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Leno on his 1934 Duesenberg Walker Coupe


1935Packard
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4 hours ago, 1935Packard said:

Of potential interest to the group, this was posted today at Jay Leno's Garage:

 

I'll watch the video for sure,  but I always though of that car as the "Mudd" coupe,   as in Dr. Mudd of the famous Doble E-14 fame.  But maybe I'm confusing with the fabric SJ fastback?

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57 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I'll watch the video for sure,  but I always though of that car as the "Mudd" coupe,   as in Dr. Mudd of the famous Doble E-14 fame.  But maybe I'm confusing with the fabric SJ fastback?


 

I thought the same thing......but I think it’s NOT the Mudd coupe........I suspect that in the past, they were posted somewhere and confused.........the Mudd coupe is a fastback unless I am now mistaken. The Mudd coupe also has the eight flange exhaust manifold. 

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Not the mudd coupe.  That has a fabric body similar to a Waymann Monte Carlo Stutz.  

 

the mudd coupe was sold in 2000 by RM at the meadow brook auction for around $1.3 million.  
 

 

https://www.coachbuild.com/2/index.php/encyclopedia/coachbuilders-models/item/bohman-schwarz-duesenberg-j-airflow-mudd-coupe-j212-2234

 

 

Edited by Cadillac Fan (see edit history)
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It's identified in Roe, page 185 as "Car 2569, J554.  A special order in 1934...built by A.H. Walker and issued as a LaGrande."..."Designed by the late J. Herbert Newport."   I seem to recall it was originally ordered by Eli Lilly of the pharmaceutical business.

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On 11/2/2020 at 4:41 PM, 1935Packard said:

Of potential interest to the group, this was posted today at Jay Leno's Garage:

 

Just finished.   Jay does a good job since he's just doing stream of consciousness.   He was hung up on the weight of the car (remarked about 12 times).

 

Save the headlights this would be the Duesenberg I would want.   Not counting the usual suspects of the SSJs and the  Mormon Meteor, but maybe over the 20 grand.

 

Love the styling.

 

Interesting he has the single little dinky drycell 6 volt in there.    I've doubled them up for smaller motors.

 

image.thumb.png.513e168cd9b73d0c25f1bd4c0e8c1a4b.png

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The above set up does not have heavy enough ground cables. That copper fuel line that you can see WILL be carrying current.......NOT a good idea. Batteries should be up on a thin sheet of plywood or rubber, with an acid mat on both sides. And the batteries need to be secured, and I'm not certain about the switch either.........You have work to do. 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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The Walker coupe is interesting......but for me........I would rather a Murphy Disappearing Top Roadster........and the problem with Duesenberg's  ..........there are lots of the common body styles.......thus, when you want something truly different, availability, price, and scattered parts/chassis/body all make getting good and great cars difficult. Notice he said his LeBaron was his favorite because it was all as delivered by the factory........not a scattered parts assemblage. When you start to live in the world of the J, you soon realize that pure cars are very few and far between. It was just the nature of the beast from day one. And the 50's and 60's early restoration shops certainly didn't help the situation. Today people spends hundreds of thousands of dollars to get all the right stuff back on their car.......and the return on investment is well worth it. Some private sales of pure cars that are not generally known to the market are staggering. Figure two or approaching three times the dollars for the right cars. 

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5 hours ago, edinmass said:

. . . Electricity only flows over the surface of metallic things.....thus, that bolt is flowing the entire load............between the frame and grounds........

 

I am not an electrical engineer, but it is my understanding that for low frequencies (including DC) the current goes though the whole conductor. The skin effect is only for AC with the effect more pronounced the higher the frequency.

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I’m not an electrical engineer......but dc wires are not solid like ac in a house.......and the more wires the more amperage capacity........so I would not think the ac/dc comment is correct.

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

I’m not an electrical engineer......but dc wires are not solid like ac in a house.......and the more wires the more amperage capacity........so I would not think the ac/dc comment is correct.

 

Been a long, long time since I got my mechanical engineering degree or worked in the field but I recall copper work hardens pretty easily. And the larger the diameter of the strand/conductor the more strain on the outer portions of the strand when it bends. So thicker strands work harden faster than fine strands and will fail in situations where you have motion or vibration.

 

For wire that is going to be installed in a fixed position with large radius bends where vibration is not a problem you can use solid core wire. Even there you want to support it properly. For example in house wiring, last I checked, you need to support wire at regular intervals and within a few inches of where it enters an electrical box and you shouldn’t have tight radius bends.

 

If vibration or flexing while in use is going to happen, like a house lamp cord, appliance cord or extension cord or anything on a car then you use stranded wire with basically the same total cross section (gauge) based on the design requirements (maximum voltage drop and/or allowed heating).

 

Sorry to have taken this topic off course. The Dusenberg in this episode of Jay Leno’s garage has quite an interesting look and I wish I’d seen it when a group of us visited his collection a number of years ago. Could be that it was in pieces at that time base on what he says in the video. But I have to admit my preference on styling goes a bit more to the 1929-33 era and that car’s body just looks too “late 1930s” for my tastes.

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Interesting, looked it up......and get different answers!  AC vs DC and solid vs multiple strand...........seems the answer isn’t as straight forward as I / we were taught. So, I guess the answer is.....it depends........and also application.

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It is my fault since I posted a picture of my battery box which Ed forgot that he told me 2 years ago was the best setup he had ever seen.   I'll ask one of the moderators to move the batter related posts to one of the threads on cut off switches as it is an important discussion.

 

Plus, you guys need to decide if my setup is going to work.  I was only ME for two years, so I'm not following any of this.

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Probably looked at it on my phone. It’s a good solution for the car but it needs to be tweaked. Especially since I plan on driving that car more than you do, I want to be sure it starts easily.

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Just now, edinmass said:

Probably looked at it on my phone. It’s a good solution for the car but it needs to be tweaked. Especially since I plan on driving that car more than you do, I want to be sure it starts easily.

 

I appreciate that you always have my best interests at heart.   And I've said some dumb things based on reading stuff on my phone...

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