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Anyone that has a wheel puller, please post a picture


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You shouldn't need a puller for wheels. 

 

What some mistakenly call a wheel puller is a drum puller. Franklin used a steel body puller that screws onto the threads of the drum hub, rather than use the lug bolts to pull on.  The drum puller uses the stronger threads of the hub and increases the hold by tightening a pinch bolt on the puller body to get a very tight grip on those threads. The lug bolt hole threads in the drum risk being striped out if you use a three legged type puller. Then you'll be helicoiling new threads in the drum. Don't ask how I know.

 

First picture is a Franklin drum puller. Second is their axle puller. They look similar but work opposite to each other. These and other Franklin shop tools are illustrated and listed in the back sections of the Series 14 parts book.

 

Paul

Brake drum puller on front drum.JPG

Axle shaft puller.JPG

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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BTW, one of the Club members was making drum pullers that uses the hub threads, and listing them for sale in the Club's website "Parts For Sale" section. 

 

Paul

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17 minutes ago, PFitz said:

BTW, one of the Club members was making drum pullers that uses the hub threads, and listing them for sale in the Club's website "Parts For Sale" section. 

 

Paul

 

Yes, I have one of them - they are made by Dick Gaskell's son and available through Dick Gaskell.

 

They do not have the pinch bolt to securely clamp them to the hub - they have a machined thread in them.

 

I haven't used mine yet.

 

Roger

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1 hour ago, theKiwi said:

 

Yes, I have one of them - they are made by Dick Gaskell's son and available through Dick Gaskell.

 

They do not have the pinch bolt to securely clamp them to the hub - they have a machined thread in them.

 

I haven't used mine yet.

 

Roger

Heating the hub with a torch to help it expand a bit makes a big difference in getting the drum off that axle taper.

 

One other trick I learned working in boatyards, is for getting cabin cruiser large bronze propellers off the same type long taper used on the propeller shafts. Use a mid-sized ball peen hammer to give a few good wacks along the length of the hub right above the hub keyway. Then heat the hub, install the puller, tighten the center screw against the end of the axle and give the head of the center screw a good wack. That has freed many a stuck drum that has had many decades to get stuck, and it does so without over stressing and damaging the hub puller or hub threads.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, hwellens said:

Based on the above, are these guys saying the 3 legged hub puller that thunderbolt47d has will not work?

If you know the drums have been off in recent history and the axle tapers were coated with oil, grease, or anti-seize (what I prefer), then yes you can use the three legged type pullers.

 

However, if the drums have been on there for who-knows-how-long, they can be extremely tough to break loose. There are only a few threads in the lug bolt holes of the brake drum. They are not really in the steel drum but the part of the cast iron hubs in behind the steel. And cast iron is brittle.  The threads are often already stressed from gorilla mechanics over-tightening the lug bolts. 

 

For anyone who does not know the last time the drums were off and still wants to use a three legged type puller rather than buy a hub thread type puller, I suggest they also order the 9/16-18 thread helicoil kit for the lug bolt holes to have on hand. They start at about $130.00.   

 

I have all three, guess what order I had to get them in.  😢

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, PFitz said:

If you know the drums have been off in recent history and the axle tapers were coated with oil, grease, or anti-seize (what I prefer), then yes you can use the three legged type pullers.

 

However, if the drums have been on there for who-knows-how-long, they can be extremely tough to break loose. There are only a few threads in the lug bolt holes of the brake drum. They are not really in the steel drum but the part of the cast iron hubs in behind the steel. And cast iron is brittle.  The threads are often already stressed from gorilla mechanics over-tightening the lug bolts. 

 

For anyone who does not know the last time the drums were off and still wants to use a three legged type puller rather than buy a hub thread type puller, I suggest they also order the 9/16-18 thread helicoil kit for the lug bolt holes to have on hand. They start at about $130.00.   

 

I have all three, guess what order I had to get them in.  😢

 

Paul

I am used to MOPAR drums from the 30's and always used a 3 legged drum puller with out hurting the drums for the last 40 years. Some drums have been on for many years. Sometimes you need a Iot of tension and hit the end with a hammer to get them off.  Guess the Franklin drums are made different.

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As Roger said, the large wrench on the right is the hub caps that screw onto the brake drum hubs, and the small open-end wrench on it's other end is the front wheel spindle nuts.

 

The air cleaner is 1930 and '31 Series 151/152 and early 153.

 

One of those sockets should fit the spark plugs and have a hole through the side to fit a screw driver through to act as a wrench lever handle.

 

The two pins clipped onto the middle of the lug wrench are wheel pilots. Using the square socket deeper inside the socket end of the lug wrench, you screw them in lug bolt holes and it makes it easier when trying to take  off or put a wheel back on. Nice find because they are often missing. 

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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