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1922 Buick Tourer cruising speed


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Hi all again,  I’ve been out and about in the buick and it seems to cruise at 56km per hour ( a shade over 30mph ). 
Is this about the correct cruising speed. I’m thinking the timing may be a little out. 
She also ran very hot on one occasion and was told it may be running too lean but that’s another story. 
She is testing me alright  😢

Thanks in advance, David 

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David

 

Looking at your older posts, it would appear you have a Model 35 4 cylinder 

 

Does anyone know the 4 axle ratio?  I’m not familiar with the 4s. 
 

In addition to advanced timing, balloon tires the next time you need them will give you 10% more speed and better stopping contact patch.  I was going to say for free but the tires sure aren’t. 

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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Thank you for the info on the timing !  I had a feeling that it may affect the operating temperature. 
 

Can some one with a similar car know the approximate cruising speed.  I don’t want to push it. 
 

Thanks again Dave

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David, 

     My 1925 Buick Standard is recently rebuilt.  I have the same rear axle, but I do have a different rim size than you and balloon tires.  They are 6" cross section instead of your 3 1/2".  I chose 2,000 rpm, because that is a good engine speed.  I can do 50 mph in my car.   45 mph is a little more relaxed, and I try to keep this as my upper limit.  It is very comfortable doing 35 to 40 mph.  Drop 3 mph for your car vs mine.    My car would be 1.5 MPH faster than yours back in the day, but I benefited from using the larger balloon tire as that is the only one available anymore.  Larry DiBarry's 1925-45 would be 4.5 MPH faster at top speed than my car if I had the original tires.    Hugh 

 

Buick Tire Size and speed.

Comparison of 1922 Buick 4 and 1925 Buick Standard 6 (Same rear axle)

1922 Buick rims are 23”, tires are 3 ½” cross section.

1925 rims are 22”, Balloon tires are 6” cross section.  (somehow it is “32 x 6” and not 34 x 6)

1922 Buick tires are 30 x 3.5”      30” OD = 94” circumference

2,000 rpm / 4.9 rear axle ratio = 408 rpm rear wheels (both cars)

94” x 408 = 38,352 inch /min = 3,196 feet/min x 60 = 191,760 ft/hr (divide by 5280 ft/mile) = 36.3 mph

1925 Buick with Balloon tires are 32” OD.     32” OD = 100.5” circumference

100.5 x 408 = 40,996 inch/ min = 3,416 ft/min x 60 = 204,979 ft/hr (divide by 5280 ft/mile) = 38.8 mph

For the 1925 Master, with the 4.54 rear axle

2,000 rpm / 4.54 rear axle ratio = 440.5 rpm rear wheels

100.5” x 440.5 = 44,270 inch /min = 3,689 feet/min x 60 = 221,351 ft/hr (divide by 5280 ft/mile) = 41.9 mph

1925 Buick Standard original tire “31 x 5”, but only the 32 x 6 is available. 

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19 hours ago, David Marshall said:

Thank you for the info on the timing !  I had a feeling that it may affect the operating temperature. 
 

Can some one with a similar car know the approximate cruising speed.  I don’t want to push it. 
 

Thanks again Dave

 

I'm no expert but I have my 2 cents. These cars have no seatbelts, no air bags, no crumple zones, my car doesn't even have a bumper. No test dummies were used for crash testing, real people were. Deaths per mile driven were off the charts in those days. I would never go over 30 in one of these flivvers. Besides dying, even worse, you would ruin the car!

 

Deaths per billion vehicle miles traveled is the red line on this chart. THIS MEANS YOU ( I hope not). 

 

 

 

 

DMV.png

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Maybe the uptick was due to the introduction of the free wheeling transmission (32 on chevies)  they got rid of it in 33.  I doubt prohibition actually refrained anyone from drinking...Per the cruise speed 40 was nice on my 22 buick roadster...35 was comfortable on my 4 cylinder buicks

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