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On 11/2/2020 at 6:41 PM, 1937hd45 said:

That is just an early 1950's model not so sure how accurate the plans ar. Somewhere around her is a magazine with a Colby underslung chassis photo. When I find it I'll post it. This is turning into one of the best threads on the Forum. Bob

Some on the 1913 Henderon underslung here:  https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=hqOjcs7Dif8C&dat=19130223&printsec=frontpage&hl=en  

 

Scroll to end, where the Auto Show section is for a short article on 'underslung' chassis construction.

 

Craig

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I had a chance to drive this Regal when it was for sale - https://hymanltd.com/vehicles/5760-1913-regal-underslung-model-n-roadster/ .

 

It was really peppy.  You can see the shift lever is in a terrible spot, protruding way out into the passenger compartment and sitting just under your right knee.  It made driving difficult.  I later realized that it must have been installed backward, and its offset bend was meant to take the lever out of the way toward the outside of the car.

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7 hours ago, alsancle said:

Someone active on this forum had a Regal.  Was it Dave Coco (trimcar)?   I can't remember.  

 If I remember correctly he sold it to Jan Bruijn in the Netherlands who restored it as an "unrestored" racer. Jan passed away some time ago so I've no idea where it is now but probably in Europe somewhere.

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Here are a few pictures from gallica.bnf.fr of the Stabilia, a French underslung car. The drawing is from a 1905 issue of Le Chauffeur and the photo is from a 1912 issue of La Vie au Grand Air covering the Paris Motor Show. The founder of Stabilia, Edouard Vrard, previously worked at Leon Bollee so perhaps he was involved with the design of the Leon Bollee underslung racecar of 1899.

Stabilia - Le Chauffeur 01MAR1905.jpg

Stabilia La Vie au Grand Air 21DEC1912.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Benoit said:

Here are a few pictures from gallica.bnf.fr of the Stabilia, a French underslung car. The drawing is from a 1905 issue of Le Chauffeur and the photo is from a 1912 issue of La Vie au Grand Air covering the Paris Motor Show. The founder of Stabilia, Edouard Vrard, previously worked at Leon Bollee so perhaps he was involved with the design of the Leon Bollee underslung racecar of 1899.

Stabilia - Le Chauffeur 01MAR1905.jpg

Stabilia La Vie au Grand Air 21DEC1912.jpg

I’d never heard of those cars. Fantastic illustrations showing the lowered roll center of the car. Thank you for sharing! 

Edited by BobinVirginia (see edit history)
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The photos of this American dealership were sent to me by Stanley Register.  It is a very cool building. Pay particular attention to the roof line and the ornament on top of the building.  The cars in show room appear to be Type 34 Tourist's.  They are probably 1912 models since they have gas lights.  

 

This was in Warren, Ohio.  Can anyone add to the story of this company?

1913-09_AccessoryAndGarageJournal.jpg.d3e58f4009694aacfa58a199676f8b4e.jpg

 

1913-08-20_HorselessAge.thumb.jpg.799df6be75e8e9fd37ebc0645f948067.jpg

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There are at least 61 individual and group photos in the Detroit Public Library's online collection that show one or both of the American Underslungs on the 1913 IAMA tour.  The whole collection of IAMA tour photos is fabulous - crystal clear, and you really get a feel for the guys, the cars, and the driving.
 

https://digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org/islandora/search/catch_all_fields_mt%3A("indiana automobile")

 

This was the third annual reliability run by the Indiana manufacturers, and the most ambitious tour route yet.  The Americans had done well in 1912, and were carrying numbers 1 and 2 because they were the first cars entered for the 1913 run, held in July.  It's kind of bittersweet in hindsight to think that the company would be bankkrupt less than 9 months later.

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On 11/15/2020 at 10:22 AM, A Woolf said:

The photos of this American dealership were sent to me by Stanley Register. 

 

 

1913-08-20_HorselessAge.thumb.jpg.799df6be75e8e9fd37ebc0645f948067.jpg

 

Further research has uncovered the fact that this building was at 133 Lincoln Ave. in Youngstown, OH.  Randolph D Anderson ran a vulcanizing business in Youngstown at the same time that he was an American dealer.  The building still existed as late as 1950 - anybody out there lived in Youngstown that long ago?

Edited by StanleyRegister
corrected typo (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

This is an Underslung Traveler from Pebble Beach in 2010. Maybe someone can fill in details about this car.

Seems like this was a debut of either a freshening up of an older restoration or completion of a stalled restoration.

Where is car today? 

P8151035-vi.jpg

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This 1913 Type 56a Traveler was discovered by Cameron Peck in Illinois in late 1947 (beating out James Melton), and flipped to Frank Miller.  It showed 7000 miles and still had its 1912-1925 license plates.  Miller cleaned it up, got in, and drove it for about 25 years.  Originally red, Miller got Ralph Buckley to paint it Orleans Blue within a year or so of his purchase.  In 1973 or '74 it was sold to Philip Peterson in Massachusetts. 

 

1974-08_Peterson.thumb.jpg.bb1d6cf78f5fd0993187031502591a26.jpg

 

More photos of this car at Pebble are here - https://www.conceptcarz.com/profile/10699,18729/1913-american-underslung-traveler-type-56-a.aspx

Edited by StanleyRegister
Updated history of purchase and color (see edit history)
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59 minutes ago, mdsbob said:

While this car appears to be "identical" to the photo of the car in the National Auto Museum in Reno.

I note several differences in the cars.

 

The most obvious difference to me is in the paint scheme and color.  The two "reds" look different, but it could just be lighting.  Also, the car in Reno does not have the edges of the fenders painted black as the Pebble Beach car does.  

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As far as I've been able to figure, Harrah's had 5 American Underslungs at various times.

 

- 1913 22-A Scout, now in the Stahl collection

- 1913 34-A Tourist, sold by Hyman a few years ago, shades of blue

- 1914 642 roadster, referred to earlier in this thread, light blue

- 1914 644 touring, auctioned by Bonhams in 2015, shades of green

- 1914 644 touring, now in the Louwman collection, gray & black

 

I've always been puzzled by the display of the red car at the NAM.  I have to assume it was prior to 2010, as mdsbob pointed out, at Pebble it had a new top, black lips on the fenders, and plated rim clamps.

Edited by StanleyRegister
replaced Amelia with Pebble (see edit history)
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The picture I posted of the car at Pebble in 2010 is the same car Stanley Register posted photo of when it was blue and is the Miller/Peterson car.

Is it's where about know today? Maybe A Woolf can add some info about this car.

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Wish I could add some more information about the ex Miller Type 56A American but I can't.  Stanley Register has a done a good job of covering the background.  It is a one-of car and probably one of the best preserved Americans. 

Alan 

 

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Speaking of Bill Harrah and Americans, a  gentleman who knew Walt Seely recently related a story to me about Seely and the American he acquired from the Deemer family.  Bill Harrah apparently wanted to own a pre-1911 American Underslung.  As the above list shows Harrah owned several Americans but no early cars. The American Seely owned was probably the best documented and most desirable of the earliest Americans. The story goes that Harrah proposed to trade a Duesenberg to Seely for his 1910 American. Just about the time Seely was supposed to get on a plane and go to Reno to work out the deal Harrah passed away and it didn’t happen. I tend to believe the story because very few of the earliest cars have survived. Plus the production of those early cars was pretty limited. 

 

The photos are mine and were taken at Hershey a bunch of years ago.  The gentleman in the photos is Walt Seely.  

 

American_Underslung_at_Hershey-006.thumb.jpg.0420682adb64ad30577f5e91b6d63a99.jpg

American_Underslung_at_Hershey-002.thumb.jpg.cb8f076ae006698c4091fc6d03254f12.jpg

 

American_Underslung_at_Hershey-001.thumb.jpg.1536d6e97f04b9a0f015abcfb135f2af.jpg

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