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41 Super thermostat replacement


henry clay
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Drain system just enough to get the level below the thermostat. It doesn't have to be empty.
Remove two bolts holding thermostat housing in place.

Remove old thermostat.

Clean gasket mounting surfaces.

Install new thermostat.

Install new gasket and replace housing.

Tighten to snug but don't crack anything.

Refill system.

Test drive and check for leaks.

 

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Maybe your temperature gauge is not working or your new thermostat is stuck open.  Even though it is new sometimes they fail.  You could approach this either of two ways.  Get one of those inferred digital 'point and shoot' thermometers at the local auto supply.  This will tell you the exterior temperature of your engine/radiator or what ever you point it at.  Or,  pull the temperature sensor out of your engine and immerse it in water of a known temperature to see if you get a reading on your gauge.  

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23 hours ago, michealbernal said:

Or,  pull the temperature sensor out of your engine and immerse it in water of a known temperature to see if you get a reading on your gauge

 

Just a word of caution if you end up trying to remove the temperature gauge sensor.  They are generally very hard to remove since they commonly get corroded and jammed into place after years.  The tube leading to the sensor is also very delicate and can easily be broken off during a removal attempt if you are not extremely careful.  If the tube is broken, that's basically the end of your temperature gauge.

 

I think the infrared thermometer is a much better idea.  I doubt that the failure of the temperature gauge to move has anything to do with the new thermostat.  Even if it's stuck open, the engine will eventually warm up to around 160 or 180 (depending on what thermostat you installed).  Take a temperature reading off the thermostat housing and you will have a pretty accurate idea of the temperature of your coolant.

 

If the engine is hot and the gauge is not moving, it might be that the needle is jammed somehow at the gauge end.  Number one question: was the gauge working before you replaced the thermostat?

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