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Is this an early White being crushed by a tank?


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A friend recently posted this interesting photograph showing what appears to be a WW1 tank crushing an automobile as part of a recruiting drive.   This could be the famed British tank "Britannia" that toured the USA.  On that tour I believe the traveled through 25 different cities crushing a car in every town visited.  The photo was supposedly taken in Duluth Minnesota. I'm sure it was exciting at the time, but wow, what a waste of a good (maybe even great) car.   Where are the old car lovers when you need them?  Someone should be rushing out to rescue what appears to be a good pair of Solar Eciplse headlamps.  I see they even left the brass horn on it!

Can you identify the car?   From the shape of the front it resembles an White?

Terry

Tank crushing car.jpg

Tank crushing a car.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Terry Bond said:

This could be the famed British tank "Britannia"

It does indeed have the Britannia name across the front of the hull.  Very interesting as the truck behind the tank names the Canadian Army but is covered in US flags.

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Oh boy, I saw this exact photograph identified either on this site or the MTFCA site in the past year and 1/2, and no, I do not recall the make or year of the victim car or know enough to conduct a forum search that will turn that puppy back up....

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16 minutes ago, Ben P. said:

Oh boy, I saw this exact photograph identified either on this site or the MTFCA site in the past year and 1/2, and no, I do not recall the make or year of the victim car or know enough to conduct a forum search that will turn that puppy back up....

 

 

 

Oh, come on, I don't own or know how to use a cell phone but found this video. Bob 

 

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=WWI+Tank+crushing+car&&view=detail&mid=D166F9D80115D027108ED166F9D80115D027108E&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearc

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1 hour ago, Terry Bond said:

A friend recently posted this interesting photograph showing what appears to be a WW1 tank crushing an automobile as part of a recruiting drive.   This could be the famed British tank "Britannia" that toured the USA.  On that tour I believe the traveled through 25 different cities crushing a car in every town visited.  The photo was supposedly taken in Duluth Minnesota. I'm sure it was exciting at the time, but wow, what a waste of a good (maybe even great) car.   Where are the old car lovers when you need them?  Someone should be rushing out to rescue what appears to be a good pair of Solar Eciplse headlamps.  I see they even left the brass horn on it!

Can you identify the car?   From the shape of the front it resembles an White?

Terry

Tank crushing car.jpg

Tank crushing a car.jpg

 

The second picture is a different car, in Toronto on a rainy day.  It can be found in the Toronto Archives. They must have finished off a good number of cars.  It has under-running board storage boxes.  Could it be a 1911 Stoddard-Dayton?

Edited by PFindlay (see edit history)
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Apparently they did a lot of this.... Please no more videos or pictures of this sort of thing. It’s torturous. Nearly as torturous as my grandfather telling about one of his paid jobs before getting drafted in 1944 — shoving cars into an exhausted gravel pit for the dealer charged with disposing of the cars donated to the local “scrap drive” (the biggest myth since a certain cherry tree that may or may not have ever been cut down).

 

(I think the boys were paid a bottle of Coke and a candy bar for the work. He probably had almost as much fun doing that as he did telling me about it 40 some years later.)

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5 hours ago, 3macboys said:

It does indeed have the Britannia name across the front of the hull.  Very interesting as the truck behind the tank names the Canadian Army but is covered in US flags.

There is a Union Jack behind the Canadian army sign on the truck.  I wonder if the gentleman in the kilt is a Canadian Highlander?

 

Edited by dictator27 (see edit history)
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23 minutes ago, dictator27 said:

There is a Union Jack behind the Canadian army sign on the truck.  I wonder if the gentleman in the kilt is a Canadian Highlander?

 

I hadn't noticed that gentleman before but I think that you just may be correct, just to his upper right is a couple of other men in uniform that look like they could either be US Army or Mounties based on the headgear.   I found another fuller image and it looks like this was June 14th or 19th of 1917.  I had no idea that the Canadians would have been involved in a recruitment drive in the US but it makes sense given the location.  

 

Britannia in America - Page 2 - Other Equipment - Great War Forum

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On another thread, we were discussing 

how quickly cars depreciated and became

obsolete in the early era.  The fact that they're

crushing a rather large car less than 10 years old

shows that that car didn't have much value to

anyone.

 

I suppose they were as ambivalent about that car

as we might be about a 1989 Hyundai sedan---

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51 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

On another thread, we were discussing 

how quickly cars depreciated and became

obsolete in the early era.  The fact that they're

crushing a rather large car less than 10 years old

shows that that car didn't have much value to

anyone.

 

I suppose they were as ambivalent about that car

as we might be about a 1989 Hyundai sedan---


my teen daughter drives a 2006 Hyundai Tucson that I gave the paltry sum of $1,500 for.... It is an appliance more than an automobile and I hate driving it.... but... somehow it has become the most reliable car in our fleet.... I would give the square body burb to the tank!

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May be the Canadian Army was with the British Army Tank because they were in the Commonwealth.

I guess they were encouraging the USA to join in the War ?

In Newfoundland some fishing villages were completely destroyed as all the men were drafted in the the same Unit and killed in Battle.

Then there were was only woman left to fish in the Ocean and they couldn't and left the village.

 

 

In 1914, Canada was a self-governing dominion of the BritishEmpire, but it did not control its own foreign affairs. ... In 1914, most, but by no means all, Canadians would have agreed with the 1910 statement of Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier that “when Britain is at war, Canada is at war.

 

 

Canada Enters the War - Canada at War | Canada and the First World War

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A lot of people in the United States of America were in favor of entering the war from the beginning, in spite of USA's and President Wilson's determination to remain neutral. Many young men joined into Canadian or French forces. This is especially true for some that wanted to fly in the new air corps. Several American (later) aces joined early and went into either English or French air corps units and remained there until the end of the war or death whichever came first. Motor corps, including tank units, were also a new thing that attracted many young men into joining foreign forces.

Canada sending a tank unit into the USA for recruiting purposes makes perfect sense.

 

Interesting thread. Thank you.

 

 

 

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On 12/29/2020 at 3:46 PM, dictator27 said:

There is a Union Jack behind the Canadian army sign on the truck.

Thank you for mentioning this.  Another example of what 350+/- years of common usage can do to a language.  Originally the flag was called the Union Flag.  Originally when flying on the jackstaff of a ship at sea it was called the Union Jack and only then

 

Sometime around 1674 the British flag became formally known as the 'Union Jack' when mounted on a warship and the ship was not in harbour. At the same time the British flag was referred to as the 'Union flag' on land

 

A jack staff (also spelled as jackstaff) is a small vertical spar (pole) on the bow of a ship or smaller vessel on which a particular type of flag, known as a jack, is flown. The jack staff was introduced in the 18th century.

 

In 1801 the flag combines aspects of three older national flags: the red cross of St George for the Kingdom of England, the white saltire of St Andrew for Scotland and the red saltire of St Patrick to represent Ireland.

 

Today all and sundry seem to refer  to the "Union Flag" as the Union Jack"

So endeth the lesson for today. ☺️☺️

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Tinindian,

I like your lessons. Especially this one.

I have always had a passion for learning, born that way. Etymology has long been one of my many passions. Reading this particular "lesson for the day", my mind is flashing literally hundreds of times I had heard or read the term "Union Jack" used incorrectly. Language must be flexible, be able to adapt to changing needs for expression. However, Words and phrases need to mean something. They should remain stable unless and until needs actually require a change. New words need to be formed from old roots to express new ideas or situations. Blurring the lines between meanings do not help actual communication. The difference between the "Union Jack" and the "Union Flag" should still matter.

My, "opinion", for the day.

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I always hear that the flap up the side of an Australian's hat was to keep from knocking it off when slinging or unslinging a rifle.

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22 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

I like your lessons. Especially this one.

Thank you Wayne. 

I know there are many people here and on other fora who are not big into correct/specific nomenclature.  The only problems I have ever had either buying or selling, both locally and to over fifteen foreign countries in the last 60 years has been three times and it has always been due to descriptions.  I now do not even reply to  someone looking for parts to buy or to sell if they do not use the parts book description of said part.

 

I was even looking to buy a vehicle.  In the ad it rambled on and on and at one point said the vehicle had oak spokes.  I drove several hundred miles to look at the car.  After listening to the owner expound about all the things he had restored I asked him who re-wooded the wheels.  He told me they were original at which point I turned to leave.  He followed me out to my car and offered that he was willing to listen to offers.  I told him I would not even consider his car as I had no confidence in his "restoration litany" if he did not even know what kind of wood the wood spokes were made from.  I noticed that the ad remained for many months.  This was the last time I even considered anything that was not described correctly.  My one exception is dealing with anyone who does not have English as their Mother Tongue.  If they are civil I try and usually am successful in helping them.

 

One of the most wonderful things on these AACA forums is the button that shows up when you hover over a person's avatar.  The one that says ignore user.  I have several now that I don't even see so I am not distressed or upset by their content.

 

Happy New Year to all on this forum.

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" if they do not use the parts book description " - a parts book is not only essential but can be entertaining. I love what GM called a "Chromed Styling Panel".

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