Jump to content

Franklin Gas gauge


Recommended Posts

I had to get a really stuck Series 11 gauge out at the Trek without aid of shop tools, so it can be done if you work carefully and don't rush it.

 

Soak into the threads with a good rust penetrant, such as Liquid Wrench or similar. Repete each day for several days.

 

Use a well-fitting wrench. Don't try to unscrew it on the first try. Slightly wiggle it back and force to loosen the threads without turning far enough at first to over-stress and crack them. Once it wiggles without needing a lot of force, start unscrewing it. When you feel the resistance to turn increasing, stop, give the threads another spray of penetrant and wiggle it backwards and forwards again to work loose the corrsion in the threads. Repeat as needed.

 

Paul   

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Got it with out braking it!!!! Thanks. Wow is the tank bad. Looks like someone put a sealer in it years ago and about 3/4 of it deteriorate. I am going to cut hole in the back side then patch. Thanks again

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the sealer yellow ? If so, that is early Bill Hirsch sealer that is not alcohol proof. If it is white it is the later alcohol resistant sealer. If it is another color I have no idea what it is. 

 

Cutting open the tank is not always the best way to go. It causes it's own problems while trying to solve another that is not as difficult. In 40 years of cleaning /sealing gas tanks I've only had to cut open one,.... because it had 22 dents in it from a bad rear end accident, plus then being driven to ruin offroad and abandoned in the desert. 

 

 A good soaking and rinse with solvents, such as "fast" ( least expensive grade) lacquar thinner. Blown dry and then do a cocktail shaker with gravel, then another rinse,  does a very good job of preping the tank for slosthing with the white Bill Hirsch tank sealer. desite what some think a good sealer like the Biill Hirsch white alcohol resiant sealer, the inside of the tank does not have to be perfectly spotless of rust to be seal well for decades. 

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a friend tell me a interesting one on cleaning a gas tank .  He used a drill and cut a piece of cable about 2 feet long, or ever it takes for the size of tanks. Puts the cable in and turns the drill on  and that flops around about every where. Sounds good and I think Ill try it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, rjp said:

I had a friend tell me a interesting one on cleaning a gas tank .  He used a drill and cut a piece of cable about 2 feet long, or ever it takes for the size of tanks. Puts the cable in and turns the drill on  and that flops around about every where. Sounds good and I think Ill try it.

Steel cable floping around inside the tank,.... sounds like a good way to get a spark for an explosion. If your going to do that, I'd suggest running car exhaust, or other innert gas into the tank to push oxygen out. 

 

Paul

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/14/2020 at 9:54 AM, rjp said:

Thanks, Iam in the prosses of making a socket for it now and trying to soak. Might have to take tank out so that I can get to the threads better

 

I bought an 8 sided socket on Amazon that is a quite good fit, but haven't yet tackled trying to get what seems to be a good unit, complete with level needle and the handle that is in a spare tank I have.

 

Roger

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A socket that spreads the force over all the flats is best, but not easy to come by. 

 

That time on the green at the Trek, I was able to use an old smooth-jaw monkey wrench I always carry in the tool boxes. I fit the full surface of the gauge flats better than a modern adjustable wrench would. That, plus patients and a lot of luck payed off. A proper socket would have saved a few minutes and reduced the risk of getting broken pot metal dropping down into the tank.

 

Now, if we can just get Jeff to make more new gauges,....  😁

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I use POR gas tank sealer kit. Eastwood sells it. If the tank is very rusted fill it with dawn dish soap and smooth rocks. I have a big tumbler that I set it in but if you do not have that luxury find a big cement mixer and strap it to the inside. roll it for about 15 min or 1/2 hr. then use the kit. They look like new after this procedure.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my 151 tank dipped by radiator co for 2 nights and the NAOH cleaned everything INCLUDING rust ? 
EDIT>>   After NaOH, then rinse with baking soda water mix, then soapy water to final clean, then put in a little diesel fuel and slosh it around, the oily fuel will coat the inside if the tank and keep it from flash rusting!
Good shops do the neutralizing only.

Franklin gas tank.JPG

Edited by Franklin31
add (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you remember to add Marvel Mystery Oil to the tank at each fill up, that will not only protect the tank, it will also clean and protect the entire fuel system and right up to the top piston rings.  

 

Adding about 25% MMO to the valve pad oil also prevents sticking valves. 

 

Paul

Link to post
Share on other sites

If your going to salvage the original gauge, know than pot metal can be porous. That's how moisture gets in and causes the inter-granular corrosion that makes it swell and crack. I never knew this until I had some potmetal door handles cast and used an original, uncracked  potmetal handle as a pattern for heat-cured rubber molds. The molds were full of bubble holes as the handle heated up and out-gassed into the rubber while it was curing.

 

Now, I clean the pot metal in solvent, dry it, and then soak it with WD-40. The WD-40 penetrates the potmetal where ever moisture can and helps keep moisture out. 

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...