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Ever smash or bang up the family car or worst wreck it ? This young fellow totalled his father's $3.4 million car


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Moment spoilt 17-year-old YouTuber crashes his billionaire dad's one-off $3.4m purple Pagani Huayra Roadster before taking to Instagram to say 's**t happens'

  • Gage Gillean, 17, crashed the multi-million dollar purple hypercar in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday evening 
  • His father, Tim Gillean, is the founder of Dallas-based private equity firm Cross Equities and owns an entire fleet of high-end vehicles 
  • The teenager, who has 84,000 subscribers on his GG Exotics YouTube page, suffered minor injuries 
  • Gage posted footage on his YouTube channel on Wednesday detailing the crash before subsequently switching it to private 
  • He says he lost control of the car due to low tire pressure and crashed into a tree 
  • He later posted a photo of himself on Instagram with his left arm in a sling
  • In an Instagram story, Gage wrote: 'S**t happens. Thanking God for a second chance at life. Crash could've left us with worse injuries or even death'
  • It is not yet clear what caused the crash, but those who saw the wreckage claim Gage may have lost control of the car and crashed into a tree 

It is not yet clear what caused the crash but those who saw the wreckage claim Gage may have lost control of the car and crashed into a tree

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10 minutes ago, Mark Gregory said:

Moment spoilt 17-year-old YouTuber crashes his billionaire dad's one-off $3.4m purple Pagani Huayra Roadster before taking to Instagram to say 's**t happens'

  • Gage Gillean, 17, crashed the multi-million dollar purple hypercar in Dallas, Texas on Tuesday evening 
  • His father, Tim Gillean, is the founder of Dallas-based private equity firm Cross Equities and owns an entire fleet of high-end vehicles 
  • The teenager, who has 84,000 subscribers on his GG Exotics YouTube page, suffered minor injuries 
  • Gage posted footage on his YouTube channel on Wednesday detailing the crash before subsequently switching it to private 
  • He says he lost control of the car due to low tire pressure and crashed into a tree 
  • He later posted a photo of himself on Instagram with his left arm in a sling
  • In an Instagram story, Gage wrote: 'S**t happens. Thanking God for a second chance at life. Crash could've left us with worse injuries or even death'
  • It is not yet clear what caused the crash, but those who saw the wreckage claim Gage may have lost control of the car and crashed into a tree 

It is not yet clear what caused the crash but those who saw the wreckage claim Gage may have lost control of the car and crashed into a tree

 

At work we referred to that as more car than talent!

 

And yes I have and the drive home (and imagining what was about to happen) to report the damage to my father was far worse than the actual response that I got.

 

Don  

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35 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Good for him! That will employ a crew of skilled technicians to rebuild, their Thanksgiving arrive just on time. Those things are manufactured to be driven, wrecked, rebuilt. Capitalisms is a wonderful thing. Bob  


 

A little bit of super glue and it will be fine............they’re  banning plastic bags, maybe plastic cars will be next. 3.4 Mil for that piece of trash........nuff said.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Low tire pressure lol. No doubt it's insured to the hilt. He can laugh it off and have a funny story to tell at Christmas dinner. It's nice to be a rich kid.

 

"His father, Tim Gillean, is the founder of Dallas-based private equity firm Cross Equities and owns an entire fleet of high-end vehicles "

In case you were wondering where your pension money went.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Good for him! That will employ a crew of skilled technicians to rebuild, their Thanksgiving arrived just on time. Those things are manufactured to be driven, wrecked, rebuilt. Capitalisms is a wonderful thing. Bob  

Paid for by all of our insurance premiums.

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People GROSSLY under-estimate how quickly things happen in a seriously fast car. They look at NASCAR or F1 and figure they could do that with a little practice. No you couldn't. Few people can. That's why we're not all racing drivers.

 

I'm honestly shocked that they let 700 horsepower Dodges out the door of dealerships with just anybody at the wheel. When things start to go sideways in a big horsepower car, it's already too late by the time you notice, and cars like the one wrecked in this article are on an even more razor-thin edge. Once it gets away from you, there's just no way you're gathering it back in. Hell, Paul Walker was killed when a professional driver was at the wheel of a car like this (although the Porsche was known to be especially treacherous). I had an SCCA competition license for a dozen years and there are still cars I won't drive because they are just too treacherous.

 

To think a 17-year-old kid could handle such a thing should almost be criminal negligence. If someone had died, the father should have been prosecuted for letting it happen. I remember spinning my mom's 225 horsepower Mustang GT in 1987 when I was 17 and the roads were a little wet and cold. Scared the shiat out of me, but nothing happened other than I knocked the alignment out of kilter when I hit the curb. Important lesson learned. This article is about a car with three times as much power and 50% of the weight as that Mustang. You almost have to be superhuman to manage that thing at the edge.


Kid should be so thankful he's not dead that it should completely end his desire to be a public screw-up.

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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It's the same syndrome that Jon Jon Kennedy had...........Money does NOT make you smart, better looking, or indestructible. Kennedy killed his wife and sister in law because he was arragont and stupid. What a lesson to learn.........money doesn't make you a skilled pilot over water in a piston powered aircraft at night in poor weather. I knew that lesson at 15 years old, and I was not particulary bright. The sin is he took people with him to the grave. 

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Kennedy wasn't just rich and stupid he was arrogant beyond belief. He had at least six stirikes against him before he even got in the plane. Thats basically being out twice in baseball. When I was getting my private license my instructor always said if you have 1 concern you better really think about going up that day. If you have 2 you are really pushing it and 3 means you are going to cause some problem you may not survive so stay on the ground until you resolve all of them.  Kennedy had six known problems he didn't even come close to resolving. 

1. He had a cast on his foot.

2. His wife and sister in law were late so he was frustrated.

3. His instructor told him weather was coming in and he would be happy to go along to the island and then fly back to get them home. He refused and said he could handle it.

4. His wife hated to fly in a small private plane - preferred first class jombo jets.

5. His weather report was 2 hours old - he didn't pull a new one after his wife arrived.

6. His instructor advised him to fly the coast then when he saw the island make the turn instaed of a direct over the water flight, he ignored it.

 

I suspect this kid has that same arrogant attitude.

dave s 

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My observation is that having money reduces one's ability to read minds.

 

Think about it. You rarely hear a wealthy person say "He or they think..... whatever."

 

But the poorer the person the more likely "He thinks", "They think", or "She thinks" will come spewing out.

 

Well, I should write the poor and the actors whom portray the evening news.

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Dave....had no idea he had all those issues also. I absolutly love aircraft..........but I know my limits, my personality, and my shortcomings. I love to fly planes, with PROFESSIONAL people sitting next to me. Since I like breathing an awful lot, I gave up my ideas of a WWII piston machine after spending enough time around them will just enjoy them from the ground. The B-17 that crashed recently was a plane I had been on many times.......and one of my high school buddies was on it.....and didn't survive. 

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3 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I'm honestly shocked that they let 700 horsepower Dodges out the door of dealerships with just anybody at the wheel.

 

For some comedic relief, here's a video of a

high-horsepower car driven at at dealership.

Race driver Jeff Gordon posed as a mild-mannered

mini-van driver taking a test drive, and took the

unwitting salesman on the high-speed, fast-cornering

ride of his life!

 

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, SC38DLS said:

Kennedy wasn't just rich and stupid he was arrogant beyond belief. He had at least six stirikes against him before he even got in the plane. Thats basically being out twice in baseball. When I was getting my private license my instructor always said if you have 1 concern you better really think about going up that day. If you have 2 you are really pushing it and 3 means you are going to cause some problem you may not survive so stay on the ground until you resolve all of them.  Kennedy had six known problems he didn't even come close to resolving. 

1. He had a cast on his foot.

2. His wife and sister in law were late so he was frustrated.

3. His instructor told him weather was coming in and he would be happy to go along to the island and then fly back to get them home. He refused and said he could handle it.

4. His wife hated to fly in a small private plane - preferred first class jombo jets.

5. His weather report was 2 hours old - he didn't pull a new one after his wife arrived.

6. His instructor advised him to fly the coast then when he saw the island make the turn instaed of a direct over the water flight, he ignored it.

 

I suspect this kid has that same arrogant attitude.

dave s 

Very true on all counts.  It was a very foreseeable accident.

 

When I was getting my pilot license, the instructor gave the best advice one could get...if you feel uncomfortable in a situation, make the decision to get out of the situation.  On my solo cross country, I took off one morning to follow the Shenandoah Valley south, but on the east side of the mountains.  About ten minutes in, a mist came in over the mountains, not blinding but visibility became much less.  Uncomfortable, I turned around, expecting to be laughed at for returning twenty minutes after taking off.  Quite the opposite, after explaining, the instructor complemented my good judgement.

 

I love small planes and low and slow flying, but an oh shit at altitude can really ruin your day if you’re not smart about it...

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When my best bud and I were young { late 1970's } we were both flying mad. My grandfather was a AME, my father a recreational pilot that had to give it up once a mortgage and family arrived. But we both still got in enough light plane time that the bug was firmly attached.

 My friend became a glider pilot, glider instructor and licenced pilot through air cadets , all at a very young age. I was a full time student through all of it and didn't have either the inclination { cadets } or time /$ to go through the

process.

 But my friend was a very good pilot despite his young age. Several long , multi day trips across the Pacific North West. Lots of demanding mountain flying in typical dodgy B.C. , Alberta and Washington State conditions.

We both learned to pay very strict attention to weather reports { as they existed at the time }, and really read the situation we were flying in to. We both became very skilled { for our age } in map reading and course plotting.

We made a number of flights that raised some eye brows amongst the older guys in the airport coffee shops,,,

You came here , from there, in that ??? { often a 172 , but also frequently a 150. Not IFR rated but we both knew the

basics and sometimes had no choice but to use the skills. Weather changes very fast in this part of the world.

Looking back , we were  very lucky a couple of times at least. But it was a great part of both of our youth, wouldn't change a thing.

Of course like many things that people could afford in the 1970's , the 1980's priced sport flying well out of our reach. But still some really great memory's.

 We had one experience that made reality all to vivid. Low on gas and running out of weather we radioed out intention to land at Cranbrook B.C. airport. The tower said we could not land , my friend explained our situation and we were reluctantly given permission. Unknown to us ; we had been flying for a few days, a 737 had hit a snowplow when landing the day before. What a mess. We landed but it was a very surreal sight. Still gives me the shivers to this day.

 

Greg

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Porsche 930 in its day was a favorite of newly minted tech geek and show biz millionaires, and a lot of them got wrecked within weeks of being sold.

I saw an interview of racing driver Danny Ongais, former top fuel dragster turned sports car racer, aka Danny on the gas, a notorious lead foot known for his spectacular crashes. The writer knew he drove a Porsche 930 as everyday transportation, and asked about his technique for fast cornering. He replied, "I don't take corners fast in a 930".  Smart man.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

He should be imprisoned just for those shoes. No wonder he crashed it. Who the hell wears his mom's sandals to drive a supercar?

 

 

I noticed his moms shoes first, the car she picked the color for second. Bob 

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I guess other people would be jealous of him and that’s why he has followers but I can’t say I would want his life at all. Dressing and acting like a fool and coming from money, he probably has no talents and no real friends. Sure makes me even more thankful for where I am and who I am. 

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13 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

People GROSSLY under-estimate how quickly things happen in a seriously fast car. They look at NASCAR or F1 and figure they could do that with a little practice. No you couldn't. Few people can. That's why we're not all racing drivers.

 

I'm honestly shocked that they let 700 horsepower Dodges out the door of dealerships with just anybody at the wheel. When things start to go sideways in a big horsepower car, it's already too late by the time you notice, and cars like the one wrecked in this article are on an even more razor-thin edge. Once it gets away from you, there's just no way you're gathering it back in. Hell, Paul Walker was killed when a professional driver was at the wheel of a car like this (although the Porsche was known to be especially treacherous). I had an SCCA competition license for a dozen years and there are still cars I won't drive because they are just too treacherous.

 

To think a 17-year-old kid could handle such a thing should almost be criminal negligence. If someone had died, the father should have been prosecuted for letting it happen. I remember spinning my mom's 225 horsepower Mustang GT in 1987 when I was 17 and the roads were a little wet and cold. Scared the shiat out of me, but nothing happened other than I knocked the alignment out of kilter when I hit the curb. Important lesson learned. This article is about a car with three times as much power and 50% of the weight as that Mustang. You almost have to be superhuman to manage that thing at the edge.


Kid should be so thankful he's not dead that it should completely end his desire to be a public screw-up.

 

Same back in the 60's when cars got really fast, really quick. And those did not handle or stop anywhere as well as the cars today. And of course, only money required. I knew a lot of guys who wrecked fast cars. Most survived, a few did not.  I had those Good Angels watching over me several times when I did dumb stuff.  Drivers Ed was taught by teachers maybe 10 years older than we were with all that that implies. 

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I have never totaled a vehicle and have only been in one accident while not in a work vehicle ( I worked freeway construction in my early 20's and being on the freeway in a lane closure in Southern Calif means you're going to get hit sooner or later).

The new high horsepower cars brings up the same issue that came up years ago when motorcycles became very high horsepower and anyone with the money could buy a 200+hp motorcycle and ride away from the dealership.

But obviously the kid that crashed his Dad's expensive car is not on the road to being a responsible adult.

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A high-horsepower car in the hands of an incapable driver who thinks he is capable is a deadly weapon   Recall hearing about an area Dodge dealer who received his first Viper had to take it for a 'spin'  Getting up to speed was no problem, but the he missed the downshift by a couple gears, threw the car into a real spin, wiping out the front and rear both bouncing off the median guard rail.  All this on the dealership plates... 

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Most dangerous bike I ever saw was a 500cc Kawasaki triple. Watched a Darwin candidate stand one up in a parking lot, got air under the back tire, and when it landed it cracked the cases.

 

Good racing drivers are different from most. The best make the car look slow until you time them. A really well set up car can be driven at 11/10th but feels exactly like driving on ice. Best advice I ever got was "don't do anything sudden".

 

When really going fast time seems to slow down and have plenty of time to think about how to correct, whether to spin or try to correct. Hard part is not to outdrive the car, saw more crashes happen when an amateur tried to correct an issue and overcorrect into a wall.

 

Seen a few people spin at Indy, mostly in Lotii, just let it spin and drive out of it. Nice thing about a 360 is you usually just continue in the direction you were going unless try to correct but will lose velocity very quickly.

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4 hours ago, padgett said:

Most dangerous bike I ever saw was a 500cc Kawasaki triple. Watched a Darwin candidate stand one up in a parking lot, got air under the back tire, and when it landed it cracked the cases.

 

Good racing drivers are different from most. The best make the car look slow until you time them. A really well set up car can be driven at 11/10th but feels exactly like driving on ice. Best advice I ever got was "don't do anything sudden".

 

When really going fast time seems to slow down and have plenty of time to think about how to correct, whether to spin or try to correct. Hard part is not to outdrive the car, saw more crashes happen when an amateur tried to correct an issue and overcorrect into a wall.

 

Seen a few people spin at Indy, mostly in Lotii, just let it spin and drive out of it. Nice thing about a 360 is you usually just continue in the direction you were going unless try to correct but will lose velocity very quickly.


I grew up in a Kawasaki dealership, and learned my first mechanical skills there. I raced for the factory back in the early 80’s. I was able to purchase a 1971 H1 500 still in the crate out in the Santa Anna warehouse where it sat for 12 years in the corner. It’s the one with the buzz box electronic ignition. It’s still in the crate.....never assembled. Some day, I’ll take it to Pebble and uncrate it on the field, and assemble it during the show. Should make quite a spectacle........the big question is, will it run after sitting in a box for 55 years? With cable brakes, at least we won’t have to deal with hydraulic issues.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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"More money than brains" is a phrase that may apply here. But I am afraid that money and brains in many people seem to be one of those inverse relationships. Some of these really wealthy people? I think if they could barely scrape up enough money to buy a cup of coffee, they would still have more money than brains. Although maybe if they had no more than a couple dollars to their name? Maybe they would be willing to learn something?

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On 11/19/2020 at 7:28 PM, Mark Gregory said:

Ever smash or bang up the family car or worst wreck it ?

 

 

More than once when I was 17, ten feet tall, and stupid.  Now I'm older, shorter, and wiser (a little).

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