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Possible Project - 1953 Ford Country Squire - what should I look for?


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That's a 53, not a 55.

 

Anything available for 53 passenger car should apply to the Squire except for wagon-specific stuff. The woodgrain outline mouldings may be dicey if they're missing.

 

Driveline present? Flathead is easy as it gets. Keep in mind 53 won't have many creature comforts we take for granted. Fordomatic reasonably common, power steering and brakes not so much though a Squire would be likely to have them.

 

*edit* Looks like a lot of missing or unusable glass that might be hard to source.

 

Is this a Southwest car? As in dry and reasonably clean sheetmetal? 

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Front end is definitely '53.

And remember, the '53s were still 6v cars.

If it's missing dash pieces the clock for '53 can be hard to find and the V in all the emblems was gold plated for Ford's 50th anniversary.

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Two of the door handles and the steering wheel look ok. Not so sure about the rest, rust of frame would be biggest worry. Plus a ton of work on the rest. Are they giving it to you or at least very low cost. It’s going to take a good amount of cash for parts. 
dave s 

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The advice to "look for the best car you can find for the money" should be primary when considering any old car.  Unless the specific cars is ultra-rare, low-production or a one-off, there are always good survivors of any make, year and model of production cars available.   If the 1953 Ford Country Squire has special meaning for you, pursue one it much better, more complete condition that this car, which looks, at most, to be a parts car. 

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Does it have an engine? See if it is free, or locked up. 3 Speed, or Ford O Matic ? Plenty of Flathead parts available. As far as trim for the Country Squire, I don't know. Interesting project you are looking at. 

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Finding parts can be a nightmare. The restoration on this car may cost more than the car is worth. In the first picture, why does the front wheel look like it's too far back in the wheel well?

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The car looks like an early '53. In mid year they went from real wood trim applied over Di-Noc simulated wood as the car pictured has. In late '53, wood grained fiberglass trim was used in place of wood. The wood can be fabricated, but finding fiberglass trim is impossible. The glass is mostly flat, so that's not an issue. The lift gate glass will be hard to find if it's un-usable. As others have stated, it's a beautiful car when restored, especially the early, "real wood" cars.

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47 minutes ago, TexasJohn55 said:

    As in "Swiss" ?🙂   or cottage or cheddar or blue ......

 

Yes. :)  The floors are not Gouda.

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to Possible Project - 1953 Ford Country Squire - what should I look for?

I agree with the "pass" decision on this one. And I'll admit that I really enjoy following your threads about your search for a project. Thanks for sharing, Peter. 

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16 hours ago, Peter Gariepy said:

FYI:

Looked worse in the light.

Floors and frame are cheese.
Hard pass...

 

But it was fun to consider. :)

 

 

Peter, you made the right decision.

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I enjoyed Mr. Walling's reference to the metal "Unobtanium". True, so true.

On 1/19/2021 at 3:58 PM, Roger Walling said:

 The frame on 55's were often rotted. Tap the bottom of the frame under the doors and the front crossmember.

 The "wood trim is VERY hard to find.

 

 ( A 55 front cross member is made of unobtanium.)

 

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not that it matters but it was not a 55 as several mentioned.the front cross member was a problem(rust) from 54-56 but there are replacements available.agree on the choice of letting it rust in peace

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1969:

My first car was the 1954 version, rust 1/3 the way up, rotted wood with matching carpet, good old "BONDO" water jacket sealer on both sides of the block. I got a good deal on it $5 and came with a full tank of gas.

Counting for inflation offer $95 and a credit for 20 gallons of gas.

 

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What should I look for?

 

Sorry the car didn't work out. FYI, however, rear decking is hard to find for Ford wagons of this era. Possibly impossible to find, but let me know if that isn't the case. I know that you can find repops of it for tri-five Chevy wagons.

 

Therefore, I had to refurbish the decking on my '54 Ranch Wagon. It was heavily cracked, with cracked edges distorting significantly, so I had to take the decking off and sand it down and fill in the cracks. Coated it with a "Gravel Gard" product from Britain, and put on an earth tone top coat. Doesn't look factory, but looks pretty presentable, and has held up well for about 14 years (though it gets little use.)

 

The one thing I see that tends look pretty shabby on most "spruced up " Ford wagon interiors of this era is the inner surface of the rear wheel well,  which was exposed on these cars and coated at the factory with a hard sound deadener/insulation/whtever that almost always cracks horribly. I scraped all of mine off (hard work) and refinished per the decking. Most people try to save this coating and it generally looks awful.

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