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What is correct reflective surface


Loren@65GS.com
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Loren, I appreciate your question as I have been interested in how and if a reflection can be quantified. We know the finish is chrome. Chrome finish can be achieved with ceramic thin coat film and polished. Of course chrome plating as we know by the tried, true, and very expensive. Some pro finishers have had luck with spray chrome. The spray chrome is the same silvering chemicals used to make mirrors, but for metal the procedure in applying the silvering chemicals are reversed and non forgiving. How a chrome reflection is measured I do not know.

Hopefully some of the info can steer you in the right direction. Thank you for posting.

Turbinator

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I don't think they were chrome. It was a bright reflective silver very similar to the chrome paint that is available which isn't as reflective as chrome.

I have used foil on a boattail in the past like Tom noted and it works great and really brightens up the lights at night but one side effect I noticed is when the sun hits the lens it reflects so much it can look like the light is on in some cases.

Edited by JZRIV (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Loren@65GS.com said:

Thanks for the replies.  I thought I read somewhere, that they were silvered. But I couldn't find that information again. I know chrome won't work from my days of model A and Hupmobile restoration.  

 

  Loren

Wow, I was really in right field. I misunderstood the question. I erred in thinking you were talking about the exterior of the housing.

Turbinator

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15 hours ago, jsgun said:

I can't find the link, but I saw sometime ago that testing showed gloss pure white is supposed to be the brightest 

I'm glad that you posted this. I had read that too but was afraid everyone would think I was nuts if I said anything.  Now I've got company.  What color is the housing inside your florescent light housing. 

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On 11/19/2020 at 2:18 PM, 60FlatTop said:

We found a gloss white or Titanium white to have the highest reflectivity using a light meter in building lighting systems when I was doing that work. If I was going to do mine I would probably paint them gloss white.

 That makes sense, as the silver/chrome would seem to favor the blue end of the spectrum; which wouldn't be optimal when passing the light through a red filter.  White would reflect all colors (wavelengths) equally.

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On 11/22/2020 at 11:53 AM, RivNut said:

Use a red bulb as well. That way you're reflecting red light.

 

When using LED tail light bulbs, what RivNut says is imperitive since LEDs emit a very narrow spectrum of light around the design color.  If using OEM-type incandescent bulbs (e.g., 1157), then use clear bulbs.  The spectral output of incandescent bulbs is naturally skewed toward the red end of the spectrum.

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  • 2 weeks later...

To 'resilver' the tail light housings in my '65 I just sprayed bright aluminum rattle can paint in there.  It did help brighten up the taillights once done, and has held up well.  I do like the idea of Titanium white though!

 

 

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