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I’m always fascinated with the story of vehicles. A car can be valuable from rarity or brand but some are valuable for personal or historic reasons. The cars that transcend time and that are an actual bit of living history. It’s really special to drive and interact with something that exists as it did for our ancestors. Let’s hear those stories of why this car. I’d enjoy hearing them as I’m sure others would. 

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My 1965 Galaxie 500 convert. Sold new by Agnew Motors in Shellbrook, SK. Special ordered by customer, it is a 352 V8, with no other options. No power steering, no power brakes, 3 speed MANUAL column- shift transmission. Customer took delivery in December of 1965. He owned it for two years, in 1967 he blew up the 352, with just under 30,000 miles on it and parked the car beside his chicken coop. Two years later, in 1969 he traded it back in on a new pickup truck as is. Clayton Agnew kept the car- had the engine rebuilt and used the car sparingly in the following years. In 2009, I was able to buy the car with just 31,000 miles on it. Currently it is undergoing a repaint, and has just 41,000 miles on the odometer. 

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1961 Starliner, 1963-1/2 Galaxie fast back and 1965 Galaxie are some of my favorite Fords ever!!!! 
The early 60’s super stock cars are the origins my car interest. Love the factory lightweights and cubic inch wars Great car and thanks for sharing! 

Edited by BobinVirginia (see edit history)
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In finding my wife, I scored big time, I won't go into all the reasons, but I will list one.......She came with great parents.  My inlaws are wonderful, and as an added bonus, my Father in Law is a car guy, spent years of his adult life on a restoration of a 56 Ford pickup, and in doing so exposed his daughter (my wife) to the idea of having classic cars.  For the first 20 years of our marriage, I would love talking cars with him and the conversation would alway end up with him talking about getting a 36 Ford....  his birth year and his favorite car.  As the years went by, it was obvious he would never act on this and buy one.  He felt it was a luxury he didn't need and he is a responsible "provider" for his family.  

About 15 years ago, I just decided to find him one.  I looked locally for about a year and in Lemont Illinois I found him a nice driver four door touring sedan.  We bought it, it was delivered and we hid it in the garage, backed in with headlights and grille facing out.  My father in law Charles flew in that May to run the half marathon in Indianapolis with my wife.  He can fix anything and a visit to our house always involves fixing a list of house issue I can't seem to get to.  After picking him up at the airport, my wife asked him if he'd look at the garage door opener, "it is acting up", he walked out to the garage with us following.  As he opened the door, my wife had the keys in her hand and said "Happy Fathers Day".  He was speechless for 60 seconds processing it.  Then he started to cry.  He composed himself quickly!  about two minutes latter, he was driving, I was shotgun and my wife was in back!  The rest of the day was so fun, he wouldn't leave the car.  We thought he'd sleep in the back seat.  I had made arrangements to ship it to Tucson, his home.  He wouldn't let me.  He flew home, got his truck and borrowed a trailer, drove 2,000 miles back, and towed it home.  He told me the three happiest days of his life was towing it back to Tucson.  Every old guy that passed him honked and waived.  Every stop for gas led to a talk with a stranger about the car.

My Father in law is in the Winter season of his life.  He isn't doing well, but we love spending time with him.  The car will likely soon make its way back to me and into my garage.  It will never be sold, we will keep it forever.  

 

"THE OLD 36"

 

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1 hour ago, trimacar said:

That is a great story.  Good for you, John, what an unselfish act....

We got married so young, 21 and 22.......  my wife was in grad school with a 612 dollar/month stipend. I was starting dental school, taking out student loans and waiting tables/bar tending on the weekends. We were so poor.....and happy.  Both of our sets of parents poured love and support financially as best they could into us.  That 36 Ford (I paid 10,500 for it) is peanuts compared to what my in-laws did for us in those early years. Part of Charles never buying a 36 for himself, was because he was always taking care of others with his money. 
 

sorry, don’t mean to high Jack the thread with all the personal stuff. 

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The 1965 Chrysler 300 was a neighbors car.

I cant tell you how I lusted for that car over the years.

He was second owner, the first ordered it new just so that he could join the three hundred club. The car has NEVER been a daily driver.

My neighbor had it for years but would never consider selling it.

When he died his daughter made sure that I got it.

It is rare that it has the base 383, it also was ordered with AC which I don't particularly care about, power windows.

But the biggie is that its a four speed car. A true gentleman's hot rod.

It just turned 30,000 miles.

 

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My best friend for years was a guy known as Kan who lived in Joplin MO and dealt in GTOs. We were the same age and were in SEA at the same time. Both Pontiac fanatics I was just more interested in the nuts and bolts and he in the end product. Spent long hours discussing the 744 vs the 068 cam in a street car or the difference between a 69 Tee handle and a 70. Were often at odds with the GTOAA & GTOs were "too new" for POCI. What I didn't know is that he had been exposed to agent Orange and did not make it past the '80s. Also we had long discussions about a GTO he was working on and was surprised when he left it to me in his will. 4-speed and AC we both agreed on. Took two years to get a title. Suspect it will be in my estate sale.

 

 

 

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On 10/17/2020 at 3:26 PM, padgett said:

he had been exposed to agent Orange and did not make it past the '80s.

 

What a terrible experience for those where were exposed and had no recourse or protection  My best friend, a Corvette restorer, described getting sprayed at the front daily.  He died at 62 of Lou Gehrig's disease related to his exposure.  The price we paid for a losing endeavor is staggering.

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Prolly silly & nothing to do with cars but always thought the real reason was 500,000 men overland to Peking. Relations opened up and it was over.

 

ps the VA had him 100% disabled.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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On 10/19/2020 at 4:35 PM, padgett said:

Prolly silly & nothing to do with cars but always thought the real reason was 500,000 men overland to Peking. Relations opened up and it was over.

 

ps the VA had him 100% disabled.

Luckily my father was a Sargeant in the heavy armored division and never made it to Vietnam. I’m a 1976 model and he was spared the horror of Vietnam. Stationed in Germany for years during the conflict. Thank you for your story about someone that wasn’t as fortunate. Thank you for keeping the car and your dedication. 

Edited by BobinVirginia (see edit history)
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