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"Cool" as they are now, at one time as used cars, they were the favorite of farmers.  At least two of the 'bachelor farmers' that came to the feed mill in town here used them as trucks.  More than once, I saw those business coupes loaded down with 100 lb feed bags stuffed in the trunk, piled up on against the cab, only the driver's seat with space for the farmer.   No wonder so few survive now.

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2 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

"Cool" as they are now, at one time as used cars, they were the favorite of farmers.  At least two of the 'bachelor farmers' that came to the feed mill in town here used them as trucks.  More than once, I saw those business coupes loaded down with 100 lb feed bags stuffed in the trunk, piled up on against the cab, only the driver's seat with space for the farmer.   No wonder so few survive now.

100 lbs? You probably mean 1,000 lbs?

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Back in the day, feed did come in 100 lb sacks. For about the past 15-20 years, it is 50lb. 
Growing up on a farm, when we did visit the feed store, you would load as much as you could. ( PU truck) so much that even driving slowly, when you’d hit a bump, front tires kind of lost contact. Hard to steer. But it was all back and secondary roads. 
looking back, it was kind of hairy. Just never thought of it and never recall my family ever saying anything but ‘ maybe shouldn’t have had such a load’. Then you’d do the same thing next time. 

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bdc, He means a whole bunch of sacks of feed at a hundred pounds apiece. Or a couple tons total? 

We have become a nation of lazy and fragile people. I am 68, the other day I went into Tractor Supply for a couple things. Walked up to the register with a 44 pound of feed under one arm, and a 20 pound bucket in the other hand (all I went for, I saw no need for a cart?). Put them on the counter, paid for it, and grabbed them up again, As I headed for the door, it just hit me, I had to say it. "I may be getting old, but I still ain't no wimp!" The checker and a customer busted up laughing. 

I remember when sacks of ready mix concrete came in eighty pound sacks. I used to carry two of two of them.

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13 hours ago, bdc said:

100 lbs? You probably mean 1,000 lbs?

Yes, Had to be 100 lbs as the men that worked at the mill wheeled them around on hand-trucks, hiked them up on the truck.  When I say 'truck', that's how they used those old Mopar coupes and sedans.  This would have been in the late 1950's into the 1960's.  It was common knowledge the Mopar flathead six and chassis were bulletproof rugged, easy to fix, parts were cheap and best of all, they were common as dirt and dirt cheap.   Pick-ups weren't all that common, having a car that could be used as a truck too was what worked for that generation.    These were small, one-man family and a maybe hired hand farms, 10-15 cows, small fields and acreage.  It was a way of life that was rapidly disappearing even then. 

Edited by 58L-Y8
How the farmers used Mopar and their operations. (see edit history)
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My family had a cotton gin and cattle feed operation in central Louisiana.  One hasn’t had fun until they’ve loaded a horse trailer (complete with floor coating) with 100 pound burlap sacks of cottonseed hulls.

 

Just think of a hundred pound large beanbag chair...no way to get a handle on it....

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15 hours ago, 58L-Y8 said:

"Cool" as they are now, at one time as used cars, they were the favorite of farmers.  At least two of the 'bachelor farmers' that came to the feed mill in town here used them as trucks.  More than once, I saw those business coupes loaded down with 100 lb feed bags stuffed in the trunk, piled up on against the cab, only the driver's seat with space for the farmer.   No wonder so few survive now.

 

I wonder how many were also converted for dirt track racing? Where I grew up I remember as a kid we'd go to Savannah Mo racing on Saturday nights and this body style seemed to be the favorites of all the teams and fans. There's no way of knowing for sure, but I'd guess a good number of them ended up with a similar fate. The 1934-1948 coupe body styles were the most popular on the track in those days and were seemingly disposable.

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1 hour ago, 30DodgePanel said:

those days and were seemingly disposable.

 

I hate to tell you how many Dodge Chargers I tore up on the dirt tracks.

I used to buy every one of them that was $500 or less.

And not a single digital photo.

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