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SHOULD I PAINT MY SS396 CHEVELLE THE ORIGINAL BUILD COLOR WITH NUMBERS MATCHING W/ 20K ORIGINAL MILES


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I AM HAVING A REAL HARD TIME WITH THE COLOR I SHOULD PAINT A CAR THAT IM RESTORING. ITS A BARN FIND 67 CHEVELLE SS 396 CONVERTIBLE WITH NO RUST ALL ORIGINAL MATCHING NUMBERS WITH ONLY 20K MILES. ITS BUILD SHEET IS THE BUTTERNUT YELLOW. IM  NOT A FAN OF THE COLOR BUTTERNUT. IM WONDERING IF IT WILL HURT THE VALUE ON A EVERY NUT AND BOLT ROTISSERIE RESTORE ?

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My thought is if you're going to do a complete nut/bolt restore that's so involved I would go with the proper colors. Some colors may not be the greatest, but when a car is finished and all the chrome is on it helps break it up.  You may be surprised how it looks after it's finished.  Besides, I bet there aren't very many butternut colored 396 SS converts out there either.  Just my opinion.  

Edited by Laughing Coyote (see edit history)
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I would tend to think that a colour change would affect the value, BUT after a quick look through Hemmings, the chevelles with the highest asking prices are resto modded, SO, there goes the originality aspect. 'Resale red' is always good, and few can resist a triple black car done correctly, both would most likely add value. If you plan on keeping the car, paint it something you will like and can live with. I knew a guy with a 68 conv chevelle that was probably your cars colour, it was kind of a pale yellow. I think it looked pretty good.

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Ruler2019, it's your car, so please yourself. But keep in mind that MANY muscle cars have been repainted red or black, or whatever...leaving other colors harder to find. Butternut yellow can be really attractive on a Chevelle, if you set it off with nice looking tires, wheels, and all new bright n shiny trim, etc. 

 

IF you paint it a different color, be prepared for those guys who will look at your trim tag, and then smile to each other as they say, "OH! It's the INCORRECT color," or, "Too bad. It's a REPAINT."  That's no big deal, if you don't care, and if you plan to keep the car. But I can tell you that I have intended to keep various collector cars forever, only to later find one that I really, really wanted something different which suddenly became available. Then it became necessary to sell the one I already had. In that case, the original paint color may really enhance its value...especially on a low-mileage original car, and especially if it has all of its "born-with" original SS 396 drivetrain, etc. 

 

As far as VALUE goes, it's true that some colors really do have a negative effect on resale. But in my experience, Butternut Yellow is not one of them. 

 

Good luck, whatever you decide. 

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No disrespect, but I think that low mileage has little to factor in to this car, at least IMHO. Regardless it has/is going through a complete nut and bolt resto, which is a good thing. I think its silly when someone states 'all original, only one repaint' etc.

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I don't think a color change will hurt the car that much unless you are going to judged events. I say paint the car any color you like. You will be much happier in the end. Just my personal opinion. Also, even tho no chevelles were painted Elkheart green, I'm kinda partial to the color. :LOL

 

2001199925_1973Corvette004-Copy.thumb.jpg.47462dd4112b111aee42f1ffcd675a47.jpg

Edited by Morgansdad
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1 hour ago, ruler2019 said:

Sorry Jim !

 

It doesn't really matter whether your letters

are capital or typical, in my opinion.  Normal

writing is clearer, but you don't owe anyone

an apology.  Welcome to the forum!

 

I say, paint the car whatever correct color you

want.  There's no need to own a car, and spend

all the money and effort on restoration, if you

don't like it.  For rare cars and rare colors, it's

nice to preserve history and keep a car as the

original owner ordered it, but I don't think you'll

do any harm by having a factory color you really 

like.

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28 minutes ago, Graham Man said:

1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS for Sale | ClassicCars.com | CC-1026920

If that is Butternut yellow, that looks nice. If it was a brighter yellow maybe not. A lot of the factory solid colors change in the light also.  Mine is a Beige color and when it's in different light it can look more yellowish or more tan.

Edited by Laughing Coyote (see edit history)
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Thanks John, I didn't think it would matter caps or not but wanna keep everyone HAPPY ! LOL

Padgett, everything is a perfect match except the muncie 4 speed it came with the auto trans. But it is a original AC car with power windows power top Buckets and all the goodies available in that year. I was planning on taking it to a few car shows to have it judged so I imagine that might matter.  

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There is an old saying among body shop painters. "It takes the same amount of work and money, to paint a car the right color as it does to paint it the wrong color". Down the road you will be telling everyone that has any interest in your car, "it's as it came from the factory, numbers matching, etc,  except......". Yes, it's your car and you can paint it any color you want, but once you decide to show it or sell it, if the build sheet calls for Butternut, you will take a big hit.

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When I owned my first Mustang many years ago in high school it was a very unappealing, factory light beige . At the time I thought it was a awful color for a Mustang, I don't think it was very common as I have only seen a handful of others over the decades.  Perhaps it's just nostalgia , but over time I have actually come to think that I would almost prefer that color if I ever own another 1st. gen. Mustang. One of those things that seems to get better with time.

 

Greg

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If I’m going to spend years and huge sums of money restoring something, I want the end result to please me.....not some book worm who doesn’t own a car but is a judge at meets or shows. When I order a steak, I order it the way I want it......not the way my dinner companion likes it.

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Growing up my friends dad had a root beer brown 66 mustang GT, with brown/tan pony interior, basically all the options, with a light tan vinyl top. There were not many GTs around so never really thought about what a unique color combination it was. Later his dad restored it and went with the typical red/white. It became ‘common’ when he did that IMO

Edited by 72caddy (see edit history)
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When I was in high school I had a beater 1972 Mustang....Medium Lime Metallic, I called it a color only a Mother could love... I have looked for about two years for the same color car, might just paint mine.  Color is a personal choice, I say paint it any way that makes you happy.  Generally over the years I have always liked the factory colors from the year car, they seem to pass the test of time the best.

 

image.png.e5b184c519873aab5eb121ae6a316c6f.png

 

1972 Mustang 4F Medium Lime Metallic, only available in 1972 and 1970

 

 

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I think if you stick with a factoey color you should be fine, although I personally think butternut suits these cars pretty good, more so on the 68, 69 models.  Recently saw one with a black vinyl top and cragers and it was such a breath of fresh air over red or black.

 

Morgan's dad, I knew a guy who bought a c3 in your green, painted it black and I always thought he went from unique and interesting to yawn.

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My daily driver was Waverly Maroon from the factory.  I hate Maroon.  In the 1960 (when it was 30 years old)I two toned it as could have been done in the factory, an original blue and Black.  By 2000 (when it was 70 years old and I was 58) it needed a repaint.  My wife said you could/should go back to Maroon.  I did and am glad I did (Happy Wife Happy Life😁).  Neither paint job was expensive as I did it myself.  I think I like Maroon at least a little bit now.  Moral of the story paint it whatever color you like, preferably from from the cars original palette.  Your car, your choice.  I would like to see a picture of your car when finished.

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I agree.

In and absolute ocean of red, blue and black Chevelles, they all begin to look the same.  Some of the rarer colors are very refreshing to see and this Butternut Yellow with contrasting Black accent, top and interior is certainly one of them.

butternut.thumb.jpg.728ddbc938e2d5d4a5005136b173799e.jpg

 

This is a fairly rare car and should bring top money once finished.  And if you're expecting top money make no mistake, the numbers and tags will matter, especially to the muscle car crowd.

My credo for top money cars has always been,  if the listing includes the words "except for" anywhere in the dialogue, it's not a top money car.

Be this guy:

redblue.jpg.61422554518164b9278ccf3ab2e36250.jpg

 

 

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
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If you plan to keep the car, i would suggest painting it a color that you like.  For a restored car, I think that selecting a factory-correct color would be a smart move.  I had the same dilemma on my 1956 Cadillac.  I found an original color chart on eBay, my wife and I picked a color that we love, and its period-correct to boot.

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I actually like Butternut Yellow.  I owned a '66 Oldsmobile Delta 88 in that color (called 'Lemonwood Yellow' for 1966) years ago.  Your Chevelle will look great in that color, and it suits the car (and the era) well.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)
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Do you want a car that stands out from the herd, or something that looks like every other 67 at a show?

 

60s cars ALWAYS look better in a good color than they do in something commonplace like red or black. I've never seen many cars I thought truly looked good in red, and black is too hard to keep up.

 

FWIW even though they are the same paint code, 66 was Lemonwood Yellow. Butternut came in 67-69 and in 1965 it was called Crocus Yellow and restricted to SS models in all series, Impala/Caprice and Monza/Corsa.

 

I often get tickled at my Chevelle bud. He and his brothers have 66 Chevelles in Lemonwood, Aztec Bronze and Artesian Turquoise. The cars are restored correctly and make an impressive display at a show or cruise night. Yet they always lose, points or popular, to a red or black car. After one such event he said, loud enough for everyone to hear, "You know GM made these damn cars in other colors than red and black!"

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If you have the build sheet, it's a number matching car and you plan on doing a full boat resto, there are far worse colors than butternut yellow.

I would paint it back the original color with black top and interior.

 

They look great in that color combo.

 

But it's your car in the end.

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59 minutes ago, Akstraw said:

If you plan to keep the car, i would suggest painting it a color that you like.  For a restored car, I think that selecting a factory-correct color would be a smart move.  I had the same dilemma on my 1956 Cadillac.  I found an original color chart on eBay, my wife and I picked a color that we love, and its period-correct to boot.

I agree.  If the car is something you are restoring to show at the highest levels then flip it when it is at its peak value then you must stay with the original build sheet.

On the other hand,  if you are building it for you but may want to sell someday when, or if, the next automotive love of your life comes along,  paint it how you like it. If someone asks why its not factory correct,  you tell the truth; you didn't want yellow. 

In the for whatever it is worth department,  yellow is my favorite color on a car. 

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If you are going to spend all of that money on a restoration (an almost always money-losing proposition) I would buy one that came in the factory red color and sell this one to someone who appreciates it in a color other than red.  I usually pass by red Camaros, Chevelles, GTOs and Mustangs because they are so common.  I will take particular notice of a car in an unusual color.  We have the same discussions on the Cadillac LaSalle forum.  The consensus is to restore it in the original color if you hope to recoup most of your investment at a later date.  If that's not important to you, then paint it the way you want it and know that you or your heirs will probably get less for it when you sell it.  I recently came across a '71 442 W-30 convertible clone in lime with matching green interior.  It was originally a Cutlass Supreme convertible with Bittersweet paint and interior (a great combination since I was familiar with a '71 442 convertible with the factory air induction hood in that color combination at U of M-Dearborn).  To each his own. 

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7 hours ago, ruler2019 said:

I AM HAVING A REAL HARD TIME WITH THE COLOR I SHOULD PAINT A CAR THAT IM RESTORING....

...NOT A FAN OF THE COLOR... 

...IF IT WILL HURT THE VALUE ON A EVERY NUT AND BOLT ROTISSERIE RESTORE ?

Are you restoring the car for yourself to keep...

... OR....

.... for its next owner ?

 

Once you figure out which, your other concerns should become self-evident.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, ruler2019 said:

Thanks John, I didn't think it would matter caps or not but wanna keep everyone HAPPY ! LOL

Padgett, everything is a perfect match except the muncie 4 speed it came with the auto trans. But it is a original AC car with power windows power top Buckets and all the goodies available in that year. I was planning on taking it to a few car shows to have it judged so I imagine that might matter.  

 

How can it be a "numbers matching car" if the type of transmission has been changed from that with which it left the factory?  With the 4 speed modification, it is in danger of being classified as a "resto mod".

 

As far as I'm concerned, unless you purchased the car just to flip it, restore it the way you want it.  The transmission change will definitely affect the value with the "numbers matching" crowd. 

 

Cheers,

Grog

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