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Found-Great Degreaser and Rust Remover-Power Seat Assembly Finished


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I am posting to share with all of you 2 great new products I have found to make parts restoration easier. One of my winter projects was to disassemble, clean, lube and reassemble my power seat track assembly. Mine was rusty, dirty and caked with decades old grease. For many years my go to degreaser was Blaster Parts Wash. I love that stuff however, it really did not do much to the hardened, caked on grease. Then there was the rust. I do not have access to a blast cabinet and a wire wheel is not going to be of much help. I did some research on line and came up with a product that I was going to try for each situation.

 

For the grease and oil I used Oil Eater Cleaner Degreaser. This product is fantastic. It comes in a concentrated form so that you can mix to fit your needs. It is a water based solvent, biodegradable, has a pleasant smell and is safe on any material. For my needs I used a 1:1 mix. I scraped what I could off and then soaked my various parts in the solution. It did not take long before the grease and oil just seemed to melt away. I did use a toothbrush and a small wire brush to remove stubborn deposits. This did not take much effort as the solution had done its work to soften and loosen those areas. Once the part is clean, rinse with water and dry. 

 

For the rust removal I used Evapo Rust Super Safe Rust Remover. It is biodegradable, non-toxic and easy on the skin, eyes and nose. This product also worked like a charm. First, you need to remove any oil or grease from the rusty part. As with Oil Eater just soak the rusty part in Evapo Rust. For larger parts you can soak paper towels in the solution and cover the rusty area. While soaking the rust seems to melt away. The thicker and older the rust the longer the soak. For heavier rust I did take the part out once in a while and scrub with a toothbrush or a small wire brush under the faucet to help speed the process and help preserve the Evapo Rust. A great thing about the Evapo Rust is that it is reusable. You can reuse over and over again until it starts to lose effectiveness. I let the impurities settle to the bottom before I poured it back into a container. Once you are done with the rust removal, rinse and dry. 

 

I have attached pictures of the products. Another bonus is that these products are inexpensive compared to some other products. I also have attached before and after pictures of some of my track assembly pieces. 

 

Bill

 

 

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Edited by Riviera63
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I know that Evap o rust is fairly expensive; what's the cost of a gallon of the Oil Eater?  If you have the time for it to work, a 9:1 solution of water: molasses does a great job. Molasses at a feed store is about $4 / gallon.  A gallon will make 36 gallons of rust remover.  I did a power seat frame as well. Came out great, but the solution is not kind to non-iron parts.  Molasses too is biodegradable. 

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I've been using Oil Eater for 3 years or more and like it.  It is especially good for cleaning light grease and oil off a painted engine or chassis components without removing paint or dulling the finish.  Within the past year I could no longer find it in one-gallon bottles in my area, and had to buy a 5-gallon pail for about $63 at O'Reillys.  I have decanted the five gallon pail into one-gallon jugs which I mostly use to refill one-quart spray bottles.  Unlike molasses, it is neither messy nor stinky, but I can see the utility and economy of molasses for soaking something as large as a seat frame.

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After stripping of oil, grease and rust, how do you intend to protect the bare steel from rusting again?

 

I think these parts were originally unfinished, except for perhaps a thin film of oil. That's why they are rusty today.

 

On other old cars I have used a satin finish clear lacquer in a spray can. It stops the rust but the metal looks original. Helps to preserve the car.

 

😎

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5 hours ago, Ben Bruce aka First Born said:

I have used, and still do, Evapo Rust.  Good stuff. a little costly as Ed said.  MUCH quicker than the molasses.  Have not tried Oil Eater.  Will now!  Thanks, Riviera63.

 

  Ben

 

The Oil Eater was $9.36 and the Evapo Rust was $15.36. I bought both on Amazon, so no shipping cost. Both took very little soaking time to get the desired results. I did not think that the Evapo Rust was that badly priced as compared to other rust removal products that I saw out there. The Evapo Rust can be reused. I have the whole gallon left minus a couple of ounces. This will last me a long time. Buying online saved me a trip to the feed store as well. Plus, I did not have to supply my own container. Of course, Evapo Rust is not as good on pancakes.

 

Bill

Edited by Riviera63 (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Jim Cannon said:

After stripping of oil, grease and rust, how do you intend to protect the bare steel from rusting again?

 

I think these parts were originally unfinished, except for perhaps a thin film of oil. That's why they are rusty today.

 

On other old cars I have used a satin finish clear lacquer in a spray can. It stops the rust but the metal looks original. Helps to preserve the car.

 

😎

 

Jim,

 

I think I am either going to do the clear lacquer or use a bare stainless steel look spray paint. I have the Eastwood version. I also have Rustoleum Stainless Steel Appliance Epoxy Paint which I have used with good results in the past. I am not sure which way I will go yet. Will post pictures when I get the project finished.

 

Bill

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For rust I use the old chemical make up in Rustoleum Aircraft Remover. I’ve also used hydrochloric acid to remove rust. 
For deep clean of aluminum a cocktail of hydroflouric, hydrochloric, and phosphoric acid typically gets the aluminum clean. The stuff requires full safety gear to work with acid. You must be careful.

Grease removal can be knocked out with Berkible 2+2 Gum Cutter. The Berkible 2+2 Gum cutter is about $3.00 for 12-14 Oz aerosol can and goes a long way. Don’t let 2+2 get on any paint.

To protect the metal after chemical treatment I wash the piece with mild soap and water. Then I wipe it TP Degreaser, wipe off the Degreaser, then TP final wipe solvent. Let the metal air dry. If necessary I’ll degass the workpiece at 400 degrees for half hour. If the metal is good steel I hot flock the piece and cure it at 400 degrees F for 20 minutes.

If it is aluminum I’ll powder coat cold.

All the chemicals I use are harsh, but seems what I get is harsh. The Buick steel wheels I powder coat come to me with a full measure of rust. The wheels must be clean clean or the powder coat does not look good.

Good to learn about Evapo Rust I’ll give it a try.

Bill, thank you for your complete report including the pictures. Great job with subject and post.

Turbinator 

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35 minutes ago, RivNut said:

Another quick and really good grease cutter is Brakleen. I buy it by the gallon. 

I've used that one before...have had good luck with it in the past.

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  • Riviera63 changed the title to Found-Great Degreaser and Rust Remover-Power Seat Assembly Finished

In response to Jim's question up above I decided to coat with the Rustoleum Stainless Steel Epoxy Spray Paint. There were some areas that were discolored from rust or whatever and there had been a welding repair on the right front leg of the track. I wanted a more uniform appearance so I went with the paint. I rewrapped the wiring harness and cleaned and lubed the transmission.  I also pulled out the armature to clean and sand the commutator bars smooth and lubed the shaft bushings. I got it all back together this afternoon. Everything runs smoothly and works the way it should. It was a fun project but, also a good one to get done. Now on to the next project!

 

Bill

 

 

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On 12/18/2020 at 6:52 PM, J3Studio said:

 

That looks great! Also, I love the "casual" background.

 

Thanks for the compliment. That "casual" background is part of the wallpaper of my shop. It is my favorite place to hang out. I go there for inner peace and solitude. 

 

Bill

 

 

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1 hour ago, EmTee said:

LOVE those Rocky & Bullwinkle posters!  :lol:

 

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They are a couple of my favorites. I found them at an antique store. Of course this dates me but, Rocky and Bullwinkle was at the top of the cartoon hierarchy for me as a kid growing up. 

 

Bill

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I've mentioned this before so pardon the redundancy, if it seems familiar. With regards to the use of molasses and large enough part to require an outdoor soak. We live in the Cascade foothills about as close to wilderness as one could imagine. We coexist with the wildlife, most of which are seldom seen. During the occasional snow event the animal tracks tell the tail.

 

When I read the comments on the use of molasses I always chuckle. If I left a bathtub full of molasses mix, I could be absolutely be sure that it would be seen as an open invitation for any critter bold enough to make the visit. I doubt that we would have to wait for the snow, or for the sun to go down, to make their acquaintance. The bear for one would ignore his nocturnal nature and be there post haste. I've never tried molasses, and I won't be trying it any time soon. I don't have to imagine what would happen, history can be a great teacher!

 

bill

 

  

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Evapo rust works even better and faster heated. I use a small crock pot dump all the bolts and small brackets wait a couple hours, done.  
 

the seat tracked look good. The paint reminds me of Eastwood detail gray. 

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  • 1 month later...

Just to put a finishing touch to the degreasing and rust removal of my power seat assembly. I got the wiring rewrapped and the seat assembly mated to the driver's seat which just got back from the upholstery shop where new foam was put in. Tested again and everything still works as it should. A stretch of below zero weather here has me longing for spring and getting those seats back in the car.

 

Bill

 

 

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I just saw this topic surface again. I remember the first really good degreaser/cleaner I found. When I was about 15 years old a Kentucky Fried Chicken opened on the corner of Main St. about a block and a half from me. I already had about 4 years of home car work, tire shop work, and junkyard hanging around so I knew how hard it was to get the deep ground in stuff off. The first visit to the chicken place was filled with amazement. Nothing to that point had been so good at cleaning my hands. It lifted dirt from deep in the pores (so good I got my first girlfriend shortly after).

At that point in my life I had already learned the difference between clean dirt and the bad really dirty dirt. That is a concept my wife has never been able to understand. Chicken fat with old car grease mixed in would never hurt you. A couple of years later, when going to the car auctions, Tony, the wholesaler who rode with us, would stop at a small grocery store, buy a half a loaf of bread, and some cold cuts. Dirty thumb and finger prints on the bread was not problem either. Cold cuts cut grease pretty good, too.

You know, I write things like this and sit back thinking about the people whom have missed out on those kind of things.

 

I wonder how many people see the KFC sign and don't even know what it stands for. Turns out the state of Kentucky trademarked the word Kentucky and they had to change all the signs. They probably think it stands for Kernal Canders.

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Bill, I see you are quite the collector of American folk art from many facets of our great country.

outstanding work on the seat mechanism. Looks great and a true testament to your attention to detail.

I can see you can shoulder most any load that comes your way.

Turbinator

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