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Man A Fre patented induction system


seyman
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I am recalling ads in performance magazines in mid 1960's for Man A Fre (as I recall the name). They billed themselves as the DQE (dual quad eliminator). I never saw one of these installed. Anyone else familiar with this (or at least the ads)? This is the only discussion forum I visit. Hope the subject is not too inappropriate for this group. Thanks in advance.

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That Graffiti coupe would look good anywhere <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> (especially in my driveway- wishful thinking <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif" alt="" />). Would you not agree that this car has a pedigree? And it was built WAY prior to the 25 year cutoff date. The argument was always about newly constructed cars without papers getting in...

I remember Man-A-Fre for Toyota Land Cruiser stuff more than anything else. There were a bunch of those boxy things around here in the 70s, and seems like they all had Man-A-Fre induction.

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It was a two two-barrel intake if I remember right Wayne. Set up for the Toyota inline six that the Land Cruiser used. A guy I worked with years ago had one, don't know if he still has it. I remember he turned the thing upside down in a creek once.

Back in 1987, I was car-pooling with him. We got back-to-back snows of 12 and 14 inches respectively that February, and if we hadn't had that Land Cruiser we'd have never got to work.

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My take on Hartmann's Britney Spears obsession was kinda like Wile E. Coyote chasing the Roadrunner- in the unlikely event he caught it, what would he do with it?! <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

Defend yourself, Hartmann- we know you're out there lurking in the shadows somewhere!

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  • 8 years later...

I have one on my 34 coupe 63 era hot rod I am buildling. Glass body a lot of stuff like the AG coupe.

Finishedcarbsintake.jpg

I am recalling ads in performance magazines in mid 1960's for Man A Fre (as I recall the name). They billed themselves as the DQE (dual quad eliminator). I never saw one of these installed. Anyone else familiar with this (or at least the ads)? This is the only discussion forum I visit. Hope the subject is not too inappropriate for this group. Thanks in advance.
Edited by jdj9410 (see edit history)
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  • 6 months later...

I first saw the Man-A-Fre induction system, back in 1962. A man by the name of Harold Graves was selling the systems in Canoga Park, CA. I owned a 57 Corvette at the time, and I was very impressed by his system, and I bought one and installed it on my Corvette. It used 4 2-barrel Rochester carburators, mounted on a fairly flat manifold. Each carb was positioned so it fed two cylinders. This was not a progressive linkage, all carbs worked together at the same time. The system was very responsive, but you had to set up the proper ignition curve for it, otherwise it would just bog down, if you fed in too much throttle at once.

I traded in my 57 Corvette in late 63, when I took delivery of a new 64 fuel injected Corvette. I removed the Man-A-Fre before selling the car, and about a year later, I loaned it to a good friend of mine, who put it on his 65 Corvette. Two years later, we both traded in our Corvettes for 67 427/435HP Corvettes. The Man-A-Fre system was removed from his car before trading it in.

I decided to try the Man-A-Fre on my 67 big block, and contacted Harold Graves again, and I traded in my old small block system, for a new big block system. The manifold was designed for the bigger engine, plus it used larger Rochesters. I think the Man-A-Fre was the equal to the stock Tri-Power set up, I removed, plus the appearence of the engine was a delight for the eyes.

Two years later, the 67 got traded in for a 69 small block Corvette, and once again I removed the Man-A-Fre system before selling the 67. Since the manifold was designed for a big block, I never installed it on the 69, or any other car I have owned sense. It has set in my garage for 42 years, and I guess it has now become something of a collector's item.

The Man-A-Fre name was used later for Toyota off road applications, but I think after the stricter smog laws came into effect...the Man-A-Fre system was not consider legal for use on V-8 powered cars, not being CARB certified, and it just disappeared.

Hope this sheds some light on this subject

Jeff

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I remember when the Man-A-Fre systems were advertised in many magagines. The 4x2bbl Rochester carb was their spec system. As each carb throttle bore had one cylinder to feed, it could well have been inspired by the Weber carb systems on European racing engines of that time. But not a "real" fuel injection as the port-injected Rochester system on the Corvettes.

More memories!

NTX5467

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