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for Sale: 1953 Nash Ambassador - $7,800 - Stroudsburg, PA - Not Mine


58L-Y8
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for Sale:  1953 Nash Ambassador - $7,800 - Stroudsburg, PA

https://poconos.craigslist.org/cto/d/bartonsville-1953-nash-ambassador/7231606875.html

1953 Nash Ambassador (Airflyte), Pinin Farina Edition, Hydra-matic, 252, 6 cylinder, 61,216 original miles, Heater, Radio, Iconic Flying Lady hood ornament, Beautiful original 2-tone paint (Cruiser gray w/sea mist gray), Excellent original condition, Always garaged,  Runs, Clear title,  Very rare classic, Original owner's manual, Original repair manuals, Free delivery within 50 miles, Serious inquires only, please!

Contact: Matt (570) nine-7-7-8-8-7-six

Copy and paste in your email:   1bbfff8c596231eebc231a7b9262a834@sale.craigslist.org

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this  for Sale:  1953 Nash Ambassador sedan.

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The engine question is intriguing. A now deceased friend had a full-sized Nash, I think a '53 or '54 that had only a 184 cu engine. And the late NYC jazz DJ Rich Conaty made much mention of his 1950 Nash which had a happy place of about 45 MPH. The Rambler was definitely pitched as an economy car but the full-sized Nashes seem rather luxurious in many ways.

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6 minutes ago, Peter S said:

The engine question is intriguing. A now deceased friend had a full-sized Nash, I think a '53 or '54 that had only a 184 cu engine. And the late NYC jazz DJ Rich Conaty made much mention of his 1950 Nash which had a happy place of about 45 MPH. The Rambler was definitely pitched as an economy car but the full-sized Nashes seem rather luxurious in many ways.

Good likelihood the full-sized Nash had its original engine replaced with an available service engine, either factory remanufacture or used replacement.  Dealers weren't all that concerned once it was a used car.  The 184 c.i. would bolt right in place of a 195 engine.    As far as the 1950 Nash Statesman ran a 184, not much engine for a car its size and weight.  The 1949 600 had a 173, must have been a gutless wonder!

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the '49 looked like a zepplin and likely floated along like one -- I hadn't thought whether this represented a shift or just different marketing strategies, but the contrast between collegial Nash names like "Ambassador" and Hudson's more martial sounding WWII aircraft carrier names must have represented quite a clash of corporate cultures

 

Edited by Peter S
further thought (see edit history)
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Hudson, even in the pre-war years, had cultivated something of a 'performance' image in its advertising.  On the other hand, Nash promoted the versatility and economy as primary reasons to own a one.  One writer characterized Nash as the auto equivalent of your old maid great aunt Edna: solid, sensible, had money in the bank...but was no fun at all!  

Edited by 58L-Y8 (see edit history)
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Full sized Nashes did sometimes come with the small engines. A "Statesman" or it's predecessor the "600" was a full sized Nash with the small flathead engine. This design was also used in early Nash (and Hudson) Ramblers. The engine is very short, more like a four in length, and frankly you wouldn't be able to just shove some other six in there.

 

The Nash Ambassadors were the top of the line full size Nashes had a big overhead valve six. The nose of the car typically had to be about 8 inches longer than a Statesman to make room.

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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As I recall, at least in 1950, the lower series Statesman had the Flathead Six-cylinder,

while the upseries Ambassador had the OHV Six.

The "600" wassold alonside the Statesman and Ambassador through 1949, but was discontinued after the 1949 model year - at least per my aging memory.

My father's 1950 Statesman was notoriously underpowered, as Dad frequently reported, having been the replacement for our 1942 Chevrolet Special DeLuxe

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The small engine, short wheelbase 600 sold through 1949 when the name changed to Statesman, both being the Series 40.   Fitting a longer dash-to-front-axle length to the shared bodies was standard practice for many medium-priced segment cars to create an upper-series model line.  AMC was one of the last to build a car that way, with the 1974 Ambassador. 

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9 hours ago, Peter S said:

The engine question is intriguing. A now deceased friend had a full-sized Nash, I think a '53 or '54 that had only a 184 cu engine. And the late NYC jazz DJ Rich Conaty made much mention of his 1950 Nash which had a happy place of about 45 MPH. The Rambler was definitely pitched as an economy car but the full-sized Nashes seem rather luxurious in many ways.

I sure miss Rich Conaty and his show

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