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Hi Fellow Brush Owners,

 

I purchased my 1912 Liberty-Brush in 2013 and drove it only a few times before the wheels came apart on me. I've since had new wheels made and purchased new tires, but she's been sitting for 6 years and I'm finally putting her back on the road.  I have a few questions and will be posting questions as I go. 

 

When I purchased the car, the oil tank was mounted on the dash but the oiler was not.  The previous owner said it leaked badly so he put the pictured Lunkenheimer Sentinel on instead.  It's not correct for the car but fortunately, I have the original.  I've cleaned it up and replaced the cork, so it should be fine.  I don't know how it's installed though.  Seems simple, as there are only 2 holes in the dash, the top one obviously connects to the tank, but  the hole is rather large, and the nut passes right through. The only thing I can figure is that maybe it's used to adjust how far it goes to meet up with the oiler.  If not, perhaps the top (larger) hole isn't correct.  With the tank on the other side, I don't know how the nut would be adjusted or tightened.  I'd appreciate confirmation if anyone can help.  I'll assume I also need to find some type of gasket or seal to go between the oiler and the tank.  

 

Pictures attached; the last one is obviously the incorrect oiler, but showing how it went through  the dash.

 

Thanks in advance,

Dave

 

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Edited by in2antiques
typo (see edit history)
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I have the same set up on my '12 F Model. I mounted the stock oiler to the firewall first. The bottom jam guy is set so the top portion will insert into the tank and seat against the cork gasket. When the tank is installed the three mounting bolts will seat the cork gasket. If the seat is not tight, I have added an additional cork gasket to form a better seal. You could also mount the tank first, and measure the depth of the stock oiler and adjust the mounting nut on the oiler. I have done it both ways and had good results. Hope this makes sense. Good luck 

Skip in MN.

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 Hi Skip,

 

Thank you so much for your reply. This is the only car I have with this type of set up for lubrication. It didn't appear that the dash has been altered, but I wasn't certain. What you said makes sense. If I have any problems hooking it up I may reply again, it'll probably be sometime after the holidays. Again, this car's been on blocks for about six years and I'm anxious to have it back drivable. 

 

Thanks,

Dave

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Thanks Dave,

 

Scroll down to Jonah's post (23 replies) and see the oiler pictures that I gave him. One concern that I had was that the oil line hole may be to large on your firewall. It appeared to be larger than the washer. If that is the case, glue in a new wood plug and drill a smaller hole. The firewall thickness could be 7/8" or possibly 1". 

Just curious about your headlights, I had one on my Brush but it was to early. Do you have any i.d. info on your lights?

Thanks, Skip 

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Hi Skip,  thanks for the additional information. I'll have a look over the weekend and let you know about the lights. I've had several folks tell me the lights are not correct, the seat is not correct, the wheels are not correct. Etc. etc.  Others have told me that Brush was grabbing  parts from anywhere they could to complete their last year production, and the 1912 liberty models had parts from Ford, Maxwell, and other manufacturers to complete the build.  Mine has one of the last known serial numbers (engine SN),  so anything's possible. At this point, it doesn't matter.  I just want a nice drivable car.   I'll share in later posts what I believe is original, and what's not, due to the paperwork I have and other clues I found.  

Attached is a picture "as found" when I was bringing it home.  The  prior owner said it was absolutely original, (except for the yellow paint, which will change).  I had nothing to compare to and had never seen another with lights like this, but he swore they're original.   I also haven't been able to determine what else they might have been on.   I'd been searching for a one cylinder car for several years, and had never heard of a Brush until seeing the advertisement on the Horseless Carriage club website.  I had to have it.  As noted in my first post, I only drove it 30 to 40 miles and that's been many years ago.  Can't wait to have it back on the road.

 

Again, thanks, Dave

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Thanks Dave,

I can see that the head lights and cowl lights are not Brush, but they look nice. Like you mentioned, there may be quite a few items that need to be changed out over time. I like what you have and if you can get it running and back on the road, that's what counts. Let me know if you need any info.

Skip    

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Hi Skip, forgive my very delayed response.  Thank you.  I've had several folks tell me "not Brush" on the lights, but they look nice and I honestly wouldn't have known the difference. I wasn't able to find any identification on them so no idea what they were from.  

 

I'll post pictures down the road when the car's back on the road. Hopefully, not too far down the road!

 

All the best,

Dave 

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