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Looking for sheetmetal floor pieces for 1924 model 45


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Hi,

 

I'm in need of the sheet metal pan under the rear seat, as well as the curved plate just in front of the rear seat base.  There is enough left of the curved plate to use as a guide to reproduce but the floor pan is missing so I have nothing to use as a guide.  I'm looking to either buy used ones or if nothing is available does anyone know someone reproducing these sheet metal parts?  Or does someone have a drawing and dimensions to share?

 

Thanks, Ron.

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Ron

These are front and rear floor pans for my 25-45.  The front pan could be fabricated by any shop with sheetmetal shear and press brake by making a box with flanges on 2 sides.  Reproducing the stamped reinforcing feature at the bottom of the pan would increase the cost significantly as these are 1/4" deep.  They will probably offer to just form some beads in X pattern to stiffen up the flat bottom panel. The dimensioned sketch plus photo should be enough to make the front pan.  Corners are not welded. 

 The rear pan is a  much larger piece with a deep bump in the middle.  

Can you post a photo of your rear seat pan so we can see how much of it remains ? 

Kevin 

front seat pan original.jpg

front seat pan.jpg

rear seat pan original.jpg

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Rocketron:.

 See! Kevin beet me by a minute. 

 Sorry to say that you will have to have them reproduced. There are several here on the forum who can give you dimensions. I know in my 1925 Standard touring they replaced mine with plywood.

DSCF6539.thumb.JPG.5c2f7730bb3713e1389ef78bcc6ccad2.JPG

The 1925-45 has the same pieces. Simple pan with stiffeners stamped into them. If they are rusted out you may wish to check further into structural wood problems.

Edited by dibarlaw
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Hi guys,

 

Thanks for the info.  Firstly, my front pan is intact and in good shape.  It's only the back one that's the problem.  Looking at the photo that Kevin posted, it looks like the rear pan comes with the curved part attached, is that right?  All I have is the curved plate and initially I didn't even realize that there wasa back pan.  Here's a photo.  You can see the remains of the curved piece to the right.  And yes the wood needs work.  Could you send me the dimensions of the rear pan please?  Do you know the depth and dimensions of the bump?

 

Thanks, Ron.

20201213_130203.jpg

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Hi guys, one more thing.  Not to change the topic here but do you guys happen to have dimensions (and a photo) of the rear backrest seat spring?  Mine is missing so I'm going to have to build one from scratch but without one to copy I'd have to guess on the shape and dimensions...

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I will leave that question up to someone else who has had their back rest apart. Unlike later cars in the 1930s and up where the back rests are removeable these are fastened directly to the framework and upholstered over top of the springs.

DSCF5659.thumb.JPG.8d2a051a4892c4f2677b7c39875e65bd.JPG

These should be just about the same as the Standard as far as dimensions. Hugh may have an answer for you. We should be hearing from Apolo soon and see how he is doing on his 1924-45.

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Kevin, in one of the two links to other posts you mentioned: "the left side body contour front to back is slightly crooked in the center pillar area, while the right side, second photo, has a nice smooth contour.  I was able to improve the left side by making a new wood piece for the top of the center pillar.".  Mine is exactly the same but a bit worse.  I'm assuming it's because the drivers side gets more door opening and closing and gives way after a while.  I didn't understand your fix though, since I haven't yet investigated that area.  But your photos are very helpful to see what things look like underneath...

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Ron, 

    These are the seat back springs and dimensions for a 1925 Buick Standard.    You have a 1924-6 which is the same as a 1925 Buick Master.  Likely a small change in the size.   

The rear springs are held up with 4 or 5 straps of 3/4" cotton webbing.  The webbing and the seat covering is attached to the top side of the rear wood that is attached around the back of the car.  The convertible top is attached to the rear side of this wood.

Hugh

591302117_SeatSprings-Back.thumb.jpg.4c61bcba6275b3c65982dd47fb81ca36.jpgIMG_0026.thumb.JPG.864b7b0f2ca958837132d33a797e8279.JPG

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Hey Hugh, one more thing about the seat springs, did you reuse old coil springs or did you replace any with new?  If you replaced, did you find a source for new ones of the correct dimensions?  

 

In addition to my missing rear backrest, my rear bottom spring is badly corroded and at least 10 or more coils need to be replaced.  Those coils are heavier wire than the backrest coils.  Do you know a source for replacements?

 

Thanks, Ron.

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Ron 

I finally solved the driver side body contour issue this last summer while working on dents. There was a gap between door post wood and sheetmetal at back of rear door opening.  There is another sketch I will make up for you to check / verify some body width dimensions before you disassemble the body parts. 

Below is the rear floorpan sketch, not drawn to scale. 

Kevin 

rear pan.jpg

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The first pic has model 45 body width dimensions at upper and lower door openings, which is enough to get the body sheetmetal lined up correctly. Keep a copy of this handy.  This is a collection of measurements that Larry provided. 

Upper cowl door opening width is omitted because it is solid enough that it does not move.  Upper body measurements can easily be taken with tape measure over the top of the body.  I made a simple width gauge from 3/4 wood that drops over the top of the center pillar to hold / check the width.  

Lower door openings can be measured using a trammel tool. Measurement is taken in the jamb just above the door threshold.  You should check these dimensions and make notes as to which parts have moved.  Once you start disassembling that body, then everything moves. 

Kevin 

 

45 body width dims.jpg

center pillar width support.jpg

body rear door opening rear 48.125.jpg

body center upper 50.875.jpg

body rear door opening front 46.125.jpg

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Ron, 

   If you want to save a little money, the rear seat pan has a high spot  stamped in for the rear axle, if the suspension were to bottom out.  This would require a significant event to occur, and roads have improved immensely in 100 years.   No one sees the pan as well.  Pressing stiffeners in the pan is a good idea, or you could just make it a little easier and use 1 steel gauge heavier.  

On my car there is 7" of travel before the frame hits the rear axle bumpers.  There is 8 inches between the bottom of the pan and the rear axle.   I think the bump was put in the steel to make it look like the car had more ground clearance, but in reality,  the rear axle would not hit the pan even if the pan were flat.   That would provide a little more room under the seat as well.

Hugh  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ron,    

    I did not need to replace any of my seat springs.  There are some available if you check ford model T and model A websites.  The seat springs are stiffer than the seat back springs.

Hugh

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