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Hobbyists who take apart a nice car then try and sell it in pieces years later ? ?


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By the way, unless exceptional (and I mean TRULY TRULY EXCEPTIONAL) the day for over 100K project cars has sailed (perhaps $99,999.99 works, but ...). And, with the volume of projects cars coming on the market - let's just say I worked very hard at it to bail out over the past 8 weeks while the bailing out was good and stuff was at its near max value. There is now only one X left in the storage building - we will see where that goes over time.  I am still happy to pick up projects (and always need one + to keep me engaged), but going to be much more choosy forthcoming. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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On 11/16/2020 at 3:33 PM, Ed Luddy said:

I went to look at this on Saturday. A 1958 Chevrolet shortbox pickup. It has a brand new box, fenders, lots of chrome trim, etc. I said no for many reasons but kept thinking of it all weekend and today. Called owner back, and he sold it yesterday. Huge relief!

 

 

Yes, I was very relieved when the '64 Studebaker pickup I bid on recently went to someone else. That feeling of relief was a sign that I never should've bid on it.

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9 minutes ago, JamesR said:

 

Yes, I was very relieved when the '64 Studebaker pickup I bid on recently went to someone else. That feeling of relief was a sign that I never should've bid on it.

 

Ah yes.  Sport Bidding.  You win when you lose.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I don't think I really want to know what the answer is for this. But any idea what amount the seller was willing to take? The Kijiji page says sold for $1234. However, that is usually one of the common fake prices used in internet ads.

So many unknowns yet. Location of everything? Actual current condition? Much of it lost by now? But that is a car I could fall in love with! Provided condition and etc is acceptable. I would dislike thinking it could be had so cheap, IF it is that decent.

I still do not need any more projects. However I could really like that car.

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Another stalled project I was asked to buy. Typical story I have already related. The "restorer" purchased car from original owner. (1918 Buick E-45 Touring.) Take all apart. Have the car part of the way completed.

109162704_159795418988201_7948733172103040436_n.thumb.jpg.75433c07cc7a27d88737ea0926a61dbf.jpg.302fa9a43db0405ed511f70717eda2a1.jpg 109160830_159795402321536_5456241598210535183_n.thumb.jpg.a2370141f9be4322470027ceb477ad3c.jpg.782a0b52979c0989fcfac01ae1c4aee1.jpg

Loose interest and start another project. That car a 1914 B-38 Buick Coupe. Repeated attempts to see the cars when the owner was still alive were blocked. He was a BCA member.

ad9779.jpg.ad97d635c24fd02b2f7735e0a2848291.jpg

(only 50 produced)  Above.. What the rare coupe should look like. It was bought from the original owners estate for big money at the time over 40 years ago I believe for $7,500. When I first contacted the owner I simply wanted to document the maybe only existing coupe.

 The family account was that the car was in very nice complete original condition. Same story...Tear it all apart and spread those components over several buildings. Reality and illness set in and the years pass...The owner passes and the spouse follows soon after. The children who had no interest in dad's cars now want over the top dollar. No documentation on what was done to either car was kept.

 After several sale attempts the family have contacted me again and sending several conflicting statements as to selling both cars as a package. CHEAP! I sent my email as the seller said he would send me photos of the 1914s distributed parts. I said I could put it on the forum to get a better audience. After a week no photos as of yet. Oh, and he indicated that the 1918 was already sold and there was much interest at the now low price of $7,500. Then it was not sold yet....the buyer backed out?? Why? In finishing up our last conversation he passed a remark that they could never find the titles to the cars! No problem he says......

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1 hour ago, dibarlaw said:

Another stalled project I was asked to buy. Typical story I have already related. The "restorer" purchased car from original owner. (1918 Buick E-45 Touring.) Take all apart. Have the car part of the way completed.

109162704_159795418988201_7948733172103040436_n.thumb.jpg.75433c07cc7a27d88737ea0926a61dbf.jpg.302fa9a43db0405ed511f70717eda2a1.jpg 109160830_159795402321536_5456241598210535183_n.thumb.jpg.a2370141f9be4322470027ceb477ad3c.jpg.782a0b52979c0989fcfac01ae1c4aee1.jpg

Loose interest and start another project. That car a 1914 B-38 Buick Coupe. Repeated attempts to see the cars when the owner was still alive were blocked. He was a BCA member.

ad9779.jpg.ad97d635c24fd02b2f7735e0a2848291.jpg

(only 50 produced)  Above.. What the rare coupe should look like. It was bought from the original owners estate for big money at the time over 40 years ago I believe for $7,500. When I first contacted the owner I simply wanted to document the maybe only existing coupe.

 The family account was that the car was in very nice complete original condition. Same story...Tear it all apart and spread those components over several buildings. Reality and illness set in and the years pass...The owner passes and the spouse follows soon after. The children who had no interest in dad's cars now want over the top dollar. No documentation on what was done to either car was kept.

 After several sale attempts the family have contacted me again and sending several conflicting statements as to selling both cars as a package. CHEAP! I sent my email as the seller said he would send me photos of the 1914s distributed parts. I said I could put it on the forum to get a better audience. After a week no photos as of yet. Oh, and he indicated that the 1918 was already sold and there was much interest at the now low price of $7,500. Then it was not sold yet....the buyer backed out?? Why? In finishing up our last conversation he passed a remark that they could never find the titles to the cars! No problem he says......

Well, as sad as reality is, but like I mentioned before and while not all are old Buicks, there are millions of these types of stories of unfinished (unrealistic ?) dreams and many more created around the world one daily bases. Vast majority will end up as scrap metal or worse. 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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On 11/13/2020 at 3:27 PM, trimacar said:

Gee, I’d think you guys would be more appreciative, the seller usually says something like “hard part is done, I’ve taken it apart for you!”.......

 

I agree. Nothing burns me up more than seeing a pile of parts for sale for astronomical $$ and the seller writes: "all the hard work is done", or "just drop in an engine and go"...

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6 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Add me to the list of people that would love to have that 1914 Buick Coupe! What state is it in? Bob 

Bob:

 Be assured I will love to see the car go to a loving Buick home. IF IT TRULY EXISTS! It ain't so unless we see pictures! If I do not hear back from him soon I will try to give him a nudge.

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I know a elderly gentleman here in town with a 1929 Whippet.  He told me he bought it from a friends widow, totally dis-assembled in the basement.

When he went to look, there were two dis-assembled cars in the basement.

Turned our the other one was a 1929 Chevrolet.  He got both for the price of the Whippet, took it all home, sorted it out an sold the

Chevy project to fund the Whippet restoration.  Only problem is he never takes it out of the garage, although it looks great.  I guess his widow will have to deal with it next.

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There used to be a weekly car show run by some great people a couple of miles from my house. Would take a different car every week. Really miss that & hard to get motivated these days.

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I heard of a '26 Model T Ford project about 20 years ago. "Just put in that spare engine you have laying around and you'll be driving it in no time" were the seller's parting words. 7 years later I had a AGNS winner in my garage.  The fun part of the process was assembling the kit. Now I have another "kit car for a song" and I plan to do it all over again.  To me its much more about saving the good cars than anything else. I confess, I am still looking for that abandoned, unwanted, disassembled Duesenberg project that seems so elusive!

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Sometimes having no idea what you’re getting into is the best way to go.  My first project was a 1949 Ford F-1 that my dad owned briefly and then sold.  After many years of abuse that owner then gave it back to me.  I was 12 years old and couldn’t have been happier.  
 

6ECA90F9-6D9B-4263-A27E-A2F8EF0320D7.thumb.jpeg.f2f35df36798c98351621d09c9a5f0ed.jpeg
 

Well, I’d never again want to take one that far gone and make something of it, it took many years and more money than I care to think but it made for a nice truck with a good story.

 

81862A5D-FB57-43DB-BF3B-41622C7E6C07.thumb.jpeg.23ad0f00c49b849f2ba9aab769c4a89d.jpeg

 

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Here is a new example that just showed up in the For Sale section. It is one thing when the car is torn down and it sits for some time. But when it has been torn down and then transported several other times loosing parts along the way. Then major assemblies ending up in 2 different locations.

1929 Oakland Phaeton - For Sale

By Norm Hutton, 1 hour ago    
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/14/2020 at 12:59 PM, dibarlaw said:

Another stalled project I was asked to buy. Typical story I have already related. The "restorer" purchased car from original owner. (1918 Buick E-45 Touring.) Take all apart. Have the car part of the way completed.

109162704_159795418988201_7948733172103040436_n.thumb.jpg.75433c07cc7a27d88737ea0926a61dbf.jpg.302fa9a43db0405ed511f70717eda2a1.jpg 109160830_159795402321536_5456241598210535183_n.thumb.jpg.a2370141f9be4322470027ceb477ad3c.jpg.782a0b52979c0989fcfac01ae1c4aee1.jpg

Loose interest and start another project. That car a 1914 B-38 Buick Coupe. Repeated attempts to see the cars when the owner was still alive were blocked. He was a BCA member.

ad9779.jpg.ad97d635c24fd02b2f7735e0a2848291.jpg

(only 50 produced)  Above.. What the rare coupe should look like. It was bought from the original owners estate for big money at the time over 40 years ago I believe for $7,500. When I first contacted the owner I simply wanted to document the maybe only existing coupe.

 The family account was that the car was in very nice complete original condition. Same story...Tear it all apart and spread those components over several buildings. Reality and illness set in and the years pass...The owner passes and the spouse follows soon after. The children who had no interest in dad's cars now want over the top dollar. No documentation on what was done to either car was kept.

 After several sale attempts the family have contacted me again and sending several conflicting statements as to selling both cars as a package. CHEAP! I sent my email as the seller said he would send me photos of the 1914s distributed parts. I said I could put it on the forum to get a better audience. After a week no photos as of yet. Oh, and he indicated that the 1918 was already sold and there was much interest at the now low price of $7,500. Then it was not sold yet....the buyer backed out?? Why? In finishing up our last conversation he passed a remark that they could never find the titles to the cars! No problem he says......

Larry,

 

I can share a little more information on this collection. Because I bought the 1914. The 1914 was not a B-38 but a B-24 Roadster and it was partially dismantled. Luckily the gentleman who dismantled the vehicles was pretty good labeling which Buick the parts belonged. It appears as if the B-24 is 99-98% complete and there are some notes as to what the previous guy had done prior in regards to the body and wiring. The 1918 was in a state of disassembly as well and would need a complete re-restoration (cracked paint, hole in the top, missing running boards, etc) form my brief look at it. You are correct that there are not titles, which has me a little concerned. They had to have the cars & parts out of the garage by today before an auction company came in and took everything left, so I boxed up everything for the 1914 into my trailer and took it with me before they made things worse by relocating the cars and parts. I've attached some pictures of the 1914.  

IMG_2821.JPG

IMG_2832.jpg

IMG_2833.jpg

IMG_2835.jpg

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On 12/18/2020 at 10:38 AM, dibarlaw said:

Here is a new example that just showed up in the For Sale section. It is one thing when the car is torn down and it sits for some time. But when it has been torn down and then transported several other times loosing parts along the way. Then major assemblies ending up in 2 different locations.

1929 Oakland Phaeton - For Sale

By Norm Hutton, 1 hour ago    

 

 

No photos=no sale

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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8 hours ago, Kblake said:

Larry,

 

I can share a little more information on this collection. Because I bought the 1914. The 1914 was not a B-38 but a B-24 Roadster and it was partially dismantled. Luckily the gentleman who dismantled the vehicles was pretty good labeling which Buick the parts belonged. It appears as if the B-24 is 99-98% complete and there are some notes as to what the previous guy had done prior in regards to the body and wiring. The 1918 was in a state of disassembly as well and would need a complete re-restoration (cracked paint, hole in the top, missing running boards, etc) form my brief look at it. You are correct that there are not titles, which has me a little concerned. They had to have the cars & parts out of the garage by today before an auction company came in and took everything left, so I boxed up everything for the 1914 into my trailer and took it with me before they made things worse by relocating the cars and parts. I've attached some pictures of the 1914.  

IMG_2821.JPG

IMG_2832.jpg

IMG_2833.jpg

IMG_2835.jpg

Kyle:

 I am so glad that you acquired the car! It was not until Jeff sent me the 30 photos of the 1918 that I spied what the car really was, a B24 roadster. image.png.e30ae2f8a59494918b14fb4d41b55de5.png

I had been chasing this will-o-the wisp "coupe" since 2014 when the owners brother told me about the rare Buick "coupe". Even the owner Andy referred to it as a coupe! It was stated in his profile in the 2011 BCA Roster that his cars were the 1918- E45 and 1914-B24. I pressed him on the point and he still called it a rare coupe! That was when I visited him at his home to see the cars on the way back home from the 2015 BCA nationals!  He said he could not get the garage doors open so I never did get to see them. Again, Jeff was to send me photos of the 1914 to my email. That was Dec 14th. After several calls he got back to me on Monday with the word that the 1914 had been sold to a fellow in Cumberland. I asked for your contact information and he would not agree. So, I am thrilled that you filled us in on the rest of the story. I am looking forward to the continuation of your journey with this project. I am at your disposal for any help you may need. I am only a little less than 2-hrs away.

 

 

Edited by dibarlaw
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51 minutes ago, dibarlaw said:

Kyle:

 I am so glad that you acquired the car! It was not until Jeff sent me the 30 photos of the 1918 that I spied what the car really was, a B24 roadster. image.png.e30ae2f8a59494918b14fb4d41b55de5.png

I had been chasing this will-o-the wisp "coupe" since 2014 when the owners brother told me about the rare Buick "coupe". Even the owner Andy referred to it as a coupe! It was stated in his profile in the 2011 BCA Roster that his cars were the 1918- E45 and 1914-B24. I pressed him on the point and he still called it a rare coupe! That was when I visited him at his home to see the cars on the way back home from the 2015 BCA nationals!  He said he could not get the garage doors open so I never did get to see them. Again, Jeff was to send me photos of the 1914 to my email. That was Dec 14th. After several calls he got back to me on Monday with the word that the 1914 had been sold to a fellow in Cumberland. I asked for your contact information and he would not agree. So, I am thrilled that you filled us in on the rest of the story. I am looking forward to the continuation of your journey with this project. I am at your disposal for any help you may need. I am only a little less than 2-hrs away.

 

 

Larry,


Thanks!! I've never taken on someones already started project and especially not a project that there was no one alive to help me understand what has already been done. Currently I'm just sorting through the parts to see what all is here and what can possibly be missing. I've found some pictures of the car when it was apparently painted white. Appears as if Andy didn't do too much other than remove the body from the frame, primer the body, and replace the top & seat (with incorrect material).  Found also in the paperwork is an invoice from 1989 so I'd guess Andy had this vehicle for some time before his passing. I've already ordered some Buick Heritage books to help me compare what I have to the Buick illustrations. Your help will be very much welcome and you can anticipate my registration into the BCA Mason Dixon Chapter! 

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Looking forward to it Kyle.

 Thanks for the added photos. It looks like Andy bought a degraded previous 1950s restoration.

 I know in some of the BCA Bugles there is an article about an original 1914-B24. I will look it up.

PM sent with my other contact info.

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Kyle:

 I spoke to the brother of the former owner on Saturday. When I told him that the 1914 had been sold he again refered to it as a coupe. I explained again the fact that it is a roadster. During our discussion he also went on that the car was touted to be a CUSTOM MADE vehicle for a small statured female doctor. Repeating the detail that her initials were painted on the doors. From the photos that you have shared I saw nothing to lead anyone to believe there was any custom work done. Possibly the painted initials?

 In the scanned photos you have I see a 1992? Glidden tour card on the wall. Could possibly have been a participant? Lead to a previous owner?

 A 1913 Buick model 31 I negotiated on from Belle Vernon PA. Previous relative owner was from Michigan.

DSCF4707.thumb.JPG.4239133f3c89c12f9431bf94f342abe3.JPG  DSCF4705.thumb.JPG.f21192563ecf3e0ce38445de293f4a38.JPG

It had many badges including the 1956 Glidden. Recently someone posted home movies from the event and there was the car!

 Many of us love to find the back story on our cars. Unfortunatly with my 3 Buicks there was very little to go on to reach back to former owners.

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On 11/16/2020 at 7:15 AM, 58L-Y8 said:

After reading these tales, maybe car collectors should adopt these to adages:

First: "Do no harm."

Second: "Leave well enough alone."

Third: "Don't take actions that might leave a disassembled mess for your widow."

Fourth: "Leave written, explicit instructions for the dispersal of each car."

Fifth: "Only one car at a time disassembled for restoration."

 

Two decades ago, I visited a widow whose husband's collection was in the basement of a large, small-town hardware store building.  Primary interest was a 1940 Packard 120 convertible sedan and a 1929 Hupmobile Eight sedan among the eight cars.    Only one, a 1960 Thunderbird was in drivable condition, all the others were in various states disassembly and partial restoration.  Parts were stashed here, there and everywhere, all mixed together.   Of course, before the husband passed on, he had told her unrealistic values for all of them.  I did later hear the two cars I was interested in eventually were sold and restored but the others, that's anyone's guess.

 

That is why my 60 Pontiac is still fully assembled and drivable.  My 57 is in a million pieces (body / chassis is actually in another state getting the roof /floors replaced),  I realized that multiple projects is not a wise decision for me.  Once my 57 is done, I will start work on the Pontiac.  Only projects I do on the Pontiac now are ones I can complete in no more than 6-8 hours start to finish (new brakes, transmission seals, etc)

 

Parting out cars, especially rare and expensive cars can be profitable.  That's why we have junkyards now.  It hurts to see it happen, but from a purely financial view it can make sense.  

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Larry,

 

I've seen nothing to make me believe that it was customized at all. And in the pictures prior to dismantle and primer was applied I do see a single initial on the door, perhaps that was her. The son in-law did say that Andy bought the car off a doctor that lived down the same street Andy lived on, but didn't mention the doctor was a female or that it was customized. I too love to find the provenance of the cars when possible. 

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