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425 Nailhead Lifter Noise


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Hi All,

I thought there was a thread on this already, but can't find it.

 

My 64 Riv, 425, dual quad engine sometimes at start up will have some lifter noise, but seem to go away when I start driving it.  Is this common with a Nailhead?

 

Art

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Hi Art,

  Its not uncommon or unacceptable for a lifter to occasionally bleed down and take a minute or two to pump back up. But if the pattern is consistent and obvious or takes a long period of time to go away there could be a mechanical issue like a bad lifter, cam lobe going flat, low oil pressure, etc...it`s really a matter of degree.

Tom

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Tom,

Thanks.  I did not think was was anything to worry too much about.  Sometimes at shows when you start it to leave it may do it, and someone feels the need to tell me about it.  I just thought I would asked the question here.

 

Thanks again and Happy Thanksgiving.

 

Art

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Art, I had this problem with my 322 nail head several years ago. One lifter would tick at start up, after the engine had set a while. I was advised by a friend to get a can of Slick 50 engine treatment. S 50 is a highly concentrated synthetic oil treatment. He said his (chevy) engine was doing the same thing and Slick 50 cured his. My engine is an original with 125K miles on it so I thought. what can I loose? Its S 50 or an expensive engine tear down. I got a can and added it according to the directions. The tic went away and has never returned even with several oil changes. Normally I am not one to use  "canned" repairs but it worked for me! ...Ed

 

 

 

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I used to get that start up tick too. I still happens but no where near as often as before. I think it is because I started using 10-40 oil , was using 10-50 before and more importantly, in my opinion, is I don’t let the car actually start until the oil pressure light goes out by cranking over with the starter. Car is 1965 Rivi gs

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Art,

  Keep in mind, often a "tic-tic" sound from an engine is not necessarily due to a lifter or the valve train. Among the possibilities are belt noise, an exhaust leak or an accessory mechanical component.

  Believe it or not belts can make a noise that one would swear is a metallic type noise. This is easily troubleshooted with a spray bottle of plain water. Spray a light mist of water on the belts as the engine is running. Dont choose the wrong side of the engine! If the noise disappears or subsides you have found the source of the noise.

  It is very common to experience an exhaust leak at the head to exhaust manifold sealing surface because the bolts stretch and/or loosen. This often sounds just like a lifter because the source of the leak is a single cylinder and can be easily troubleshooted by shorting out the plugs, one by one, in the general area. If shorting out a plug makes the noise disappear you have found the culprit.

  I recently completed a heater core and hvac component refurb on a local members `64. I noticed what sounded like a lifter tic when I picked up the car but my and the owner`s priorities were otherwise. At some point I was walking around the running car and the noise sounded like it was coming from lower than the top of the engine. I used a mechanics stethoscope and checked at the valve cover, then the alternator, then the water pump and finally the fuel pump. The fuel pump was the source ( it was a "lighter" sound compared to the infamous Riviera knock) and was very pronounced. Changing out the fuel pump, cheap insurance anyway as he plans to drive the car to the next ROA annual meet, solved the problem.

  The above are examples of very common experiences in cars in general and not restricted to our Rivieras.

Tom

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I had an older Ford van that was my camping/canoeing vehicle.  After a certain amount of time following an oil change but not yet time for an LOF, I'd get a ticking noise in one of the lifters.  Because the old 302 would burn a quart of oil every 700 - 800 mile, I would add a quart of ATF to the oil.  Run it until it cleaned the junk from the lifter then do an oil change.  Don't know why but that one lifter would get dirty and the ATF would clean it out for a while.  This was something that I'd learned from my dad from when he used to work at the local Buick garage.

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Bernie,

 

   Checking the rocker arms for wear would be nec. ONLY IF he was getting a constant ticking noise from the valve train. A ticking on startup & then goes away after a short period of time is NOT rocker arm or shaft wear.

 

Tom T.

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I would check them just because of the number of nailhead Buicks I have owned. It's easy to do and eliminates the assumption that they are OK. I would check them if a car was new to me and I was just putting in new valve cover gaskets. At the same time I would see how much wiggle I got out of the valve stem just for my own satisfaction.

Only a few bolts ans you slide the arm back against the spring. I even have spares.

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Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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