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Rejuvenate Weather Stripping


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This may or may not be an issue. I bought sight unseen some NOS weather stripping, circa 1979+. Although made for 1979 they may be a bit newer. The price was really good and the repro parts have known fitment issues and are backordered as well. Figured for less than the price of backordered repro I could  not go wrong. Then I started hearing of old rubber being dried and hard and unusable. I hope I didnt spend a lot of money on a piece of trash. Is there a way to freshen up not so new rubber?

Until I get the piece I have no idea what the condition is, they may be perfect for all I know.

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I have some door seals I bought back in the late 70s planning to use them in a year or two and ran across them last year still in the box. Opened it not expecting much and they still looked and felt brand new.

 

On some 70 year old rubber on my 1950 Ford F1, I wipe them down with generous amounts of glycerin every year or so and it doesn't make them look new but keeps them flexible.

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On 12/20/2020 at 10:41 AM, TAKerry said:

Until I get the piece I have no idea what the condition is, they may be perfect for all I know.

 

You may not have anything to worry about--

wait and see what they look like and you're

likely to be happily surprised.

 

In temperate climates, weatherstripping lasts

for many decades.  It's typically in hot and dry

desert exposures that weatherstripping gets

hard and crumbly.  If not in such an extreme

climate, the original weatherstripping on the

typical 1979 car is in excellent shape, both

cosmetically and functionally.

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Glycerin ? 

From Wikipedia: Glycerol is generally obtained from plant and animal sources where it occurs in triglycerides, esters of glycerol with long-chain carboxylic acids . The hydrolysis, saponification, or transesterification of these triglycerides produces glycerol as well as the fatty acid derivative.

 

It can be bought in drug stores but large containers are available on Amazon. Lately it has been mixed with alcohol to make hand sanitizer. 

 

I found out about it from a friend that has actually restored unobtainable tires for display/very slow driving. One was so hard he thought it might break if he dropped it. I have used it on old tractor tires to seal/fuse age cracks by just rubbing generous amounts on the cracks. The fellow that restored tires soaked them in glycerin in a trough large enough to soak about a 1/4 of the circumference at a time. He told me you have to be very careful if you soak rubber in it. It will melt the rubber if you leave it to long all you have left is goo. 

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An update for those that were here, got the weather strips and they are fine. Nice and soft and flexible. They are NOS GM for 1979 but who knows when they were made. I assume they still made parts many years after the cars were gone? Anyway, crisis diverted, once installed I will give them a good once over with 303.

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A solution of one part oil of wintergreen to 3 parts rubbing alcohol and soak the rubber parts in, monitor every 30 minutes or so as it does have a swelling effect on the rubber but will soften old rubber.  An old trick from the motorcycle guys to soften carburetor boots.

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