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edinmass

edinmass

Graham Man, you are correct.....but removing castor stops death wobble..........and added castor returns the wheel to straight when you release the wheel......like a power steering return. With todays roads, we put castor down to 1/2 a degree. It causes some more steering effort......but it eliminates death wobble. We recently had a car that had a steering dampner on it for fifty years due to death wobble.......I pulled out the shims that were 2.5 degrees and took it down to .5 and the wobble was gone, and I removed the damper. Alignment, air pressure, front end components worn, and modern tires all make each case different. General rule of thumb on BIG pre war cars is 45 pound pressure in front tires, 1/8 inch toe in, 0.5 degrees castor. Check ride height, spring condition, and shackle pins. It's a big picture repair......shocks should also be serviced. I think front end/steering box/suspension is one of the most overlooked areas of drivability issues on cars today. Many people don't know how a car should steer and stop, and thus they think all old cars steer hard and stop poorly. The exact oppisite is true. It's my experience very few cars steered poorly. It's 100 years of wear, lack of service, and other issues that cause cars to perform poorly. 

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edinmass

edinmass

Graham Man, you are correct.....but removing castor stops death wobble..........and added castor returns the wheel to straight when you release the wheel......like a power steering return. With todays roads, we put castor down to 1/2 a degree. It causes some more steering effort......but it eliminates death wobble. We recently had a car that had a steering dampner on it for fifty years due to death wobble.......I pulled out the shims that were 2.5 degrees and took it down to .5 and the wobble was gone, and I removed the damper. Alignment, air pressure, front end components worn, and modern tires all make each case different. General rule of thumb on BIG pre war cars is 45 pound pressure in front tires, 1/8 inch toe in, 0.5 degrees castor. Check ride height, spring condition, and shackle pins. It's a big picture repair......shocks should also be serviced. I think front end/steering box/suspension is one of the most overlooked areas of drivability issues on cars today. Many people don't know how a car should steer and stop, and thus they think all old cars steer hard and stop poorly. The exact oppisite is true. It's my experience very few cars steered poorly. It's 100 years of wear, lack of service, and other issues that cause cars to perform poorly. 

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