am considered a perfectionist by some since research deep obscure things. OTOH do not have a show car, all of mine are drivers. Would rather have a good working system than a correct Bose or a correct DA6 AC that doesn't. OTOH it is always phun to point out when something everyone knows is stock, isn't (like a R-59 battery).

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On the field at Pebble Beach, perfection is just the ticket that gets you into the running. It’s common to have six or more 100 point fresh restorations in a class. That’s why we see the cars on tour.........trying to get a step up above the 100 point mark. They even check the clock to see it’s making correct time. One of my favorite things to do with competitors in our class is to complement them on a great car and the “head to head” competition they are involved in. I once said to a close friend and a same in class competitor..........any eight of the cars in the class would be an automatic best of show contender at any Concours anywhere in the world.....but on the 18th green at Pebble...........all but one we’re going away as losers. He smiled at me and agreed. The subtleties of winning at Pebble go beyond the achievement of 100 point perfection.........color choice, contrasting the interior to the exterior, white walls or black walls, top up or down, and another 50 items. It’s all a ridiculous amount of work, but fantastic fun.......and sometimes disappointment. No one goes to Pebble “just for the fun”...............that said, I can’t wait for this years competition. I have a new strategy to employ on the field.........🤔

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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A perfectionist will do well with things mechanical in nature, cars, machines, a traditionalist remembers the way things were done in the past and finds the beauty in those ways and a craftsman can blend perfectionism and traditionalism into a thing of beauty.   These things can all be applied to restoring our beloved veteran automobiles.  If only all of life was so simple...

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?   I see robust prices for cars that the perfectionists restore.   

 

On example, Carroll Shelby's 427 cobra.  Before restoration sold for less that $2million. After restoration back to original type motor, color, etc.  $5.5 million.   

 

Most of the top money have only gotten richer over the past year and some are doing better than ever.   I believe that will drive up prices on the top stuff. 

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I think Ed just told us he is taking the "GREAT WHITE" to the 18th green at Pebble Beach and is going to eat the competition- makes it the only one left to WIN!!!  Good plan. 

dave s 

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5 hours ago, Brass is Best said:

Perfectionists make sure things are done right. They do things how they are supposed to be done. They do research. They do not take the easy path. Yes it takes more time. Yes it is harder. Yes it costs more. Without perfectionists in this hobby you might as well start building hot rods. 

Hot rodders may not be purists but according to your above definition, many are perfectionists.

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7 hours ago, padgett said:

Sounds like being a perfectionist (is software ever finished ?) make one more liable to infection.

Infection perfection?  Perfection infection?

 

Perfection is a dimension of OCD, so maybe it really is an infection.

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37 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

If you do not have the time to do it right the first time, where are you going to find the time to fix it a second time?

Oh- Larry- we never said such a thing at Ford, we said "There's never enough time to do it right but there's always time to do it over again"

 

You must've worked for GM...

 

Dave...

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7 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

So you can wax & polish to a new shine.

 LOL You knew me from long ago!. I washed a 65 Riviera so often the Vinyl Top started caving from all the rust that grew from the dampness I hosed behind it.

Now I wash my little collection once a year whether they need it or not.
 

Edited by gungeey
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"It is better to aim at perfection and miss it than to aim at imperfection and hit it". Thomas J. Watson, Sr. President of IBM

 

How do we define perfection in auto restoration? For example, is it giving a 1965 Mustang a perfect paint job that would look great on a new Rolls Royce or one that has orange peel and drips at the bottom of the doors the way it came from the factory? I submit that the orange peel paint job is the one that achieved perfection. I think it is worth considering.

 

There are certain endeavors that demand perfectionism. I want the pilot of the airplane I am on to be a perfectionist, along with the air traffic controller and the ground crew. I want a perfectionist rebuilding my car's engine when needed. I think it is important to know when to demand perfection. Of course, as Winston Churchill was supposed to have said, "my tastes are simple, I am easily satisfied by the best."

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird (not quite perfectly restored but enjoyable as is)

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2 hours ago, 1957Birdman said:

"It is better to aim at perfection and miss it than to aim at imperfection and hit it". Thomas J. Watson, Sr. President of IBM

 

 

Interesting that you chose to quote him, he had quit the car collection back in the 1980's. Bob 

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9 hours ago, 1957Birdman said:

How do we define perfection in auto restoration? For example, is it giving a 1965 Mustang a perfect paint job that would look great on a new Rolls Royce or one that has orange peel and drips at the bottom of the doors the way it came from the factory? I submit that the orange peel paint job is the one that achieved perfection. I think it is worth considering.

I believe Bill Harrah used that mindset for his restorations; restoring it just like it left the factory, complete with paint runs, et al.    

 

Otherwise its considered 'over-restored' to some perfectionists.

 

Craig

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1 hour ago, Restorer32 said:

The pursuit of perfection is what we are paid for.

Including how far the restoration shop can leave all the original chalk marks from the factory on the firewall intact!!  

 

I do know Piper's at Westmoreland Antique Car Restorations in Blairsville have taken great pains on a couple of projects to preserve the factory firewall markings with excellent results.

 

Craig

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58 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

I believe Bill Harrah used that mindset for his restorations; restoring it just like it left the factory, complete with paint runs, et al. 

 

Having spent some time in my career as a service rep and service engineer calling on dealers, I have seen quite a few cars right from the factory coming off the truck with paint runs.  Not unusual, but fortunately not very often.

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As we know there is no such thing as perefect in the human world,but striving for it isn't such a bad thing.

 

 When it becomes an obsession and one's only goal in all things it's a serious problem.

Top it off with expecting others to comply or attain your self perscribed ideals of how things should be is a big downer.

 

It regards to perfect restorations?

 

Years back I had a chance to help out tweaking/ a concors(perfect restoration )well known Cadillac town car..about 1930 vintage. The car was gorgeous.

 I had to crawl under the dash to tuck up a sagged wire that became  visable..

The back of the dash panel and under side of the cowl and vents where dry and raw surface rusty metal with overspray spots and all the gauge backs were as crummy as any old car.(but they worked and the faces great LOL) .

 

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, CHuDWah said:

Hot rodders may not be purists but according to your above definition, many are perfectionists.

The point of this hobby is to put things back as they were. I like hot rods. I have owned several. But when you are building a hot rod and have a problem making a part work you just get another part. Or you modify what you have. There are no rules. It is the wild west. 

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4 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

The pursuit of perfection is what we are paid for.

 

It always bothered me working at a shop that had different degrees of "Restored". I did what I was told, it wasn't my name over the door or mentioned on the show field. 

 

Bob

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We are sometimes asked to do restoration work that might be "less than perfect" to keep the cost down. I respond to these requests by asking "What part of the restoration will you be happy with being less than perfect? Are runs in the paint ok? Orange peel? Can the upholstery be baggy? Is it ok if the engine smokes? Scratches in the chrome?"  I'm

 not saying all our work is perfect. No one's is but we try to do the best we can.   When folks say they just want a nice driver what they really mean is they want perfect but do not want to pay for it. "I just want a nice driver. It will never be shown" is one of the biggest lies I have ever been told.

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