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Tire and rim blew off brake drum shearing all lug bolts off at the drum


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Does anyone have experience in determining the cause of such a thing on a single axle trailer, not overloaded?

No perceptable warning given, just boom and tire, rim, and lug bolts and nuts gone.

Whew

 

20201004_195959.jpg

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Two possibilities that are seemingly opposite each other.

 

The lugs could have been too loose, or too tight. Either one will do it. Supposed to tighten them periodically with a torque wrench to the proper foot-pounds.

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From personal experience:

 

The last time a tire was serviced 

on that wheel - the lug nuts were either over torqued with an impact wrench which stretched the treads and cause the shearing or the lug nuts were not tightened up all the way and properly torqued or not all of the lug nuts were installed on the wheel ( maybe every other one ) and the ones that were installed lossened up.

 

You probably know who worked on that wheel last 🤔

 

Example of why you should never

tow a single axle trailer.

 

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)
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Gave a visual check of both sides of the trailer at every stop, on the way up and on the way back.  No signs of a leaning wheel or loose lug bolts at least visual to the eye. 

 

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From the picture, it looks like the studs were supposed to be in the hub and lug nuts held the wheel. If that is correct, the studs were not "bottomed" and tight in the hub, only one was broken off in the hub.  If studs were not tight, they may have wiggled loose even if the nuts were tight. The studs should have sheared if they were tight.  Just a guess.

Edited by TexasJohn55 (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...
On 1/11/2021 at 6:03 PM, ak said:

Gave a visual check of both sides of the trailer at every stop, on the way up and on the way back.  No signs of a leaning wheel or loose lug bolts at least visual to the eye. 

 

put your hand on the tire and hub at every pee stop, you will know right away if something is wrong.

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  • 2 months later...

Were you able to recover the wheel?

The lug bolt holes and the wheel center will tell you what happened.  If they are battered like the hub and the lug holes are wallered out, the lug nuts were loose.  If the wheel is pristine and the lug holes still round with clean edges, you may have had some sort of explosive detachment.

 

I'd be inclined to suspect the wheel was loose.

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On 1/11/2021 at 6:03 PM, ak said:

Gave a visual check of both sides of the trailer at every stop, on the way up and on the way back.  No signs of a leaning wheel or loose lug bolts at least visual to the eye. 

 

 

I have an infrared thermometer and I check the tires & hubs at every stop to be sure none are "hot".  That along with a visual check.  Normally the temperature difference between the four tires is about 10degF and the four hubs about the same.

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20 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

I have an infrared thermometer and I check the tires & hubs at every stop to be sure none are "hot".  That along with a visual check.  Normally the temperature difference between the four tires is about 10degF and the four hubs about the same.

I agree with Larry but point out that here in the West, at least, you may get up to 15 degrees hotter readings on the sunny side of the trailer.  I "shoot" the temps on the treads, sidewalls, and hubs on each wheel.  Twice I've identified a slipping tread on a tire carcass and accomplished a pre-emptive change at a ruck stop rather than on the side of the road or on an off-ramp.  Those were 15" wheels, and I'll never own a trailer with less than 16" wheels again.

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I use a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) on each of my trailer tires. It monitors the temperature and tire pressure of each tire and reports it to the screen on the dashboard of my truck. If the tire pressure falls to Zero (tire blew) or the pressure goes above or below a set range the system sounds an alarm and indicates which tire has a problem. The same goes for the temperature monitoring.

 

On my trip to the National at Saratoga this week I noticed that the temperature reading for the tires on the sunny side of the trailer was about 5-10 degrees warmer than on the shady side. The tire temperature on each side was within a few degrees of each other.

 

I have also found that these sensors are very close to the temperature reading from my hand held infra-red thermometer.

 

For me, the cost of this TPMS system was worth it given the information it provides and it's accuracy.

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On 6/18/2021 at 9:22 AM, charlier said:

I use a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) on each of my trailer tires. It monitors the temperature and tire pressure of each tire and reports it to the screen on the dashboard of my truck. If the tire pressure falls to Zero (tire blew) or the pressure goes above or below a set range the system sounds an alarm and indicates which tire has a problem. The same goes for the temperature monitoring.

 

On my trip to the National at Saratoga this week I noticed that the temperature reading for the tires on the sunny side of the trailer was about 5-10 degrees warmer than on the shady side. The tire temperature on each side was within a few degrees of each other.

 

I have also found that these sensors are very close to the temperature reading from my hand held infra-red thermometer.

 

For me, the cost of this TPMS system was worth it given the information it provides and it's accuracy.

 

Charlie,

 

I've also looked at TPMS, but so far haven't found a good one which is designed for the 80 psi we run on our trailer tires.

 

I now have Load Range "G" tires instead of the "E" we had previously, but am unsure of the capacity specs on the rims, so have kept it to 80 psi instead of the 110 psi-

 

any thoughts from those of yoou who know much more about these than I do ?

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20 hours ago, Marty Roth said:

 

Charlie,

 

I've also looked at TPMS, but so far haven't found a good one which is designed for the 80 psi we run on our trailer tires.

 

I now have Load Range "G" tires instead of the "E" we had previously, but am unsure of the capacity specs on the rims, so have kept it to 80 psi instead of the 110 psi-

 

any thoughts from those of yoou who know much more about these than I do ?

 

Marty,

 

You might want to take a look at the system I am using made by Truck System Technologies. Friends of mine who own a Class A motor home told me about this system and use it on their rig.

 

507 Series 4 RV Cap Sensor TPMS System Color Display and Repeater 

 

According to the specs listed in the manual this system has a tire pressure range from 1 - 218 PSI and a temperature range from -40 degrees to 178 degrees Fahrenheit. Both the tire pressure and temperature monitoring features let you configure high and low alarm warning settings. This system has two different types of sensors that you screw onto the valve stems of our trailer tires. One is a Cap  the other is a "Flow Through" sensor. The Flow Through sensor lets you fill the tire with air without moving the sensor. With the Cap sensor you must remove it to put air in your tire.  I have the system with the Cap sensors and the color display. The sensors use a replaceable battery about the size of a dime that are inexpensive and can be found anywhere. The manufacturer says the sensor batteries last 1-1.5 years. Mine lasted over 2+ years but I do not leave than on my trailer tires all the time. When you remove the sensors from the tires they turn themselves off which saves the battery. BTW, in case you are wondering the sensors come with a special tool you use to install and remove them. It is a security feature that discourages theft of the sensor (you cannot just unscrew it with your hand and take it)

 

There is a LOT more information about this unit in the user manual (see link below).

 

507 User Manual

 

The installation and configuration instructions in the manual might seem complicated at first glance. The company has a number of easy to understand "How To" videos in the support section of their web site and on their You Tube channel. 

 

Product Support Information

 

YouTube channel instructional videos

 

Another nice feature is that you can configure multiple trailers and/or Trucks with this system by using separate ID codes.. Heck you could use this system on some of your Antique Cars that you tour with if you wanted. If your tow vehicle does not have TPMS you could buy additional sensors separately and monitor this tires as well. The beauty of this system is in it's flexibility to perform multiple roles.

 

If you shop around you might be able to find a lower price on-line. I bought mine on amazon.com. Since I use their smiles program and designate AACA as my charity the AACA gets a donation when I make purchases.

 

DISCLAIMER:  I Do Not work for this company or receive any compensation from them whatsoever for recommending their products. I am just a VERY satisfied customer.

 

If you have any questions just let me know.

 

Charlie

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8 hours ago, charlier said:

 

Marty,

 

You might want to take a look at the system I am using made by Truck System Technologies. Friends of mine who own a Class A motor home told me about this system and use it on their rig.

 

507 Series 4 RV Cap Sensor TPMS System Color Display and Repeater  

 

507 User Manual 

 

Product Support Information

 

YouTube channel instructional videos 

 

\Great option - Thank you Charlie,

 

I'd like to be able to monitor up to 8 tires at the same time since two of our three tow vehicles are older, and don't have built-in TPMS.

I just replaced the TPMS sensors on our '06 Avalanche - expensive but beneficial-

wish I had them on the '00 Excursion some years back prior to a blowout on the truck, passing a semi on the interstate while pulling the trailer - at night in a curve. Thankfully the truck driver recognized the situation and gave me room to recover

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On 6/21/2021 at 9:41 PM, Marty Roth said:

 

\Great option - Thank you Charlie,

 

I'd like to be able to monitor up to 8 tires at the same time since two of our three tow vehicles are older, and don't have built-in TPMS.

I just replaced the TPMS sensors on our '06 Avalanche - expensive but beneficial-

wish I had them on the '00 Excursion some years back prior to a blowout on the truck, passing a semi on the interstate while pulling the trailer - at night in a curve. Thankfully the truck driver recognized the situation and gave me room to recover

 

Marty, I believe this system can monitor a LOT more than 8 tires which would come in handy in your case. The manual appears to indicate that that the system can handle a trailer with 24 tires and a tow vehicle with 14 tires. The company offers kits of a variety when it comes to the number of sensors. My kit came with 4 sensors. I have seen a kit with 6 sensors. You can also buy sensors in 2 packs as well (which I did).

 

On my recent trip to the Saratoga Springs National it was interesting to see the system monitoring the tire pressure and temperatures. Each tire started off cool and at the air pressure I filled them to. At highway speeds (I kept it around 65mph) the air pressure increased about 7-8 pounds and the temperature hit a high of 90-92 degrees.

 

The other nice thing about this system is it's flexibility. If you use more than one trailer or tow vehicle you can move the sensors around and set up multiple profiles of tow vehicle and trailer combinations.

 

So glad your Excursion tire blowout ended well. I consider a Tire Pressure Monitoring System as an important part of my towing safety equipment. I just wish some other people that tow that I have seen over the years took trailering safety more seriously.

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