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1911 Flanders model 20 - Questions


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Hello, I just bought a 1911 Flanders 20 and its engine is missing its gasoline drip cups.  Can anyone with a Flanders 20 tell me what thread size they are, 1/8" pipe or 1/4" pipe?  I would suspect that the cups for an EMF 30 would be the same, but I'm not sure.  Thanks!

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Thanks for the reply!  I haven't received the car from the shipper yet, but from the pictures it appears my car has a replacment carburetor.  Does anyone have the correct carburetor for a 1911 Flanders 20?  I found the attached pictures of one from elsewhere in the forum.

carb_01.jpg

carb_02.jpg

carb_03.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Update - I found some priming cups from Restoration Supply that are closer to the originals, so I installed them.  If anyone with an early Studebaker needs a set of priming cups, my old ones are available.

 

 

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Knew an old timer whose first car was a Model T hot rod with high compression head, magneto ignition and Rayfield carburetor. Apparently the Rayfield was a popular improvement at the time, yours may qualify as a contemporary accessory or acceptable modification

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Curious,what type of fuel container do YOU use to fill the cups and do you carry that fuel filled container with you in the event the car sits to long and cools off too much requiring another fresh prime start?

 

Some of these old cars can stand cold a day or even 3 without priming ,some need it after 3 or 5 hours .

.

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I carry a little bit of gasoline in a 16oz plastic Pepsi bottle, along with a plastic syringe (turkey baster).  I fill the bottle about 1/3 full, and the squeeze about half of the remaining air out of it.  That allows room for lots of expansion with temperature change.  I have found that it really doesn’t need priming after the first run on hot days.

Edited by Akstraw (see edit history)
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Per Dykes Automotive encyclopedia, primer cups also work good to test the fuel/air mixture. A blue flame from the primer cup means the mixture is just right, red is too rich, yellow too lean. The beast in the video has a 453 cid engine. As mentioned previously by others we find that we only need the primer cups if its been sitting for a few days. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)
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Great video, thank you for posting it!  I'll have to try the flame test when I get my Flanders running.  It now has an original Flanders carburetor that has one spring loaded air bypass valve for mixture adjustment.

 

 

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On 4/3/2021 at 5:39 PM, Flivverking said:

Curious,what type of fuel container do YOU use to fill the cups and do you carry that fuel filled container with you 


From what I recall hearing, cars with the primers also had an “oil” can under the hood that was originally intended to hold a small amount of gas to prime with. It makes more sense than carting oil around which is a maintenance easier done in your home garage. It’s a rare day you suddenly need an Oiler in the middle of a drive, but priming gasoline could be needed.

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One of the things people need to remember is that 'gasoline' in the 1910s was not the good stuff we grew up with, and even further from the lousy stuff we have today. It didn't evaporate nearly as quickly, and could sit in an "oilcan" for days. It also did not vaporize in the carburetor nearly as well, which was the main reason that priming cups were often needed to get an engine started.

So yes. What most people today think was for oiling of the motor? Is often actually for the gasoline to prime the cylinders. Quite often, cars in the 1910s would have two such 'oilcans'. One for oiling, one for gasoline to prime with.

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  • Peter Gariepy changed the title to 1911 Flanders model 20 - Questions

The suburban/touring model (picture posted by Graham Man) is a larger model (at least body-wise?). Mark's new Flanders is model 20 roadster, an older restoration that looks pretty nice. He is redoing some of it, correcting several things that were either wrong or needed attention. He has a nice thread going on the model T forum about the car, and the losing of his mind. Well worth a look if you like the Flanders, anything Studebaker, or horseless carriages! Nice car.

 

https://mtfca.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=17099

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