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For Sale: 1954 CHEVY 150 two door sedan - $1???? - Zanesville, OH - Not Mine


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For Sale: 1954 CHEVY 150 two door sedan - $1???? - Zanesville, OH

https://zanesville.craigslist.org/cto/d/zanesville-1954-chevy-150/7222432294.html

1954 Chevy 150, all original excellent condition, and well serviced and maintained, 230 6 cylinder with 3 speed on the column.

Contact:  Call only (740)-4-five-5-3-5-one-0. (Bob)

 

I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1954 CHEVY 150 two door sedan.

Note: This Chevy 150 is an example of when spartan, basic transportation was still available at your Chevrolet dealership.  It was the type of fleet car utility companies bought, also the choice of the frugal and modest customers.  We had cars like this all over the area when I was a kid.

'54 CHEVY 150 OH a.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH b.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH c.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH d.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH e.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH ea.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH f.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH g.jpg

'54 CHEVY 150 OH h.jpg

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

It was the type of fleet car utility companies bought, also the choice of the frugal and modest customers.

This was also the type of car that people bought when you commonly paid in cash and if you didn't the law restricted any automobile financing over 3 years. 

Not the 7+ year automobile loans that people get today. 

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1 hour ago, 58L-Y8 said:

 We had cars like this all over the area when I was a kid.

 

 

Absolutely. However, I don't recall seeing '53's and '54's with the painted "rock guard" (or whatever Chevy called it) mid body. Was that something that fleet vehicles of this era had, or did the owner of this car just not want to go to the expense of having it plated?

 

I didn't notice if they were fleet vehicles back in the day, but like you, we saw Chevy '53's and '54's EVERYWHERE around here for decades after they were made. For as popular as the '55 and tri-five models were, I don't believe they were as common in these parts as the previous generation of Chevy. It was always my impression that in later years I saw far more unrestored, (or unrodded) 53-54 Chevrolets in people's driveways than any other unrestored passenger cars from the 1950's or earlier. I get the impression that they were among the last cars from the fifties to be considered classic or desirable by the public...I'd see them being used as everyday working vehicles into the 1990's.

 

No, they aren't beauty queens, but I always liked them. My grandad had a '53. The one in this ad is very appealing because of it's bare bones look.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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29 minutes ago, JamesR said:

 

Absolutely. However, I don't recall seeing '53's and '54's with the painted "rock guard" (or whatever Chevy called it) mid body. Was that something that fleet vehicles of this era had, or did the owner of this car just not want to go to the expense of having it plated?

 

I didn't notice if they were fleet vehicles back in the day, but like you, we saw Chevy '53's and '54's EVERYWHERE around here for decades after they were made. For as popular as the '55 and tri-five models were, I don't believe they were as common in these parts as the previous generation of Chevy. It was always my impression that in later years I saw far more unrestored, (or unrodded) 53-54 Chevrolets in people's driveways than any other unrestored passenger cars from the 1950's or earlier. I get the impression that they were among the last cars from the fifties to be considered classic or desirable by the public...I'd see them being used as everyday working vehicles into the 1990's.

 

No, they aren't beauty queens, but I always liked them. My grandad had a '53. The one in this ad is very appealing because of it's bare bones look.

 

The more expensive Bel-air had that part plated (Chrome or stainless), as I recall-

probably also on the mid-level 210,

but as I recall, the low-end series 150 used rubber for that part.

None were painted body color, at least as delivered

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The 150 series can easily be identified by the untrimmed, clean body sides and exposed rubber windshield and backlight gaskets plus the black rubber gravel guards.  As far as their longevity in service, even here in the Northeast where rust ruined legions of cars, those '53-'54 Chevys stuck around longer than their contemporaries.  Cheap to buy, repair and maintain, they did yeoman service as second or work cars for years beyond their expected life cycle.   The station wagons were used like panel trucks since they were so commodious, car-carrier racks on the roofs for ladders.

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8 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

 Cheap to buy, repair and maintain, they did yeoman service as second or work cars for years beyond their expected life cycle.  

 

Again, going off of little more than memories (of 20+ years ago) the only personal-sized American vehicles that seemed to last longer than '53-4 Chevy sedans were the Chevy pickup trucks of roughly the same years. I can remember those being used regularly as unrestored working vehicles into the very early 2000's. Ford pickups of the mid-1950's weren't too far behind in longevity, though. Likewise Chevy pickups of the late 1950's and (especially) early 1960's.

 

I grew up in a snowy midwestern city which was probably as salt-ridden as the Northeast. The only unrestored working vehicles from the fifties that I see nowadays are big Ford and Chevy farm trucks...though I'm not sure how much they're actually used for work. But they are "working" in that many of them still run and function.

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