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First Duesenberg sold to public


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BobinVIrginia, Yes, like all things to do with human beings. There are good people and bad people everywhere. Over the years, I have met a good number of very good machinists. Some could fix or make almost anything, and do a beautiful job of it. Others, NOTHING on an antique engine is anywhere near good enough to try and use it. EVERYTHING had to be completely re-machined to modern tight tolerances, and surface finished to .001 inch. When done, it not only looks nothing like it originally did? They cannot get it to run for even a minute before the pistons seize up. I have seen model T engines that owners spent $10,000 to $20,000 getting it rebuilt (model Ts should be cheap to rebuild!), and never could make it run. 

And it is not just machinists. Body and paint people, as well as upholsterers, that do not understand antique automobiles, can charge huge amounts of money to do a job so wrong that there is little if any value at all left in the car. Just a couple years ago, there was a common "black era" model T touring car for sale. The seller had receipts for nearly $45,000 restoration cost! A nearly the best on the planet black era model T touring car would only be worth about $12,000. Everything was done wrong. The hideous colors (supposed to be black!), the upholstery that looked like it was stolen off a Lazy Boy. The top so wrong they couldn't put it up without looking horrible, and couldn't fold it down properly either. 

Having read your thread about your car, and your questions, as well as many comments you have made on a number of other threads, I would say you are well on your way to a long and fun time in a wonderful hobby!  You seem to have a good well grounded approach to the learning curve in this hobby, and asking many of the right questions. 

Good luck!

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1 hour ago, wayne sheldon said:

BobinVIrginia, Yes, like all things to do with human beings. There are good people and bad people everywhere. Over the years, I have met a good number of very good machinists. Some could fix or make almost anything, and do a beautiful job of it. Others, NOTHING on an antique engine is anywhere near good enough to try and use it. EVERYTHING had to be completely re-machined to modern tight tolerances, and surface finished to .001 inch. When done, it not only looks nothing like it originally did? They cannot get it to run for even a minute before the pistons seize up. I have seen model T engines that owners spent $10,000 to $20,000 getting it rebuilt (model Ts should be cheap to rebuild!), and never could make it run. 

And it is not just machinists. Body and paint people, as well as upholsterers, that do not understand antique automobiles, can charge huge amounts of money to do a job so wrong that there is little if any value at all left in the car. Just a couple years ago, there was a common "black era" model T touring car for sale. The seller had receipts for nearly $45,000 restoration cost! A nearly the best on the planet black era model T touring car would only be worth about $12,000. Everything was done wrong. The hideous colors (supposed to be black!), the upholstery that looked like it was stolen off a Lazy Boy. The top so wrong they couldn't put it up without looking horrible, and couldn't fold it down properly either. 

Having read your thread about your car, and your questions, as well as many comments you have made on a number of other threads, I would say you are well on your way to a long and fun time in a wonderful hobby!  You seem to have a good well grounded approach to the learning curve in this hobby, and asking many of the right questions. 

Good luck!

Thanks Wayne this is my first early car endeavor. 
Your point was well understood with your last post. I believe the root cause of the issue is some people just don’t understand the entire experience of an old car. 
I’ve been told to swap frames and drivelines etc etc on my Haynes several times. I have to tell them no, that’s not what this car is about. I want to know and experience what a car was like 100 years ago. Whether that sinks in on them or not I don’t know? 
 

To add to your point, anyone can throw money, flashy paint and over the top engine work at a car.  There’s very few that can make them right and know the difference. The phrase “a fool and his money soon part ways” is very obvious with some car owners too. 
I once thought that to have fun with a car it had to be a big horsepower tire shredding monster. While those cars are fun, now that I’m older I appreciate a peaceful ride through the countryside even more. 
Thanks for the positive comments and I appreciate your point of view now that I understand it better. 
 

Hopefully I’ll be able to make good progress on my Haynes soon. 

 

 

Edited by BobinVirginia (see edit history)
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