Jump to content

Recommended Posts

On 1/16/2021 at 8:41 AM, padgett said:

...

Always preferred small rent cars, had a lot of Pintos with nary a bit of trouble.

 

Ugh.  The only Pinto I've ever driven was a rental in 1979.  In of all places, Las Vegas.  Did a innocent low speed U-turn at a light on Las Vegas Blvd.  Rear wheels broke loose and the car immediately went into oversteer.  Terrible.  Never went near another one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

   I would agree, there are some bargain classics out there from that period. Fox body 5.0L Mustangs seem popular. I make light of this Maseratty but I make fun of all cars, they are all terrible, I try not to take it all too seriously...not become obsessed and all that nonsense, then it ceases to be enjoyable. I paid no where near what they are asking for those CL cars and as result I am able to drive this car and not worry, use it for transportation which is my definition of what a vehicle is intended to be. Stylish looks are always a bonus of course. From my research this should be a relatively low maintenance car with the Mitsubishi mini-van engine, K car mechanicals, parts from Autozone, nothing too exotic...that is why I got it, I've always done my own repair and maintenance and I repair this car. If I can't fix it I don't buy it.

   Pinto a.k.a Mustang II, Vega, Cosworth Vega, Chevy Citation, K car, early '60s Pontiac Tempest, Chevy Corvair, Henry J, Nash Metropolitan (English Austin with refrigerator DNA)...all early attempts by American car makers to enter the economy car market...all terrible cars but all cars are terrible, they all break down eventually and then you have to lay under it for two days busting your knuckles and getting all greasy fixing it. Terrible! LOL

 

  

  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael I laud your choice, and understand your excitement. A well kept car that might be shown, or driven vs a daily driver-I understand the difference and appreciate both. I was rather surprised to find, what seem to be, two fine cars that exemplify what I was saying and thought I would share.

Link to post
Share on other sites

   Absolutely, I understand that some invest vast sums of money restoring collectable cars, some are in possession of rare, pristine, low mileage survivor cars, pieces of motoring history. Those cars should be preserved for posterity. Jay Leno does that, Harold LeMay's family does that as well as countless other automobile enthusiasts. This car ain't that caliber of car so I'm going to have fun driving it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...