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Hobbyists who take apart a nice car then try and sell it in pieces years later ? ?


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You can see another Corvette in the garage in some shots (1962?) so my guess is he had two cars and put one together using all the parts he needed and then cobbled together this frame and is selling it.

No drive shaft in the frame for sale but the exhaust looks newish with ram's horn manifolds.

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This is the latest one I was involved in. 1932 Buick.

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 Supposed rebuilt engine. Spare parts etc. Some new repro stuff.  My friend who was interested was told that it had a nice original interior. (1960s gray vinyl including the headliner!)The owner took several strokes and everything sat for nearly 15 years. The family was asking $22,000. Because that is what the owner said it was worth before he tore it apart.

 So sad.

 When I bought my 1937 Buick in 1987 and drove it home from Altoona PA. I also had plans.... After pulling the rear axle to replace the clutch and none could be found things stalled.... for 25years.

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After we got things back together and got her back on the road we have had much enjoyment. I was reluctant to do any major disassembly again. Now knowing my own skillset limitations. I have done minor jobs to bring things up a notch keep things drivable and looking a bit better.

 This lesson has guided me in the work on my other 2 Buicks. I fix them... Drive them....repeat.DSCF6306.thumb.JPG.37aae372b7b4e5881b36dc0507d029bc.JPG    thumbnail_IMG_0111.jpg.7ed18389b4aa32c2a9b8ee36dcd16b7a.jpg

   I stopped with painting at the cowl. I would still like to redo the top and paint the rest of the car the correct Brewster green. 

 During the needed engine rebuild I did consider on doing a body off restoration. That skillset again... I did what I could do working from the front back. One area at a time has worked for me so far so I did not have the car off the road for more than several weeks. The year it took to get things back together I bought another 1925 Buick Master Touring that came up near me. While the engine was being rebuilt in the first 1925 we at least had this other car to have fun with. After I got things running and driving safely with this car the timing gear went out.  I refused to do anything on this car until the engine was back in the other car.  Once the 1925 Standard was back together I replaced that timing gear.

Latest project on the Master is the water pump. But everything is with the car and once I rebuild the spare pump all I will do swap it out.DSCF5843.thumb.JPG.701f733dc00b6e3c165ed7afa917e240.JPG

I keep in the back of my mind... what if I would kick off ? At least the wife has complete cars to deal with.

 

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17 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

This guy took it apart and lost the body. Now he has just the chassis and some parts left to sell.

https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/cto/d/peoria-1961-corvette-chassis/7217205756.html

1

 

Very sad. OTOH, that could make one thrilling go kart! You have much more interesting Craigslist ads in AZ than we do around here.

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Last spring I found these two cars which were disassembled back in the early 90’s by the same person. He partly restored the 1919 T Touring. He restored the chassis on the 1928 A Phaeton but the rest is unrestored. He stopped work in 2001 and they sat ever since. He advertised the 1919 T for “parts”. I bought the 1919 to reassemble it this winter and will go back next spring and buy the Model A to restore during the next few winters. YES, the Model A is parked in front of the Model T, under all those cardboard boxes!

B614FE22-5D66-4D6F-814E-D0BBD4A53E0E.jpeg

Edited by Jeff Perkins / Mn (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

I bet the body went on to a resto mod with a modern chassis. I've seen it several times and more than once with what looked like it might have been a very nice car. 

A guy who lives a couple of blocks from me is doing the same thing with a complete, unmolested '64 Vette convertible.  He offered to sell me the frame/chassis as my '63 coupe has frame rust.  I declined as it would screw up my matching numbers car.

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Friend of mine is a dealer in collector cars.  Some years ago he sold a '53 Cadillac locally to a fellow who took it apart to restore it.  Several years later the fellow realized he would never get it back together and sold it back to my friend, obviously for less than he paid for it.  My friend assembled it and put it on his showroom floor. Fellow who bought it the first time saw it in the showroom and regretted selling it.  He bought it and took it apart for a second time.  Several more years passed and he realized yet again that he would never get it finished and sold it back to my friend a second time for less than he paid for it.  My friend assembled it, this time doing a "driver" restoration. Guess what. The fellow who had bought it twice and sold it back to my friend twice saw it on the showroom floor and bought it a third time, this time promising not to take it apart.  Sounds like a made up story but I swear it's true.

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After reading these tales, maybe car collectors should adopt these to adages:

First: "Do no harm."

Second: "Leave well enough alone."

Third: "Don't take actions that might leave a disassembled mess for your widow."

Fourth: "Leave written, explicit instructions for the dispersal of each car."

Fifth: "Only one car at a time disassembled for restoration."

 

Two decades ago, I visited a widow whose husband's collection was in the basement of a large, small-town hardware store building.  Primary interest was a 1940 Packard 120 convertible sedan and a 1929 Hupmobile Eight sedan among the eight cars.    Only one, a 1960 Thunderbird was in drivable condition, all the others were in various states disassembly and partial restoration.  Parts were stashed here, there and everywhere, all mixed together.   Of course, before the husband passed on, he had told her unrealistic values for all of them.  I did later hear the two cars I was interested in eventually were sold and restored but the others, that's anyone's guess.

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13 hours ago, Jeff Perkins / Mn said:

Last spring I found these two cars which were disassembled back in the early 90’s by the same person. He partly restored the 1919 T Touring. He restored the chassis on the 1928 A Phaeton but the rest is unrestored. He stopped work in 2001 and they sat ever since. He advertised the 1919 T for “parts”. I bought the 1919 to reassemble it this winter and will go back next spring and buy the Model A to restore during the next few winters. YES, the Model A is parked in front of the Model T, under all those cardboard boxes!

B614FE22-5D66-4D6F-814E-D0BBD4A53E0E.jpeg

Jeff:

At least on the T and the A there is parts support. Best of luck on the restoration of the cars!

They had to remove (2-3) 14 yard dumpsters of stuff before uncovering the 32 Buick. Also 2 seized, big series 1931 and 1932 engines on cut off chassis outside under tarps. What is included with the Buick they could only guess. The original owner passed last year. The property is sold and must be vacated by March.

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Note the hanging ceiling insulation that was soaked from the leaking roof.

 

 

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I went to look at this on Saturday. A 1958 Chevrolet shortbox pickup. It has a brand new box, fenders, lots of chrome trim, etc. I said no for many reasons but kept thinking of it all weekend and today. Called owner back, and he sold it yesterday. Huge relief!

crznov 072.jpg

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9 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

After reading these tales, maybe car collectors should adopt these to adages:

First: "Do no harm."

Second: "Leave well enough alone."

Third: "Don't take actions that might leave a disassembled mess for your widow."

Fourth: "Leave written, explicit instructions for the dispersal of each car."

Fifth: "Only one car at a time disassembled for restoration."

 

Two decades ago, I visited a widow whose husband's collection was in the basement of a large, small-town hardware store building.  Primary interest was a 1940 Packard 120 convertible sedan and a 1929 Hupmobile Eight sedan among the eight cars.    Only one, a 1960 Thunderbird was in drivable condition, all the others were in various states disassembly and partial restoration.  Parts were stashed here, there and everywhere, all mixed together.   Of course, before the husband passed on, he had told her unrealistic values for all of them.  I did later hear the two cars I was interested in eventually were sold and restored but the others, that's anyone's guess.

I really like the fifth rule, I've always abided by it through the years and everything got finished. I like the second adage too. 

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Here is one I tried to buy about 10 years ago. Grandpa was going to restore it someday. It had been sitting in his garage since 1953. Well, Grandpa passed a couple of years ago and Grandma gave it to a grandson. The next thing you know it was being parted out, keeping only the body for himself for a hot rod. Oh, well.....

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Ok, so my situation is different but similar. I have always bought basket cases because they were affordable. The problem is: nobody tells you this stuff; you get into these situations naively. I bought one car and as I came close to getting it put back together, I found another car I had been wanting so I bought it and sold the other. Then, the guy never came to get the car. In the process I learned of parts of a car close to me that was made in my state at the turn of the century. Of course, I had to attempt to bring it back to life (1900car.weebly.com). Then some of my help passed on to that great junkyard in the sky and life happened to me. I am living in a completely different world today than I was 15 years ago. It takes a lot more than I realized to maintain a fleet of cars and I became caretaker of another piece of property. Now its all too much. I love my cars. I don't want to sell any of them. I have hope that something will change. I'm stuck.

 

I dare say nobody goes into a project thinking I'll never be able to finish it. Experience is a great teacher but the problem is you don't have it until you go through it. People need hopes and dreams, even if they can't fulfill them.

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18 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

You need a mission.

 

With all due respect, but what does this kind of circus performance has to do with umpteen million unfinished/unrealistic projects ?

I can probably go to any local Home Depot parking lot and enlist a group of day laborers to accomplish any number of this type of "tasks" with half a day's worth of training, even with my limited language skills.

Now if the guys in the video would've actually taken a decades old, broken down, worn out, neglected field find Jeep and rebuilt every bit of it to running/driving/fully working condition in timely manner "on the field" environment, you could color me impressed. 

 

 

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I have debated with myself whether to comment here or not. However, I have found myself in a boat very similar to AHa's. I am both the best and the worst of this. My dad, on the other hand, while in so many ways a wonderful and brilliantly intelligent person, had absolutely NO concept of time. As long as I can remember, he wanted to restore an antique automobile, take it to shows and drive it lots of places. When I was fifteen, he bought the 1927 Paige that was supposed to be the great family project. We were all going to work on it and restore it for all of us to enjoy. Like so many other people, we got it taken apart, but almost nothing was actually restored. Within a month, he had buried the car in the garage under hundreds of boxes and odds and ends that needed to sit somewhere. That was how he was. Always "going" to do something. When he died, he left such a huge mess that I had to give away about half of his cars to an Old General Motors wrecking yard just to get them gone before the landlord was going to charge me for storage. The 1964 Cadillac that was a beautiful low mileage original car thirty years earlier was just a rusted out hulk. One old truck I tried to keep for a couple years, and I actually got it running. But life got in the way and later I gave it away to a neighbor. Too many other things to go into. 

The Paige? It became mine a few years before he died. I did a lot of work on it, but not nearly enough. It looks a lot better, but still needs major restoration work. After he had buried it in the garage? I bought a 1929 Reo Flying Cloud coupe which I did some work on, and drove for several years. I eventually sold it to buy a 1925 Studebaker (just enough earlier that I liked it better) that was apart in mid restoration (the previous owner had found a car he really wanted!). I finished the car, and used it for a few years (until I had to sell it to pay hospital bills).

In addition to the '25 Studebaker and the Reo, I restored a 1916 Model T center-door sedan that had been taken apart for restoration and passed around a half dozen collectors before I got it. I also restored a Ford TT truck from a basket case, and five different model T speedster/racer cars from different acquired piles of remains of an original era speedster. 

Nearly all the cars I have had running? Were sold to support family. At an age I should be enjoying the cars I have collected? I am trying to find time to work on piles of junk in the hopes of driving on tours again. Yeah, life gets in the way. 

Along the way, I picked up a few more piles that used to be a car. I have about five piles of car that I still hope to restore. I am sure I won't live long enough to get them all done. But two or three more that I could keep and enjoy would be wonderful!

 

 

The 1916 T center-door sedan I restored about thirty years ago.

 

 

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Edited by wayne sheldon
spotted a typo :( (see edit history)
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On 11/14/2020 at 8:06 PM, padgett said:

Reminds me of the old saying "if you have to ask, you can't afford it."

Years ago, Dad and I went into the Williams Rolls Royce to look at a New Turbo Bentley - the "hostess" asked if she could help and dad asked the cost of the black one in the window.  She did the "have to ask thing."  Dad asked her is she owned a home and she said yes.  He asked if she asked it's price and she said yes.  He then replied it was a shame she could not afford her home. She took offense.  We then left and drove to Herman Albers RR in Zionsville and it was their lucky day. 

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On 11/16/2020 at 11:22 AM, dibarlaw said:

Jeff:

At least on the T and the A there is parts support. Best of luck on the restoration of the cars!

They had to remove (2-3) 14 yard dumpsters of stuff before uncovering the 32 Buick. Also 2 seized, big series 1931 and 1932 engines on cut off chassis outside under tarps. What is included with the Buick they could only guess. The original owner passed last year. The property is sold and must be vacated by March.

1181329218_DSCF8449(1024x768).thumb.jpg.07b64bf3e9cac631be5b615f912f67c0.jpg

Note the hanging ceiling insulation that was soaked from the leaking roof.

 

 

You could probably go like 14K to 16K or so comfortably if the Coach/brougham has anywhere close to a usable interior (if a trainwreck interior then less). A rebuilt engine is still never cheap so that gives you some more wiggle roam perhaps.

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All but one of my cars could drive to NYC tomorrow. The other would take a couple of days (need to flush the fuel tank & replace the fuel pump). Some need a thing or two  but nothing that prevents driving (why I have so many garage doors).

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3 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

You could probably go like 14K to 16K or so comfortably if the Coach/brougham has anywhere close to a usable interior (if a trainwreck interior then less). A rebuilt engine is still never cheap so that gives you some more wiggle roam perhaps.

John:

 The model 96 is identified as a Victoria Coupe.  There appears to be 10 in the BCAs current 2020 roster. It was advertised in the "Buick Bugle" as a 1932 Doctors coupe without a series designation.  The train wreck interior....That was one of the shocks when we got to see the car since the contact guy said it had a nice original interior.

574397085_DSCF8461(1024x768).thumb.jpg.ad09b3ef0b8ccfda6f666d1ed2dbc7a2.jpg 

All interior details were removed.

211347104_DSCF8462(1024x768).thumb.jpg.eda7e5a0f7f44429339ef71efb16744f.jpg 

He tore apart the dash and the gages.534056960_DSCF8463(1024x768).thumb.jpg.063ac2798c2ce0b35a1716646be0ce01.jpg 

Stained gray vinyl, even the headliner.

 As to the rebuilt engine. It has sat not being started or turned over without the manifolds being installed for at least 15 years.1146240248_DSCF8455(1024x768).thumb.jpg.b344c8784214acdfe016d210cd1132f1.jpg

 

 

Edited by dibarlaw
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Remember when we believed that all cars needed to be restored, well I do. Then reality sank in, at least for some of us. We were getting too old to restore another one, the cost of everything went through the roof, while the car values failed to keep pace. Reality was that the hobby was changing, people who recognized what was happening changed course.

 

Time is the one variable that we have a hard time accounting for. I know of very few people who are actively restoring anything. Those who hadn't figured it out, or who had already committed to a project got left holding the bag.

 

It's been an interesting ride. I have one worthwhile project left, but if I don't get it done someone will. 

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The hobby peaked in the 1970's for the home restorer, once restored cars reached $100,000. it was a race to were values are today. I'm sure there are still great cars out there, stalled restorations that will see the light and road some day, many have been apart for twice as long as they were originally together. 

 

Bob 

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There was a nice driving 1938 Packard full limo in Vegas that the drive train was pulled out and sold to put in a "reliable" LS motor and 700R transmission.

The car has now been sitting for a year and a half, no engine or tranny with the hood and dash in the back. The front clip was placed back on without a radiator.

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Here is a 12 T I came across by accident when I was approached by a fellow in his 90s when leaving a parking lot. We stopped for lunch in PA on our way home from the 2016 Sentimental Tour and got sidetracked to the fellows basement to look a 4 cars he put away in 1942 before leaving for WW2. I made him an offer that he rejected as he wanted to sell them seeing his family had no interest in them. I told a friend about them and he also could not strike a deal with the fellow who wanted 2X the value. This pass spring a family member contacted my friend as the fellow had passed and bought 2 of the cars for the price of what I offered for one he bought. Now the cars are still sitting in the basement  seeing the boarder is still closed to essential traffic only.

Just little clutter and a few cobwebs underneath.    

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Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, padgett said:

Dodge posted by Hudsy looks like a pile of parts and "some assembly required". Is that clear enough ? Am used to having students who know how to complete an idea.

 

Excuse me Mr Peterson, but you still have not explained what an "assembly kit" is that you referred too for a 1928 Dodge Brothers, or where one would look for one. I am just curious, being you said it so there is no need for your condescending answer. Good teachers embrace questions and do not avoid an answering them

 

FYI I am not your student.

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1 hour ago, Fossil said:

I'm pretty sure this is the kit he's referring to. All that's missing is the box. 

And the instructions.

 

Also guessing there are a number of either missing or damaged parts that are missing from the nonexistent box.

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On 11/23/2020 at 10:12 PM, dibarlaw said:

John:

 The model 96 is identified as a Victoria Coupe.  There appears to be 10 in the BCAs current 2020 roster. It was advertised in the "Buick Bugle" as a 1932 Doctors coupe without a series designation.  The train wreck interior....That was one of the shocks when we got to see the car since the contact guy said it had a nice original interior.

574397085_DSCF8461(1024x768).thumb.jpg.ad09b3ef0b8ccfda6f666d1ed2dbc7a2.jpg 

All interior details were removed.

211347104_DSCF8462(1024x768).thumb.jpg.eda7e5a0f7f44429339ef71efb16744f.jpg 

He tore apart the dash and the gages.534056960_DSCF8463(1024x768).thumb.jpg.063ac2798c2ce0b35a1716646be0ce01.jpg 

Stained gray vinyl, even the headliner.

 As to the rebuilt engine. It has sat not being started or turned over without the manifolds being installed for at least 15 years.1146240248_DSCF8455(1024x768).thumb.jpg.b344c8784214acdfe016d210cd1132f1.jpg

 

 

well, at least the interior is just amateur vinyl and not a moth hotel (all be it may have been a moth hotel once in time). Yes, I recognized it as the large Buick - poke around for wood rot (32 is a rough year for wood rot as they were trying new stuff lowing the body on the sill) and if not I would say you can go 14k-ish even given interior. 

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