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1928 Chevrolet Sport Cabriolet Perhaps?


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In some old photos of my late parents, I found this gem my father undoubtedly took of my mother.  In his papers, he had some notes of cars he owned (although unfortunately not on the photo itself).  It looks like he got a different car every year back in the late 20's or early 30's.  The list for this time period included: 1927 Ford Speedster, 1928 Chevrolet Convertible, 1929 Oakland Roadster, 1929 Studebaker, 1930 Ford Convertible, and 1932 Ford Roadster.

 

I think this is the 1928 Chevrolet Convertible, but I'm looking for some more expert identification of what I can do by comparing pictures from the internet.  Is the model a 1928 Chevrolet Sport Cabriolet? 

 

Herb

Southeastern Michigan

 

 

LAU-1566.jpg

Edited by Herb-Michigan (see edit history)
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Sure looks like a '28 Chevrolet car to me. However, it is quite unusual, seriously accessorized. The bumpers are not standard Chevrolet, and somewhat upscale. Looks like some additional small lights above the front bumper, a leaping dog of some sort radiator cap (there were many of those to choose from), and what appears to be a running board post mounted spotlight. Those were usually also on much more expensive automobiles.

And yes, it appears to be a cabriolet (convertible), sometimes and by some companies called a convertible coupe.

Interesting car!

I wonder if he accessorized his other cars that much?

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Wayne, many thanks for the confirmation and additional details you observed about the accessories.  When searching images to identify this car, the bumpers really threw me since I have not found any similar bumpers on either Chevy or Fords from that era.  My father had a job making deliveries which might explain the spotlight.  In response to your question, I do believe he liked to be a bit flamboyant, so accessorizing this car or other cars is not a surprise.

 

Here's a photo of my dad taken with his car.  I particularly like the attitude expressed by his suit, tie, mussed hair, and the way he positioned himself over the open door.  His family was not well off so he had to work hard to get the $695 (advertised price) to buy the car.

 

Herb

MAX-1614(2).jpg

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Thanks to you as well, Frank.  The wheels seemed a bit odd to me, not because of the 6 bolts, but so many of the speedsters and roadsters in that time period I researched seemed to have wire (or even wooden) spoke wheels.

Herb

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Your father's car is a 1928 Chevrolet Sport Cabriolet (convertible). The one in the Google photo is a coupe. The cabriolet had a folding top and a rumble seat. The coupe looked very similar but the top didn't fold and a trunk, no rumble seat. A close look at the coupe shows that the doors had a solid frame around the windows. The closeup of your dad shows the lack of the solid window frame in his car.

 

Chevrolet had always had a roadster with a folding top and side curtains and a totally different body than the coupe. By 1927 most makers were offering a "cabriolet" which had a folding top and roll-up windows instead of side curtains. To meet it's competition Chevrolet introduced the Sport Cabriolet in late 1927. It was based on the coupe body but was sportier than the coupe with a rumble seat and a fabric top two or three inches lower than the coupe. Interestingly the Chevrolet version was not a true "cabriolet" but only looked like one. The top in 1927 had exposed top bows like a convertible but retained the fixed full-frame windows and fixed top. The first true cabriolet from Chevrolet with folding top and windows was the 1928 model like your Dad's. 

 

The great majority of the Chevies in 1927 and 1928 had the 6-bolt disk wheels. Wood spoke wheels were available; I don't believe I've seen wire wheels.  Bumpers were not standard and many had aftermarket bumpers.

 

Compare Model:

 

1927 Chevrolet Coupe. The taller top and shorter hood look much more upright than the 1928 coupe in oldford's post.  

 

352493538_Chevrolet1927Coupe1.thumb.jpg.73ed0a40ae3948700bf7455b41c7005d.jpg

 

1927 Chevrolet Sport Cabriolet. The top is 2-3 inches lower than the coupe and it has a rumble seat. The fabric top shows the supporting top bows and has a small small back window to look like a convertible but does not actually fold. Note the rigid frame around the windows. The lower top carried over to 1928.

 

 

1826972511_Chevrolet1927SportCabriolet1.thumb.JPG.877522ea99d4a9f6a9545280642bd6d8.JPG

 

 

1928 Chevrolet Roadster. The Roadster was an entirely different body from the coupe and cabriolet. I believe the closed bodies were built by Fisher, the roadster and touring were done in-house by GM. Could be wrong on that.

 

891031775_Chevrolet1928Roadster.thumb.jpg.93b045a7e0a20e1ec920693594c871aa.jpg

 

Don

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19 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

Anyone else notice that the door handle on the car in question is located BELOW the beltline like it is on the roadster?

 

Good eye, Kiser. You just sent me on an internet search. As expected on the internet many coupes and cabriolets are misidentified, but it seems the coupes and 1927 cabriolets have door handles between the two moldings and the 28 cabriolets are below the moldings. Maybe the door handles interfere with the folding window mechanism. I don't think I've seen an actual 1928 Sport Cabriolet. Maybe someone else here knows.

 

Looking closely at the original photo the paint and pinstripe on the front and door don't match the rear body; likely it was damaged at some point. Also there appears to be a taillight and license tag on the left rear fender. Originally these would have been in the center of the spare tire. Another owner modification or is it maybe not a Chevy at all? Fisher made very similar bodies for other makes.

 

Don

Edited by DLynskey
Added info (see edit history)
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I suspect the car in original photo, if it is a Chevrolet, is a 1927, based on apparent hood length. As some may know, Chevrolet planned for their 1928 models to use the new stovebolt 6 cyl engine, and lengthened the hood accordingly by about 3" or 4" to accommodate the longer engine block (see oldfords '28 Coupe photo above). When manufacturing timetables for the engine became problematic, they opted to install the 4cyl engines instead and installed a shroud between rad and engine to accommodate proper cooling. The first 6's began in 1929. So the OP car may have originally been a 1927 model cabriolet (based on hood length)(convertible but not roadster) with some 1928 bits, and the gentleman may in fact have a used car with some modifications, such as a driver's door replacement. The car also appears to have a "greyhound" or similar hood ornament, while Chevrolet by that time had started using the "Viking". I think we have some work to do to nail down this "mashup", including the interesting door handle issue.

Edited by Gunsmoke (see edit history)
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Here are original photos of what I think might be a 1928 Chevy.  They were in a family collection.  It’s educational to see what cars looked like (and the people) back in the day.

 

565806C3-F763-4240-91E4-98DCA5054311.jpeg

2EC7C9BA-9D1E-4242-B575-C802DEB59724.jpeg

4B15051A-E7B7-414A-9266-4B989ACD9398.jpeg

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You folks really know some incredible details about automobiles.  Very impressive.  The modifications and accessories noted in the replies, led me to find another image showing the rear of the car.  And, yes, that's my mother on the passenger side of the car.  As noted in the replies, rather than the license and tail light being in the center of the spare tire, this image clearly shows these items mounted on the left rear fender with the spare tire covered in what looks like a metal case.  The non-standard rear bumper in two separate sections also is more clearly shown.  The negative for this photo was severely light-fogged, but I've done my best to bring out the details.  Also, note the Michigan license plate indicating 1928.

 

Herb

LAU-1627.jpg

Edited by Herb-Michigan
Corrected typos. Added license plate comment. (see edit history)
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Rear view of a stock 1928 coupe showing the tai light and license on the spare tire rack. The car across the street in the last photo is a 1925 or 1926 Chevrolet 4-door sedan.

 

1254705097_Chevrolet1928Coupe.thumb.jpg.509d7ccc8ec27b38522c4718e5da5daf.jpg

 

Don

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