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They want HOW MUCH??????


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I got through the lengthy diatribe about how the color is almost original and how clear coat makes things look different (then why do it?) but he lost me at "I have drove it..."  Correct grammar may be knowing who your relatives are, or it may be just good English...

 

Hope he likes the car a lot, don't think anyone's buying it at six figures....

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1 hour ago, Machine Gun said:

It's obvious that the guy's wife is making him sell it. "Gee honey, I listed the car but no one showed the slightest interest in it. I can't understand it. I guess I'll try again in Spring."

LOL - that is the best explanation of such a ludicrous ad. 

 

It is a nice example of the car I guess but I have never liked that weird swept-back styling.

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It's a strong price, but I don't think it's necessarily a ludicrous price. Excellent 1959-60 Electra convertibles trade hands at auction pretty regularly in the high 5-figure range. That one has an awesome color that's a love it or hate it thing, but you only need one guy to love it. Colors don't usually command a premium (it's usually the other way--bad colors demand a discount) but for the period I think it's spectacular, especially if that's how it was originally built. Too many red and white ones laying around as it is, even though that's always the safest choice. And if this was a Cadillac, nobody would even raise an eyebrow at that price. The Buick is rarer, more powerful, lighter, faster, and arguably just as luxurious and well built as the Cadillac, with styling that is nearly as dramatic. It ain't a '59 Cadillac, but I don't think anyone has ever regretted owning a big Buick like that. He might be off by $30-40,000 but he's certainly not off by $100,000 as someone suggested above...

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Keep in mind that this vehicle has some factory options that I believe make it exceptional. Factory A C, factory bucket seats, and I see power vent windows in there too. Who knows what else it has?  Meanwhile it was not a factory correct restoration which compromises its value to me.  

I hope he finds a buyer that loves that car.  If money was more plentiful to me it would be a car I would pursue. 

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On 11/23/2020 at 7:01 AM, Machine Gun said:

It's obvious that the guy's wife is making him sell it.

 

I have advertised cars saying my wife said I had to sell it but if it didn't sell I could keep it. It is a good ploy to be used sparingly.

 

My favorite reply to the price being too high is "Buy the other one". I know I have the tone of voice just right when I can use it to make my friend, Mike, blow coffee out of his nose.

 

Bernie

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

I have advertised cars saying my wife said I had to sell it but if it didn't sell I could keep it. It is a good ploy to be used sparingly.

 

My favorite reply to the price being too high is "Buy the other one". I know I have the tone of voice just right when I can use it to make my friend, Mike, blow coffee out of his nose.

 

Bernie

 

 I like Mike

 

  Ben

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I have no clue what a Buick in this era trades for.........that said, there are only two things that matter on pricing this car.............Lets take Matt's number of 75k for a selling price. 

 

 

Problem number one: Today, in this market, 75k buys a lot of automobiles compared to a few years ago. Thus....any purchaser almost has to want this particular year and model, otherwise they will walk away looking for a better "deal" on something else. To be honest, I like the car, but rather have three 25k cars from the post war era to play with......and today 25k will buy fun, interesting, turn key cars...... so there is a lot of market dynamics for cars in this category. Any post war American car has a lot of competition when it comes to selling.......and I think these market dynamics and now here to stay.

 

Problem number two: While I am sure you can't restore the car for Matt's number of 75k, finding a 50's and 60's Buick guy who has the experience and willingness to pay the extra money for a great restoration is not easy.....certain cars there is a market where people have the extra disposable income to pay more for great things.......but that isn't usually associated with cars from this particular era. Spending 20k more for a great car will pay off in the long run in restoration and service costs, and when you sell, you will recover a larger percentage on your investment. An identical car that is a original repaint with so so chrome and upholstery will sell easier because of the tip in price........but the exit price will be a much different story than the car above. 

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17 minutes ago, edinmass said:

Thus....any purchaser almost has to want this particular year and model...

 

That was my conclusion as well.  Not impossible, but certainly won't be a quick sale.  And, for what it's worth, I'm also in agreement with Ed when he says he'd rather have three $25K cars.  If I had $75K to dedicate to classic car purchase I'd do just that -- enjoy each for a couple of years, then sell and find a different 'new' old car to experience.

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I sure don't have the $75 Matt mentions or the $125. Sitting here with about 60 years of experience I would, generally, stay away from a restored car and limit my purchase to the best original car I could find. There are a lot of skills that come into play during a restoration. Bringing all of them together on one car is a giant feat. I don't think there are many instances where the score would meet 90% of the expectations.

 

Going back over those 60 years I have in the hobby and starting again I would make it my goal to buy a nice 15 to 20 year old car every 10 years and maintain them the best I could.

Show me a $75,000 car and I can give you a list of items you can read in your easy chair. The total will be about $7,500. It always works that way.

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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