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1931 Wire wheel what could this extra hole be used for or was it drilled as a practical joke so someone would ask 90 years later what is that hole ? ?


Mark Gregory
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It looks like it is 

 

As to your question about who made the wire wheels on the Reo Royales?   
It was Motor Wheel with a part number of 20881.  
The number may have been stamped inside the wheel when new but now may have either rusted over or worn off.  I hope this help you and have a nice day. 

 

Would anyone be able to help identify the holes in this 1931 Reo Royale according to information received they were made by

 

“Reo 18-inch 6.50s used Cleveland Welding wheels. The 6.00 18-inch was MotorWheel.

 

Also the two studs at the bottom and other locations we assume were for weights to balance the wheel.

 

There is three small holes around the hub to drain water when the hubcap was installed ?

 

Where the finger is what would that hole be for ? 

 

The seven others are for the mounting bolts.

 

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Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)
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  I’m just guessing. Hole for locater pin to preserve hub/wheel balance if wheel was removed? I know in the days when we balanced tires by slightly loosening wheel bearings, hand spinning and weighting out heavy spots, we always marked the hub to wheel and tire to valve stem /wheel before removing to preserve balance on installation.

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I agree with the pin on the drum that the wheel would then be aligned to fit on to, had a car decades ago that had that feature. ( it also helped you get a heavy wheel and tire up into place with somewhat less effort)

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Is the small hole threaded ?  if so, some rims had a threaded hole because they had a tendancy to not come off easily because they fit tightly to the brake drum hub. Once all the lug bolts were out, one lug bolt was threaded back into that small hole to "jack" the rim off the brake drum hub.

 

Paul

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It's likely it was to align on a fixture during manufacturing i.e. dropped over a dowel, an indexing hole to clock the lug pattern to air fitting hole so they were all the same. Generally, odd holes in stamped parts are for a fixture, it's to standardize the process. It seems logical that they would just use the lug holes. Most car companies have rules for tooling, any surface that effects the mechanical assembly is called ''A finish'' and cannot be used for fixture location reference etc. They don't want it getting damaged.

 

Thats what all those strange holes are in engine castings, they are reference location holes for the machining process. On the blueprints often a hole like that will be the central point of reference or zero datum. The part is drawn off of that point and the fixtures designed off of that reference as well.

Edited by Locomobile (see edit history)
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If it was a modern used car like a Standard Vanguard of the 40s, 50,s or 60s,  you would fit the wheel so the hole lined up with one on the brake drum.  Then you could turn the wheel carefully so you engage a screwdriver with the slot of one of those wretched serrated cam adjusters.  The lining clearance would soon automatically loosen itself.

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