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It never ceases to amaze me.


Dandy Dave
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Yep. It never ceases to amaze me at how many parts are still available for a Model A Ford. These cars are 89 to 93 years old and without any problem I can go online, search a parts list, and get stuff on it's way in a matter of hours. Try that with any other make of car the same vintage. Glad to see there is such a large following that keeps the parts suppliers and manufacture's of aftermarket parts in business. It is hard to believe these cars will be 100 years old within the next decade and still with such a large support system. What would Henry Ford think if he could see us now?   

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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I’ve been impressed by the availability of Model T parts, as well. I stopped at Lang’s Old Car Parts in Baldwinville, MA a few years ago because there were a couple of T’s parked in front. The owner said that the Henry Ford Museum had contacted him a few years before, wanted 10 Model T’s to use at the museum. He said he built them using 75% new or reproduction parts. He had several trailers out back filled with engine blocks and chassis for the rest of the parts.  The guys building T speedsters these days can buy all the speed equipment they want

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I had a 1929 Model A Tudor sedan when I was in H.S. circa 1970. At that time, my only sources for Model A parts were the few local Model A guys with extra parts they were willing to sell or from the “Model A section" of J.C. Whitney and Warshawsky catalogs. Whitney and Warshawsky parts were a little “iffy” some better quality others not so much. I did enjoy browsing those sections of the catalogs back then. :)

 

Earlier this year I purchased a 1930 Sport Coupe and am astounded at the number of parts available from the vendors today. The quality of the parts purchased so far have been good.  Like DandyDave pointed out you can have parts on the way in a matter of hours.

 

What would Henry Ford think if he could see us now or had known the Model A would be so popular and survive so long? Perhaps extended Model A production into the Model B and V8 era. However, time, engineering and developmental advances were marching on in the midst of the Great Depression. Model A/B engine production did survive as an industrial (diamond) engine until 1941 from most accounts. (Incredibly, the Model T engine to 1941 as well.) 

 

 

 

Edited by AzBob (see edit history)
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You could make a list of cars (and light trucks) that have a strong aftermarket following that helps keep the parts hunt to a minimum.  Some on my list would be:

1955-57 Chevy

1955-57 Ford Thunderbird

Corvette-most any year

Mustangs

Camaro to about 1976

Chevelle and Nova

1940s up Chevy pickup trucks

1930s up Ford cars and pickup trucks

There are probably more to add to the list but these quickly come to mind.  Almost any muscle car seems to have an abundance of parts suppliers back it up.  I would expect Buick and Packards to be well represented but I don’t have much firsthand knowledge on them.

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I sold my 1921 Paige partly because of the scarcity of parts.  I was always afraid something would would happen either mechanically or accident (body parts) .  It was the only 1921 Larchmont II in the registry. I was told  "you can get anything made".   Give me your checkbook and we'll see how that works.

I still have my 31 Plymouth after 50 years, but if I get another car it will be a Model A Ford just because of the availability of parts.

Edited by 31plymouth
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2 hours ago, 31plymouth said:

I sold my 1921 Paige partly because of the scarcity of parts.  I was always afraid something would would happen either mechanically or accident (body parts) .  It was the only 1921 Larchmont II in the registry. I was told  "you can get anything made".   Give me your checkbook and we'll see how that works.

I still have my 31 Plymouth after 50 years, but if I get another car it will be a Model A Ford just because of the availability of parts.

 

As a Rickenbacker owner, I know what you mean about parts availability.

My water pump went across the country a few times before I finally found someone I could completely trust to rebuild it and fab some worn out parts for it.

Most places didn't want to touch it because of the unique shape of the pump.

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Although a Model T or a Model A would be unsafe in modern traffic, it could still conceivably be a practical 'daily driver' in certain areas of the world because of repair parts still being readily available.   A Model A won't have to be laid up for more than a day or two because of parts unavailability, unlike some 20 year old cars where a part might take one to two weeks, or more. to arrive.    This is provided if one hasn't been spoiled by the low-maintenance factor of today's vehicles. 

 

Craig

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Seems I always end up with cars that parts are non existent...........if it were easy, everyone would do it. 

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Not everyone has the time, money or ability to handcraft every part needed for restoration.  For those who want to get into the old car hobby it’s better and less frustrating to start with a Model A or 1955 Chevy if you want to be up and enjoying the car in a reasonable amount of time.  The cars that require lots of one-off parts we’ll save for Ed.

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I hear you fellows on the rare car thing. Having a 1915 Buick Roadster and the machines and talent to keep it running myself has been a blessing. Also when several parts, a motor, and one parts car have shown up on the other side of the country I jumped on them and got them them back here. No place to call and order parts for a 1915 C-36 Buick Roadster at 106 years old. ( It rolled off the production line Oct of 1914.) 

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Whenever possible Collecting spare mechanical parts of uncommon pre war cars is always a good idea. At a minimum I like to have the entire chassis/drive line of “keeper” cars. Parts are always wanted. And often when selling a car I often do better on the parts than I do the car.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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7 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Whenever possible Collecting spare mechanical parts of uncommon pre war cars is always a good idea. At a minimum I like to have the entire chassis/drive line of “keeper” cars. Parts are always wanted. And often when selling a car I often do better on the parts than I do the car.

SPACE is a major consideration...  That's why my garages are absolutely stuffed.  Thanks for rationales to provide to our ladies.  And Happy New Year!

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

SPACE is a major consideration...  That's why my garages are absolutely stuffed.  Thanks for rationales to provide to our ladies.  And Happy New Year!


 

I also figure any spare part I have in inventory will never be needed. Sort of a reverse Murphy’s Law.

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19 hours ago, nickelroadster said:

The harder the parts are to find, the bigger the challenge and the bigger the feeling of accomplishment when they are found or made.  I wouldn't know what to do with a car that was easy  to find parts for.

I would!  I'd drive it to work everyday!

 

Craig

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While the parts availability for the A is excellent, bear in mind the best As (not ours, a true driver, which is fine with me), what we call fine point, use few or no repro parts.  A world of difference between 98% of the A hobby and those cars.  Which only showsthe A hobby has a fit for just about anyone.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

I also figure any spare part I have in inventory will never be needed. Sort of a reverse Murphy’s Law.

 

3 hours ago, padgett said:

and any spare you dump will be needed in 6 months.

Both true, but the inventory makes great trading stock for stuff you need but don't have--and which somebody won't let go for less than huge cash money.

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24 minutes ago, Grimy said:

 

Both true, but the inventory makes great trading stock for stuff you need but don't have--and which somebody won't let go for less than huge cash money.


To show how this works.......I found a Pierce Arrow engine in California..........too far away for me to chase. Close to George. I put him on it as a spare for his 1936 Pierce. George ended up with it........from a guy he knew forty years earlier...........it’s a small world in pre war car stuff. George.....that was about ten year ago.......have you started on the 1601 yet? 

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16 minutes ago, edinmass said:

George.....that was about ten year ago.......have you started on the 1601 yet? 

Paige rewiring PLUS smaller stuff begins Jan 11, the 1601 is behind that.

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When I got my 1915 Hudson SIX-40 from Dave Lanning I knew it previously had a long and positive history with Fred Long for many, many years. It came with a spare engine which was actually the original, totally worn out, partially sleeved and rusted, but complete engine. While storage space is at a rediculous premium, I've managed to keep it, thinking I would never need it. While on the AACA/HCCA Reliability Tour in Geneva, NY, the Hudson's current engine developed a coolant leak above, and leaking into #4 exhaust valve, running through the manifold and leaking out the muffler. Turns out the 6-cylinder block had so many cracks it would take more ability, patience, and $$$$$ than reasonable to repair, but no replacements seemed available, and this engine does not have a removeable cylinder head, further complicating the issue. Thankfully the lower end is in excellent shape. The spare engine upper block turns out to be in somewhat better condition and with the benefit of folks whose brazing skills far, far exceed mine, it was repaired sucessfully. Next, all six cylinders were bored and sleeved back to original specifications. New aluminum pistons were forged and fitted, and the "formerly kaput spare" block also donated several excellent valves for the rebuild. The engine now runs and the car is ready for road testing once the central Pennsylvania weather permits. If I had agreed to get rid of a "junk" engine years ago, I'd really have been in a heap 'o trouble,

 

I also have kept the complete spare driveline and suspension for our 1930 Packard 733 (formerly in Bob & Betty Thurstone's 733).

Tons of other stuff are crammed into a shed, an enclosed trailer, and an attic - hopefully never to be used - and likely to cause grief to our kids when I go to that big tour in the sky - or maybe they'll enjoy the spares when they inherit our toys ???

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My garage has both extremes. 1919 Chandler which there is virtually nothing out there for it, and a Ford Model A based speedster. I went with the Model A speedster for exactly the reason the poster mentioned- availability of parts and help.  I didn't want to speedster to become a project that gets stalled because of money or time.  Something breaks, I can get it back on the road quick and enjoy it. While it is not a daily driver it does see the road several times a week. In my opinion the Fords are a great way to enjoy a prewar car without having a huge investment in time and money.

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On 1/1/2021 at 5:24 PM, edinmass said:


 

I also figure any spare part I have in inventory will never be needed. Sort of a reverse Murphy’s Law.

Interesting discussion.  I once looked at a rare, one of a kind surviving car.  Flew to Reno and inspected and drove, should have bought but that’s another story.

 

Was buying from widow, if I bought, but well represented by a friend of family.  Late owner was a well known and talented guy.

 

When I asked if any spare parts came with car, I was answered with a smile and the comment “No, if something broke or needed fixing, he fixed it, saw no need to have piles of extra parts.....”

 

I liked that...

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18 minutes ago, padgett said:

Am the opposite. If something breaks I usually buy two.

Understood, me too... guess it depends on one’s fabrication skills, I can do minor surgery but major surgery isn’t in my wheelhouse....just threw that in, I think the term “in my wheelhouse” has affectations that don’t compliment the sayer, it’s bragging that one has a wheelhouse to start with, when one may be incapable of even FINDING the wheelhouse, much less being able to explain what the statement means...

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And friend who I work with is into Fiero's but was interested in an older car around the mid to late 20s to play with. He wanted something more uncommon but I was telling him to find a Model A. He looked at an Essex and a mid 20 Stude sedan  both ran but needed work, I kept telling him he needs to start with a Model A. First of there are lots of them around and if you have patients you can find the one you want and in your budget. Second if something brakes there is a large dealer network for parts and people around with knowledge of the cars that can and will help. Lastly I said if you realize a car of that vintage is not up your ally a Model A is something if priced right is not that hard to sell. Some of the more odd ball lower end brands can take a long time to sell. He eventually bought a 1929 4door sedan and has loved ever second of it...and when he needs parts he gets on the Snyders or MAC website and has parts within a week in most cases.

IMG_20161108_195231030.jpg

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Posted (edited)
On 1/3/2021 at 6:04 PM, trimacar said:

Understood, me too... guess it depends on one’s fabrication skills, I can do minor surgery but major surgery isn’t in my wheelhouse....just threw that in, I think the term “in my wheelhouse” has affectations that don’t compliment the sayer, it’s bragging that one has a wheelhouse to start with, when one may be incapable of even FINDING the wheelhouse, much less being able to explain what the statement means...

Why, Sailing with Captain Morgan has that effect. The wheelhouse becomes unreachable, and eventually one ends up over board trying to find the head. 

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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