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Pot Metal Restoration


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I seem to recall reading of a company that restores pot metal castings. For the life of me, I can't recall where I read this information. Does anyone recall seeing this article and the company's name? 

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I could not find anyone who would touch my Cabriolet windshield which was filled with pits and cracked in places. Sherman's plating in Sacramento agreed to look at it. The quote was breath taking high but he explained why. Each pit had to be drilled to good metal and filled and welding was difficult. The windshield that was in the weather for 50 years turned out beautiful. When I asked if he would give a discount for cash he politely said he lost money on the job and no. They really took their time on it.

 

Not sure if the the same crew is there but they are 

 

Dave 

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
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I would question the logic of repairing a pot metal item.  The faults that occur over time such as pitting , expanding or cracking will surely continue ?   Any Metallurgists out there who can comment?
I have always replaced pot metal items by casting a new brass replacement using using an original repaired with bog.

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It is untrue that pot-metal (ZA alloys) had too much zinc in them.  I learned from an old caster that the problem with zinc die cast parts is that when they were running, if the surface didn't look good enough, the foreman of the shop would reach into his pocket and drop some lead into the pot of melted metal to smooth up the surface.  The flaws you see 70+ years later are from the lead NOT the zinc.

I start my melts with almost pure zinc and add aluminum pop cans and copper wire to give the castings a much better surface look and good strength.  Zinc will dissolve  cast iron, copper and aluminum among others.

The problem with welding up die-cast is the old lead, not the zinc.

Pot-metal Restorations in Florida used to use the baby shoe approach to repairing die-cast parts.  They would use a copper spray coating over body filler and fiberglass repair to put a nice chrome finish on parts.

I make repairs to old die-cast parts for my plater, which I have used for over 45 years.  Not fun stuff to work with, but it can be done.

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On 12/9/2020 at 8:05 AM, Bloo said:

I recall someone posting in several threads here offering pot metal work. I just searched and could not find it. However I wonder if it might have been this company? I have no personal experience with them.

 

https://potmetal.repair/

 

Yes, this is the company discussed in an earlier thread. I had James repair some cracked bolt holes on a license frame and am very happy with the results. Turnaround was pretty reasonable, a few weeks. Also used Sherm's Plating (have been using them for decades) and have always been pleased with their work, too.  As noted, their turnaround is long, but worth the wait.  I've posted some pictures of the frame below.  If they appear in the correct sequence, the first two are the "before" photos, the third is after the pot metal repair, and the fourth is post-rechroming.

 

 

DSCN5133.jpg

DSCN5130.jpg

DSCN4744.jpg

DSCN4857.jpg

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On 12/9/2020 at 8:06 AM, Dave39MD said:

I could not find anyone who would touch my Cabriolet windshield which was filled with pits and cracked in places. Sherman's plating in Sacramento agreed to look at it. The quote was breath taking high but he explained why. Each pit had to be drilled to good metal and filled and welding was difficult. The windshield that was in the weather for 50 years turned out beautiful. When I asked if he would give a discount for cash he politely said he lost money on the job and no. They really took their time on it.

 

Not sure if the the same crew is there but they are 

 

Dave 

Hello Everyone.

I've actually used Sherm's. They do a good job on plating.

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...Btw, we've upgraded our equipment and process for faster and even better results. Our process and our attention to Quality yields the quality that simply cannot be overshadowed.

 

Thanks so much to all our invaluable customers. You are greatly appreciated!!!

 

James Ruther - Onwer/Operator

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Many companies repair pot metal. Doing it properly is labor intensive and expensive. I've used Qual Krom in Erie, PA with excellent results. Sherms is also a top-notch provider if you're on the west coast. There are others equally skilled. None of them are inexpensive.

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I looked into reproducing these early die castings using investment casting by having the part read into a computer; then making some corrections ( to remove the cracks and ajust for the swelling ) via the computer then 3D printing the part in wax.

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