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Cost to replace a modern windshield vs. classic car windshield


BucketofBolts
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Some knucklehead in a big rig passed me on the Freeway today and sent a small rock into the front windshield of my 2018 Genesis G80.  The "crack" is 20 inches long starting from the small impact crater.  I thought possibly the replacement price might be as much as $1,250.  Dealer gives me a BID for almost $3,000. QUERY: What is the cost to replace a  windshield for a 1920s vehicle? 1930s vehicle? 1940s vehicle? 1950s vehicle 1960s vehicle?   I would think something along the lines of $550 to $750 even for a luxury car such as a Packard. 

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I'd be shopping around - similar thing happened a year ago to us in my wife's 2018 Grand Cherokee driving through Jacksonville.  It has every sensor known to man and several that I'm sure aren't and it was under $1000 to replace including the calibration.  Good luck!

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Back then they were flat laminated glass, so the local installer would just cut a piece the right size. I had a glass supplier in Richmond that had patterns back into the 20s! 

 

So, CHEAP compared to anything curved.

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8 minutes ago, BucketofBolts said:

Dealer gives me a BID for almost $3,000.

 

Right there is the problem, unless you mean a local glass dealer, member of NAGS. Car dealers buy OEM glass at outrageous prices compared to the NAGS resale price list. Now, NAGS list price is something else in the stratosphere above the Van Allen Belt.....😁  Who pays list price?😉

 

And your insurance company says?

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I would check with your insurance company. Your insurance likely will cover the cost and they will certainly know where to send you for the best price. Even if you don't have insurance to cover it, your insurance agent can likely suggest where you should go to get it replaced.  

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3 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

I would check with your insurance company. Your insurance likely will cover the cost and they will certainly know where to send you for the best price. Even if you don't have insurance to cover it, your insurance agent can likely suggest where you should go to get it replaced.  

 

At least around these parts, you have to pay extra for glass coverage. I assume it's expensive because of how the sensors and things have to be positioned

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10 hours ago, BucketofBolts said:

Some knucklehead in a big rig passed me on the Freeway today and sent a small rock into the front windshield of my 2018 Genesis G80.  The "crack" is 20 inches long starting from the small impact crater.  I thought possibly the replacement price might be as much as $1,250.  Dealer gives me a BID for almost $3,000. QUERY: What is the cost to replace a  windshield for a 1920s vehicle? 1930s vehicle? 1940s vehicle? 1950s vehicle 1960s vehicle?   I would think something along the lines of $550 to $750 even for a luxury car such as a Packard. 

I don’t have lots of experience with modern vehicle repairs or parts replacements, but having produced, sold and occasionally installed custom-made curved windshields, rear windows and other glass for rare or one-off post-war vintage cars for over 25 years, I can say windshield prices in my realm usually vary between $1,000-$10,000 and that doesn’t necessarily include shipping or installation. 


As for installations, I just charge by the hour and have experienced everything from relatively simple jobs taking only couple hours to some requiring several days (or longer) worth of severe modifications to the subject vehicle and/or its components like trim moldings, upholstery, etc.

 

Probably the most extensive windshield replacement I’ve done was around $30K, but it included the glass, installation, all necessary custom modifications and repairs to all support structure and trim moldings surrounding the glass, all which had been previously hacked together by some butchers who had restored the poor car (valued at eight figures).


And like with anything else, shipping costs can vary significantly depending on service or urgency. 
I’ve been asked to send windshields via Expedited FedEx services to various parts of the world and since the costs were charged to buyers accounts, I don’t know (nor care about) exact figures, but can only imagine.
 

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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If it's a modern car, make an insurance claim. The last thing your insurance company wants is the liability of an accident with a previously broken windshield in the car. That why there's usually no deductible on a windshield claim and most insurance companies pay for the chip repairs, no questions asked. Let your insurance company handle it on your new car, it won't hurt your rates or your future ability to get insurance. Let them worry about the cost--that's what you're paying them to do.

 

On an old car, well, the answer is always "it depends." Flat-pane glass through the '40s is insanely cheap. A curved windshield from a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham might cost $10,000 and there might only be three guys in the country willing to tackle the job.

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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The first paragraph of Matt Harwood's reply was 100% correct.  It's the comprehensive section

of your insurance policy that covers your windshield glass.   Most states wave the deductible for

windshield glass.  Call your agent, the glass company can order aftermarket replacement

windshield glass and come to you to install it.

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Cost to replace a modern windshield vs. classic car windshield

 

My 62 Pontiac= Glass  $340. rubber channel $ 39.00

My 63 Pontiac= Glass  $170. rubber channel $ 51.00

My 64 VW Beelte= Glass $ 64.95 rubber channel $ 24.95

My 65 VW Beetle= Glass $ 39.95. rubber channel $ 39.95. from 64 to 65 windows/windshields were enlarged.

My 69 Pontiac LeMans= Glass $ 159.00 installation primer $24.00, Glue $26.00

MY 76 Oldsmobile Omega + glass $ 227.00 ( because it's got the radio antenna in it) primer $ 24.00 , glue $26.00

My 2019 NISSAN $ 410.27 and primer and glue Approx $50.00 

 

Hardest car to install? the 62 Pontiac. Easiest car to install 64-5 bug with the 2019 Nissan a close second.   

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15 hours ago, padgett said:

A Reatta is liable to be totalled for a windscreen. Fortunately in Florida if you have comprehensive a windscreen is a $0 deductable.

 

I agree. Not only are the windshields for a Reatta expensive they are getting hard to find. You are lucky Florida has $0 deductible on glass. My Hagerty classic car insurance has $0 deductible but if my Reatta was on my regular insurance a $500 deductible would apply here in Tennessee. At least with the insurance company I have. I don't know about all of them.

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6 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

A curved windshield from a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham might cost $10,000 

Well, individual price of each in the last batch (of 5) I produced wasn’t quite that much, but it was few years ago and I don’t know what their eventual “retail” value became.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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I just did a custom flat windshield for my 1917 White. Fit upper and lower frames. Upper was rectangular and fairly easy, the lower had a compound curve in it. Overall not too much glass. Total cost was 550 dollars..........400 for glass, supplies, and taxes, 150 for labor. (2hoursx75)

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Depending on the trim level, a G80 windshield can cost $2000 just for the glass.  I had an agent call me once to make sure that was correct.  My appraiser confirmed.  Many 2018 Genesis windshields were recalled.  I am not sure if that impacts the price.

 

After replacement, depending on trim level, any number of sensors will need to be recalibrated.

Edited by 39BuickEight (see edit history)
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34 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I just did a custom flat windshield for my 1917 White. Fit upper and lower frames. Upper was rectangular and fairly easy, the lower had a compound curve in it. Overall not too much glass. Total cost was 550 dollars..........400 for glass, supplies, and taxes, 150 for labor. (2hoursx75)

Compound curve in a 1917 windshield??????

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7 hours ago, TTR said:

 

 

Probably the most extensive windshield replacement I’ve done was around $30K, but it included the glass, installation, all necessary custom modifications and repairs to all support structure and trim moldings surrounding the glass, all which had been previously hacked together by some butchers who had restored the poor car (valued at eight figures).


Thirty thousand dollars??? That's a story that needs telling


 

 

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6 minutes ago, GARY F said:

What kind of sensors are in a windshield?   The newest thing I own is a 2010 F-150.

 

Pretty typical nowadays are the camera(s) for lane keeping assist or lane departure warning, sensor for automatic high/low beam control and sensor for automatic windshield wiper operation. There may be more, but these are the ones I’ve heard of.

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Prices are not consistent even for the same car and model. Two years ago I replaced the windshield for my 1994 Lincoln Mark Vlll. Bids ran as high a $1200, I got it done for $300. I suspect that because there are few of these left on the road that the price will remain stable, until the windshield become hard to get, then the price will shoot up.

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OTOH, just few weeks ago I (finally) replaced the windshield in my Roadster due to 30 years of road rash. 

Cost:

Less than an hour to remove old one (for template) and clean channels.

2-3 hr early Saturday am trip to visit a friends local glass shop (before they open), waited and chewed fat with him while he cut the glass.

Less than an hour to prep and install new glass.

2 x Glass (had him cut a spare while at it), $100/each plus adequate tip.

 

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1 hour ago, CarlLaFong said:

Thirty thousand dollars??? That's a story that needs telling

Well, you may have to wait for it in print...

 

... or come by the shop some Saturday afternoon with a bottle of single malt, tasty cigars and at least couple of hours to spare as there's more than few of these stories.  

🥃 Cheers !

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9 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

If it's a modern car, make an insurance claim. The last thing your insurance company wants is the liability of an accident with a previously broken windshield in the car. That why there's usually no deductible on a windshield claim and most insurance companies pay for the chip repairs, no questions asked. Let your insurance company handle it on your new car, it won't hurt your rates or your future ability to get insurance. Let them worry about the cost--that's what you're paying them to do.

 

On an old car, well, the answer is always "it depends." Flat-pane glass through the '40s is insanely cheap. A curved windshield from a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham might cost $10,000 and there might only be three guys in the country willing to tackle the job.

 

1959-60 Eldorado Brougham & Seville are "C" bodied cars I believe. The series 62 coupe and sedan I think are "B" bodies. All full size Chevrolet, Pontiac, Buick and Olds are also "B" bodies. There are no "A" body full size GM cars for 59-60. I believe B&C windshields are the same. One of those windshields ( sans the Italian fleetwoods) will cost me $300.00 and the rubber channel molding is $ 55.00.

1959-60 GM car windshields are not the hardest to put in, they come in third to 54 Olds Starfire &98, 54 Buick Roadmaster. The hardest is 57 Cadillac-58 Pontiac, Chevrolet because the "A" pillar is swept way back 90 degrees and sometimes will crack at the lower corner. That acute angle is a bear. Look at the difference between 57-58 Cad and a 59 Cad below;

1957 Cadillac Coupe DeVille for Sale on ClassicCars.com1959 Cadillac Eldorado - Pictures - CarGurus2nd hardest;1954 Oldsmobile Design - 1954-1956 Oldsmobile | HowStuffWorks                                                                                                                                                            54 Olds

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1 hour ago, Pfeil said:

 

1959-60 Eldorado Brougham & Seville are "C" bodied cars I believe. The series 62 coupe and sedan I think are "B" bodies. All full size Chevrolet, Pontiac, Buick and Olds are also "B" bodies. There are no "A" body full size GM cars for 59-60. I believe B&C windshields are the same. One of those windshields ( sans the Italian fleetwoods) will cost me $300.00 and the rubber channel molding is $ 55.00.

1959-60 GM car windshields are not the hardest to put in, they come in third to 54 Olds Starfire &98, 54 Buick Roadmaster. The hardest is 57 Cadillac-58 Pontiac, Chevrolet because the "A" pillar is swept way back 90 degrees and sometimes will crack at the lower corner. That acute angle is a bear. Look at the difference between 57-58 Cad and a 59 Cad below;

1957 Cadillac Coupe DeVille for Sale on ClassicCars.com1959 Cadillac Eldorado - Pictures - CarGurus2nd hardest;1954 Oldsmobile Design - 1954-1956 Oldsmobile | HowStuffWorks                                                                                                                                                            54 Olds

Perhaps I should've clarified.

My experience and productions mostly extend only to windshields not readily available and in case of my earlier reference to Cadillac, '59 and later "75" series cars and similar limited production makes/models.

Some of the windshields for "mass-production" vehicles I produce use to be impossible to find, even in good used condition 25 years ago, but in last 5-10 years influx of significantly cheaper and inferior quality Ch**ese crap has flooded the market and as we know most of todays so-called car guys don't really care about quality.

Fortunately for me, there still are some that do and are willing to pay for it. Plus it helps that their sales are not may main source of income. They're just another line of products and services I provide for quality concious owners and restorers.

Just yesterday, received another stock shipment of which half were already pre-sold and will get shipped all over the globe within next couple of week.

The rest will also sell eventually.

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My 31 Buick 66S had no windshield frame, glass or seals.  I found The Glass Man Classic Car Flat Glass in California who had listings for all 1931 Buick glass, has drawings and cuts and ships it as safety glass with safety glass identification etched on the glass for those who need that or in my case after signing a liability release form, no marking but still safety glass.  That cost the princely sum of about $250 shipped in a very sturdy engineered cardboard carton.  For cars back to the 20's you can look up the glass you need and order on line.

 

http://www.classicflatglass.com/auto_lookup.aspx

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32 minutes ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Speaking of windshields. Did windshields come with the tinted upper strip in the early 60's? 

I don't know if other manufacturers offered them earlier, but Chrysler Corp. introduced/offered "sunshade" (i.e. darker, bluish tint) on upper part of their (tinted) windshield and rear windows in 1957 which required taller glass design due to regulations prohibiting such practice in earlier (lower design) models. These are usually referred as "tinted and shaded" or GB (="Green Blue").

 

IIRC, just tinted (green) glass and windshields were available on some American cars in the late-30's and by late-40's/early-50's by most manufacturers.

Also, windshields in American made cars were required to be laminated glass around same time frame, while some European manufacturers still offered tempered glass windshields in late-50's/early-60's.

Edited by TTR (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Laughing Coyote said:

Speaking of windshields. Did windshields come with the tinted upper strip in the early 60's? 

Yes, PPG's markings on the glass referred to it as 'Solex' which meant it was tinted, and 'Sunshade' with the darker tint at the top.  (There should also be an 'AS-1' with a lower limit line at the bottom of the darker tint and an arrow pointing down.)   Studebaker used PPG as a vendor, but only the Avanti was offered with the 'Sunshade'.

 

Not sure about early '60's Fords, but later '60's Fords with Carlite glass read 'Sun-X' for tinted and added 'Sun Visor®' if it had the dark tint at the top.

 

Craig

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Our 58 Biscayne got a replacement windshield with the shaded top area in the early 60s. The original was clear, of course, it was a Biscayne!😉

 

I've put a windshield into a 59 Cadillac. It does give a pucker factor when pulling in the corners. Of course, so does an early Corvair, and I've done many of those.😁

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2 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Yes, even my 59 Pontiac Catalina had a tinted windshield from the factory.

Very evident in this image;

1959 Pontiac Catalina - Automobiles and Parts - Buy/Sell - Antique  Automobile Club of America - Discussion Forums

With all due respect and while I don’t doubt your claim in general, but unless that picture was actually taken when the car was new (in 1959 ?) it offers no evidence whatsoever for said claim.

All it proves the car seems to have what appears as a tinted and possibly shaded windshield at the time when the phot was taken.

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1 minute ago, TTR said:

With all due respect and while I don’t doubt your claim in general, but unless that picture was actually taken when the car was new (in 1959 ?) it offers no evidence whatsoever for said claim.

All it proves the car seems to have what appears as a tinted and possibly shaded windshield at the time when the phot was taken.

That is not a picture of my car. The picture shows what the one in my car was like. My car was special ordered by my Dad. I sold the car unfortunately in 1969. The windshield was original / never replaced.

The interesting thing about searching for a good photo of a 59 Pontiac showing the tint was nearly all the Pontiac's I looked up had a tinted windshield.

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15 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

If it's a modern car, make an insurance claim. The last thing your insurance company wants is the liability of an accident with a previously broken windshield in the car. That why there's usually no deductible on a windshield claim and most insurance companies pay for the chip repairs, no questions asked. Let your insurance company handle it on your new car, it won't hurt your rates or your future ability to get insurance. Let them worry about the cost--that's what you're paying them to do.

 

On an old car, well, the answer is always "it depends." Flat-pane glass through the '40s is insanely cheap. A curved windshield from a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham might cost $10,000 and there might only be three guys in the country willing to tackle the job.

What about curved glass on my ‘57 Ford? 😱

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16 hours ago, ply33 said:

 sensor for automatic high/low beam control

If a windshield replacement requires a sensor cal for this, then half the modern vehicles in this area must have had the windshield replaced and the calibration not done. Japanese minivans and Jeeps seem to be worst about it.

 

State trooper cousin averages a stop a week for failure to dim headlights and he tells me most of the drivers he stops for that offense have no idea how to override the system.

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10 hours ago, Pfeil said:

That is not a picture of my car. The picture shows what the one in my car was like. My car was special ordered by my Dad. I sold the car unfortunately in 1969. The windshield was original / never replaced.

The interesting thing about searching for a good photo of a 59 Pontiac showing the tint was nearly all the Pontiac's I looked up had a tinted windshield.

Thanks for clarifying.
 

Based on my limited experience, observations & research by early 1960’s probably more than half new American cars were sold with tinted glass and of those that survive as collectable/drivable/restored/useable examples today probably more than 90% now have tinted glass, whether they originally came with such or not.

 

Of all the production car windshields I’ve reproduced and sold over the past 25+ years, there’s only been couple of occasions in which a buyers (owners ?) had insisted on clear (= non-tinted) glass because their car originally came that way and since I only keep tinted & shade models in-stock, they were willing to pre-pay and wait few months for theirs being custom-made for them (same price, though).


And while i also reproduce (compound curve) glass for some 50+ year old vintage Ferrari production cars, all those are manufactured in clear glass (as they all were originally) and occasionally seeing a car with tinted glass (produced by my competitors) it makes for easy picking for point deductions if the car is being judged according to IAC/PFA guidelines.

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I remember that at least back to the early '60s, at GM tinted windshields (soft-ray ?) was an optional extra. I refused it because I did not want anything affecting my night vision. Have always been concerned since am usually looking about a half-mile ahead particularly for PB <> LI runs mostly at night, had flamethrowers on all of my cars and Cibie halogens in 1964.

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