Jump to content

General Chuck Yeager - RIP


Uncle_Buck
 Share

Recommended Posts

He led a great life.

 

On one site, it’s stated that his accomplishments were spectacular, but his personality was lacking.

 

It was said he could turn on some charm when needed, but in real life he wasn’t a very nice person.

 

Mentioned that to my wife, she said “He didn’t have to be nice, look at what he did....and the sad thing is that most of this generation wouldn’t know his name.....”

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, trimacar said:

 

Mentioned that to my wife, she said “He didn’t have to be nice, look at what he did....and the sad thing is that most of this generation wouldn’t know his name.....”


Impressive it only took three replies to get to ”kids these days...” 😂

Edited by Car-Nicopia (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Car-Nicopia said:


Impressive it only took three replies to get to ”kids these days...” 😂

Every generation since the first caveman crawled out into the sun has it’s version of “kids these days”.

 

Kids these days will be saying about their kids, “kids these days”....

 

Nothing wrong with that.  Each generation grows up in a different world, with different opinions and values.  Makes life interesting.  Just think, three generations from now kids won’t even know what “petroleum” means!

 

(that’s a tongue in cheek comment, by the way, even windmills need 60 gallons of oil each for their gearboxes, and if the British make solar panels they’ll need oil to make them somehow leak)

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, trimacar said:

Every generation since the first caveman crawled out into the sun has it’s version of “kids these days”.

 

Kids these days will be saying about their kids, “kids these days”....

 

Nothing wrong with that.  Each generation grows up in a different world, with different opinions and values.  Makes life interesting.  Just think, three generations from now kids won’t even know what “petroleum” means!

 

(that’s a tongue in cheek comment, by the way, even windmills need 60 gallons of oil each for their gearboxes, and if the British make solar panels they’ll need oil to make them somehow leak)


All true. I’m making fun of this because it’s so pervasive on this forum. I love prewar cars. But I spend less time here then other forums because too many threads turn into an echo chamber of this sort of thing. I can only imagine how real “kids” introduced to this group react. I suspect they leave.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I understand.

 

If oldsters don’t get out and see the interest of young people, then the assumption is made that kids these days don’t care about old cars.

 

Yet, I know of an under 40 year old who just bought a Model T and is tickled with it!  OK, so that’s not THAT young, but there’s interest out there.

 

Will the hobby change?  Sure, always has.  Will we lose heroes specific to certain generations like Yeager?  Sure.

 

And the world keeps spinning....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The company I worked for signed General Yeager as our spokes person before the book The Right Stuff came out. He was a great spokes person and when ever I saw him he was very gracious and engaging.

 

He once told a story about getting his old Chevy  truck going and he described the AC plugs as diamonds in a goats XXX. Needless to say he kept about a thousand sales people entertained for days.

 

Dave 

Edited by Dave39MD (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He led a special spectacular life, these no doubt about that. He supposedly had a major regret in that he wasn’t chosen for the astronaut program and wasn’t the first man in space for the USA.  There are also stories he would get in a plane and ask the mechanic how to start it, knowing if he knew how to do that he would probably be the test pilot as he had an advantage over any other test pilot on the base. Quite a character. 
dave s 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, mobileparts said:

That is truly Amazing !!!!

    We should rename December 7 th -- Chuck Yeager Day.....

 

RIP Mr. Yeager, Condolences to your loved ones (that includes all of us in this thread !!!!)

 

RETHINK what you posted pal, or are you  clueless as to what happened at Pearl Harbor? 

Bob Swanson

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm from north of the 49th and December 7 is not as revered here as south of the 49th but I agree 100 percent with Bob Swanson.  "A day of infamy" and a hero are not nearly the same thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

You can't look at a P-51 Mustang without thinking of him, a truly Great American, Thank you for your service, Rest in Peace. 

 

 

Bob 

Or the Bell X-1. 

I hope he and Bob Hoover are having good times.

 

Thanks for posting this topic Uncle Buck.

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, trimacar said:

He led a great life.

 

On one site, it’s stated that his accomplishments were spectacular, but his personality was lacking.

 

It was said he could turn on some charm when needed, but in real life he wasn’t a very nice person.

 

Mentioned that to my wife, she said “He didn’t have to be nice, look at what he did....and the sad thing is that most of this generation wouldn’t know his name.....”

 

Other than having the typical fighter pilot personality, I've read and heard (from those who knew the man) that Chuck Yeager was one of the "Good Guys" with an engaging personality.  If you're not a fighter pilot (I'm not one), the fighter pilot personality (self-assuredness, arrogance, etc.) can be a bit off-putting; however, it goes with the territory of being one of the "cream of the crop".   Any good pilot, not just fighter pilots, is comfortable with his/her skill, and this sometimes comes across as just a bit arrogant. 

 

Just as an aside, the next time you watch the movie "The Right Stuff", pay attention to the scene in Pancho Barnes'  Happy Bottom Riding Club.  The grizzled old bar tender is Chuck Yeager in a cameo appearance.

 

R.I.P. Chuck Yeager.  Another of my boyhood heroes "gone west".

 

Grog

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Locomobile said:

James Watt and Mathew Bolton, brilliant mechanics and the fathers of "horsepower" shunned trained engineers and expressed that they would only interfere in their work.

 

Richard Trevethick who went on in 1800 to develop high pressure steam, the first practical self propelled road vehicle in 1801, the first passenger carrying taxi in 1802 and developed the first successful rail locomotive in 1803, had no formal education at all. Deemed unteachable at age nine he left school and went to work at his fathers mine. Edison left school around the same age for the same reason.

 

As one old blues musician put it "You either are or you ain't'' 😁

Chuck Yeager was another one. His H/S education would not allow him to be a astronaut. And if Chuck were a H/S graduate today he would never be able to fly in the military at all.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

HFAs can be brilliant (IQ often over 150) but may be essentially unteachable.

 

One characteristic is doing things without having to ask.

 

Think USAF was first to require officers to have degrees mainly because they could and still have enough applicants. Of course those who grandfathered in...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, padgett said:

HFAs can be brilliant (IQ often over 150) but may be essentially unteachable.

 

One characteristic is doing things without having to ask.

 

Think USAF was first to require officers to have degrees mainly because they could and still have enough applicants. Of course those who grandfathered in...

Thank you doctor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...